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PBS
Oct 18, 2012 4:00pm PDT
correspondent was at one such a drought in los angeles. >> you are joining millions of californians. >> the mayor of los angeles hiding under a table. an earthquake drill without the shaking. at 10:18, schools and government offices joined the great shakeout. millions of people across america went through the motions of what would happen if an earthquake struck. >> we know the earthquake is inevitable. we can estimate what the damages are going to be. if people take responsibility for their personal safety, we could change the outcome. >> the city of san francisco was struck by an earthquake of frightening proportions. >> one of the most catastrophic earthquakes was in 1906 when thousands of people died in san francisco. today is the anniversary of the 1989 quake which brought down freeways. earthquakes are part of life here, but the scientists keyboarding the big one -- keep warning that the big one is long overdue. >> it is all about raising awareness. that was a simulation. it was very intense. it could be up to two minutes and that would cause a lot of damage. that is what people are ta
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 4:00pm PDT
do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles. - hi, neighbour! today it's my birthday, and we're going to have a birthday party! and then we're going to the park for a picnic! d you're coming too! and i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 5:30pm EDT
businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
WHUT
Oct 29, 2012 7:00am EDT
presented by kcet los angeles. presented by kcet los angeles.
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 4:00pm PDT
what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kaye. after months of bloodshed, the syrian government agrees to a temporary cease-fire. just days before there is still heavy fighting. can afghanistan really be a viable state? a gloomy picture and they suggested a change of course. and why mixing styria's with satire could helping win the white house -- a serious with a satire could help win the white house. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after months of conflict, will the sound of guns and mortar shells fall silent in syria on friday? the syrian military says it will adhere to a cease-fire for the muslim holiday. but a statement on television says that the army reserves the right to retaliate against rebel attacks. the fragile truce was negotiated by those who hope it could lead to a broader peace process. caroline hawley has the story. largest city today, the front line has shifted after weeks of stalemate. the rebels say they have made significant advances in aleppo, taking territory they have never held before. but can they keep it? and will these men now put down their guns? tonight, on state-run television, a statement from the military. it says it will observe a truce before the muslim holiday. the man who negotiated a truce the said at the start of the job that was nearly impossible. most rebel groups have seemed to agree to the cease-fire, but they do not fight under a single combined. at least one islamist group said it will not observe the true spirit -- the troops. >> of the world is watching on friday morning. we all understand there is a lack of trust between the parties, and therefore, we all understand that we cannot be sure yet what will transpire. the hope is that the guns will fall silent. for the people of syria. >> it is -- this is syria's border with turkey on the eve of the truce. since the conflict began, no cease-fire has taken hold. the expectations for this one are low. >> to the conflict in afghanistan now, where the u.s. military says two of its shoulders have been shot dead by a man wearing an afghan police uniform. it is the latest in a series of insider attacks against international troops. yesterday there was a an attack on two british soldiers cannot helmand program -- british soldiers in helmand province. now there are some who say a rival state may not be achievable. >> the unit of marines was on patrol in one of the toughest areas of homeland. two marines were hit by gunfire and fatally wounded. a one afghan policeman was also killed. the m.o. de said in a statement that the provision patrolman were not in working with any afghan partners of the time. we do not yet know what initiated the exchange of gunfire. the investigation is ongoing. >> the female british soldier has been -- has been named lance corporal channing day. she was just 25. she was proud to be an army medic and always wanted an army career. the corporal who died alongside her was david o'connor, age 27. he was called one of the best, brave, committed, and a true friend. the u.k. may have to recognize that creating a viable state in afghanistan is achievable and p's on the international development community has failed in working alongside the afghan government. >> a huge amount of life has been lost in afghanistan. gains have been made since the taliban were in charge. but we have to focus on securing those gains, rather than more ambitious objectives, for tebow, like building a viable state. -- for example, like building a viable state. >> in kabul, one afghan mps said it is a threatened culture. >> one of the biggest problems is that corruption is everywhere. >> the focus here now is very much on what the west can realistically achieve as international combat forces prepared to leave by the end of 2014. many lives have been lost. nobody wants those sacrifices to have been in vain. but it is increasingly clear that while the international community wants to continue to help, much of what happens next is up to the afghans themselves. >> and a quick look at some other news from around the world. 66 are now known to have been killed in an upsurge of ethnic violence between muslims and buddhists in burma. the more than half the fatalities were within, and more than 2000 homes have been burned down. the u.n. says large numbers of people are fleeing the violence and heading for already over the crowded camps. -- already over-crowded camps. one activist is accused of causing a riot. he is thought to have been snatched in kiev last week and taken back across the border. there are still some high levels of contamination, which had thought to have declined by now, more than any year after the japanese earthquake. the storm has battered at jamaica, haiti and cuba, killing at least two. >> hurricane sandy tore through the eastern part of cuba during the night, crossing the entire region while hardly the in the intensity, as usually happens when such storms cross overland. towns and villages were drenched in torrential rains. wins write a maximum sustained speed of 170 kilometers per hour -- not the wind was at a maximum sustained speed of 170 kilometers per hour. several residents were moved out of harm's way. others rode out the storm as best they could. >> we are handling it ok. >> but at this evacuation center, some who found themselves in the hurricane's path have needed treatment. as the hurricane moved off north to the bahamas compaq -- to the bahamas, daylight met them without power. before hurricane sandy had cuba, it had battered at jamaica. power lines were down and many were forced to be taken to emergency shelters. an elderly man was said to have been killed when a boulder crashed into his house. ibegs a there are many that are trapped in the keys. they were told to evacuate before and refuse to do so. they are now trapped. they called for help, which was by that time to late. >> while jamaica begins couldn't -- cleaning up and council cost -- and counts the costs, the hurricane is headed for the bahamas and there is a tropical storm warning for florida. >> election day in america is not for another 12 days, but that has not stopped millions across the country from already casting their votes. in the past half-hour, there was one notable figure at about the box, barack obama. he is the first one ever to get there before polling day. here is why. >> i travel a lot in my work and i'm not sure if i will be in dc on election day. why not get it 0 @ -- get it out of the way now? >> one of the 1 million americans were casting their ballots early. what is driving his vote? >> a fundamental change in the direction of our government .repare needless to say, i voted for mitt romney for president. i feel he has the experience and the solutions that are likely to put our country on a more successful track. >> also dropping in, patrice weddie, who runs a small business. she is sticking with barack obama because of his health care reform prepared -- reform. >> a couple of days after the reforms kick in, i got a notice that my monthly premium would go down $10. i have all the proof i need to know that the current president and administration are doing a great job. >> at least 35% are expected to go to the polls before election day, up from 30% four years ago. in ohio, close to half the votes will be cast early. in florida, two thirds. in colorado, a projected 85% will be cast before november 6. the most famous early bird of all cast his ballot in chicago. the first sitting president to vote early in person. >> i just want everybody to see how incredibly efficient this was. >> from bill to burris, democrats have lined up their biggest stars to encourage early voting. >> of voting matters. elections matter. >> they are offering transport to polling stations, allowing the campaign to lock in the vote of young people in particular, who otherwise may not turn out. >> everybody who votes, they know that. that is the information that the election officials share with the campaign. they know if someone has voted early. they scratch that person off the list and go down to the next person. >> republicans are better organized than four years ago, but still find themselves at outmuscled on the early vote. does it matter? traditional republicans are more reliable in turning out on polling day. >> in a country where just about everything else is reliant on convenience compaq civic duty is as well. >> for more on why early voting has become so important in this presidential race, i am joined by adam sorensen, the associate editor of "time" magazine. why are more americans voting early and does it affect the outcome of the race? gregg's it absolutely does. -- >> it absolutely does. and have campaigns trying to turn more out. especially democrats. if you look at ohio, you have 1 million that have already voted there. the margin of victory between barack obama and john mccain in 2008 was only 200,000 votes. and that was a fairly large margin, 2, historically. >> and early voting across the nation does tend to lean democratic? >> it does. you can capitalize on these voters the do not necessarily vote in every election and it also appeals to minority groups. >> i was down in ohio last week and i spoke to the romney dara and they said they were not worried about early voting because republicans are more traditional by nature. they like the ceremony of going and voting. >> what republicans will also tell you is that they feel democrats are using out some of their vote early. once you go in on election day, republicans will have more success turning out their voters. that is a little bit of spin, and it is hard to say. but just because, for instance, obama was leading earlier on, that does not necessarily mean he will hunt win in ohio by the same margins. >> on the campaign trail, the president is talking about getting people out on the early voting. but he is also trying to sway any undecided voters. are there any left in the country? greta i think there are. -- >> i think there are. we have seen the number of undecided voters shrink closer to the election, but also at this time of the election, there are fewer and fewer undecided voters. but there are a few people who do not really pay attention to politics who tune in late. they are persuade a ball up to the last minute. >> after two years -- they're able to be persuaded of to the last minute. >> after two years and lots of coverage, it is amazing that people have not made up their minds. gregg's is amazing, but there are those out there. -- >> it is amazing, but there are those out there. >> thank you. still to come, why the world of magic is in russian politics. a disappearing act by dmitri metgod of. -- dmitri medvedev. it is being billed by -- been billed as a massive computer giant. the question everybody is asking is how it will fare against apple's ipad. our correspondent had a look and he reports back. >> this is what computing house looked like for decades, the age of the windows pc. but now we move into a different era of touchscreen mobile computing and microsoft needs to catch an accurate -- catch up. if sheer enthusiasm for his company counts, steve ballmer can make that happen. >> i love this company. yeah! >> he has three imagined windows in windows 8. >> and more than a decade after that, microsoft's boss is still excited. this time, about windows 8. he has decided to bring his company, rather late, into the touch screen age. >> it is an epic of thing for microsoft. it is up there with the top two or three big moment, including windows '95 and the launch of the ibm pc. it starts us on this new era of computing. >> but microsoft has been slow to turn ideas into successful products. bill gates was showing off tablet computers a decade ago, but it was the apple ipad that made money from that idea. but this, the microsoft surfaced in tablet power by windows is designed to show the company moving forward in a mobile world. at the new york launched tonight, steve ballmer was speaking again about windows 8. if consumers do not share his excitement, there could be trouble for him and his company. >> it is barely six months since dmitry medvedev left the kremlin as president to become russia's prime minister. in the short time frame he has seen his power and influence significantly reduced. president putin has been reversing many of the policies and reforms that mr. medvedev instituted. it has suggested that he is gradually disappearing from russia's political stage. here's a report. >> the world of magic is strangely similar to the world of russian politics. behind the kremlin walls, it is all smoke and mirrors. to succeed, you need a cool head, sleight of hand, and there is something else you've got to be good at. making people disappear. and it vladimir putin is the consummate conjurer. since becoming president again, he has begun to wave away the memory of dmitri medvedev's presidency. he has made many of his predecessors reforms and disappear. there are plenty of examples prepare. medvedev had decriminalized slander. putin has read criminalize it. even medvedev's decision to scrap wintertime and keep russian clocks an hour ahead is all under review. it makes him look weak. >> he was and he's gone. putin with light -- prudent would like things to be written in marble. no one but him. >> he has not been able to get rid of him completely. he is still precious prime minister and head of the ruling party. he with a proven's actions, is seen as weaker. his decision not to run for president again men -- made many russian liberals feel betrayed. they were counting on him to lead them into something more democratic. was that a mistake? >> no magician has been able to wave a wand and now we shall have democracy. you cannot just change the way people think. >> and perhaps mr. medvedev's change of fortune is not so surprising. after all, if you take part in the spells and sorcery, there is always the risk that you will never be quite the same again. >> the magical disappearing act with mr. medvedev and his reform. humor has become an integral part in the presidential race in the u.s. we have seen barack obama and mitt romney both on late-night part -- a late night talk shows, while canadians have been -- comedians have been mocking them both. how does humor affect the presidential race? there is a new book about the politics of humor in the presidential race. >> when politics become so polarized in and we start barking at each other a lot, there's a lot of humor in there. >> i feel really restive after the night -- a nice, long naps after the first debate. >> it is nice to wear what ann and i wear around the house. >> i am not sure if there is a bias. the form of satire is such that is anti-establishment, and that is firmly in the liberal we house. it is not in the conservative toolbox. >> michael vick moore in speedos. rush limbaugh in speedos. anybody in speedos. >> if you try to be a conservative who is then funny, it may not be as funny as if he got out there and just try to be funny. >> some of in a single word the best argument for his candidacy. gun at -- governor bush? >> strategery. >> it has to hang on something everyone understands. which means, and george bush is not articulate. al gore stammers. barack obama is cold. that kind of thing. >> i don't mean citizens and i don't mean members of our armed citizens and i don't mean southern whites. >> but, he has to do is reinforce the existing idea of who you are out there. >> the hotel california, you can check in, but you can never -- >> trust the staff with your valuables. >> that is true anywhere. >> but especially california, and j.k., north mexico. -- a.k.a., north mexico. >> is more about his turn, professorial facade. >> with me always is my and burk translator. after the recent town hall debate and the town halt -- the town hall debate -- >> i've got my sweater back. >> when you do make a joke, it has the risk of offending a lot of people. on the iran, most canadians do not care if they have offended you, and that is -- on the other hand, most comedians and do not care if they have offended you. that is where, it gives them strength. >> that is it for our newshour. thanks so much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles. hi, neighbor! my grandpere is coming over to visit for thank you day. yay! and then we're going to have a thank you day party! thank you for coming over to play today. i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! today is thank you day! we say thank you to everyone we love! so thank you for coming over today! happy thank you dayyyyy!
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 4:00pm PDT
businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kaye. superstore and sandy ordaz as massive fatalities and flooding. >> the devastation is unprecedented, like nothing we've ever seen before. >> 8 million on the east coast are without power and the new york transit system suffers major damage. and with just one week to go until election day, how how the storm shaken up the presidential race? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. it is called a super storm, and sandy lived up to her building. tonight, new jersey homeowners are still reeling from the massive damage. and millions on the east coast do not have electricity, and normally booming cities are at a standstill. 33 people have reportedly been killed. >> the destructive power of the super storm unleashed after dark as sandy made landfall. the flooding was instant, the scale shocking. the storm arrived with high tide in new york harbor, creating a surge of nearly 14 feet. subway tunnels flooded. the water engulfed the construction site at ground zero. manhattan was plunged into darkness. electricity generators and exploded in spectacular fashion. >> what is going on? i don't know what is going on. >> oh, my god. >> many cars were damaged by falling trees and high winds. >> 0, my god. my car. >> patients were evacuated from the hospital that lost power when its generator failed. >> in this huge blaze in queens and started in the aftermath of the flood. more than 80 houses were destroyed by the fire. incredibly, only a few people were injured. on staten island, the force that tossed a vote on shore. >> make no mistake about it, this was a devastating storm, maybe the worst we have ever experienced. our first responders have been doing a heroic job protecting our city and saving lives. they are still sitting lives and conducting search and rescue missions and we owe them an enormous debt of gratitude. >> good morning, america -- breaking news, a perfect storm. gregg's america -- >> americans woke up to find it all too real. >> a record-breaking loss of power. >> on manhattan island, they are reeling from what happened. >> there is nothing but you can do. the water is just going to come. it is too strong. you have to stand there and let it happen. >> it is a post apocalyptic scene cars swept down the avenue by the force of the water. debris everywhere. she care of believe what she saw. >> can you describe what happened to? gregg's a lot of water. -- >> i lot of water flowing all over. the transistors are blowing up. >> manhattan is the unusually quiet today. swollen waters rose one began with high tide. -- once again with the high tide. >> this gives you an idea of the massive disruption is still causing. >> the subway is paralyzed. and there are no bosses. -- no buses. they are just some beginning to talked of cleaning up. the city that in gorda 9/11 attacks must recover from the rest of the super storm. >> manhattan as you have never seen it before. let's go to the coast of new jersey, one of the first areas hit by the storm. one of the worst hit areas, ocean city cannot -- ocean city, was evacuated. there were fears of what the high tide might bring. the executive regional chamber of commerce has been talking today. >> we woke up with stand in our streets, debris all over. -- with stand in our streets, debris all over. our community is going to recover, but right now, we are taking a breath to see how bad it is. we had some solar issues that had to be taking care of. people are still not back on the island because we had wires down and trees down and be it -- debris all over. >> you are out in the city now. describe for us what you can see. >> imad 51st and the beach. the -- i am at 51st and the beach. the streets are full of sand. between the ocean and the street, there's not much there. the ocean is breaking right toward the street at high tide. hadof the dunes that we've in the beach replenishment that we've had is gone. luckily, we are in line to get beach replenishment this year, but right now, it is gone. >> michele speaking to me from ocean city. it is one of the areas affected by the storm. sandy has caused more damage than most. david has been finding out why. >> the full ferocity of hurricane sandy as its battered the coast. the wind is at maximum strength. it lasted for hour after hour, the storm surge. >> car alarms are being set off. >> new jersey board of brunt of the onslaught. this is the town of hoboken. at this stage, there was still some power, but flood waters were filling the streets. >> the third -- and this is the morning after hurricane sandy struck hoboken. >> it swept in their far more extensively than forecast. along the new jersey gos, a trail of destruction. this looks like snow. it is, in fact, stand. the vast quantities of it was blown off onto the streets. overall, the impacts have it -- have been devastating. >> it has been terrible. we need to remain patient. let the waters recede. and then we can go way in and make a full response -- full assessment about rebuilding that area of the jersey shore. it is a devastating cycle right now. >> what has made this super storm so damaging is its sheer size, stretching over thousands of miles of coast and still has a lot of potential to cause harm. the fastest wins are 65 miles per hour, less than forecast, and slowing down, but the storm surge was worse than expected. peaked at about 40 feet. that is a record at new york harbor. now the storm is mixed up with a cause harm. colder the storm system, i sierra out of canada. -- icy air out of canada. the storm surge reached the outskirts of washington. the good news, people listen to the warning and got out of harm's way. but it is a natural disaster on a vast scale. the storm is not finished yet cannot and they are still -- is not finished yet, and the officials are still trying to learn its full-scale. >> for more on what authorities are doing, we are joined by congressman frank malone. his district was battered by sandy. new have been out in your district. what did you find? >> it is catastrophic. i've never seen anything le it. one of my talents, union beach, they were literally daughter. some were carried away and others were just reduced to -- were literally battered. some were carried away and others were just reduced to rubble. almost 50% of the town is destroyed. here, the waves did not hit a home is as much, but the storm surge and flooding went to the second floor of some of the houses. most of these houses cannot be saved. many of them will have to be torn down and rebuilt. >> presumably, that will have a huge impact on an area of the country that has already been badly hit by the economy. >> exactly. talk about the public sectors, the boardwalks, the promise on -- the promenade along the businesses. two-thirds of the businesses of the boardwalk were destroyed or carried away. many of the municipal buildings cannot be used anymore. that is a problem in terms of emergency services. >> the white house as announced that the president will be visiting new jersey tomorrow. what do you need in the form of assistance? >> almost everything. you know, not only residences and businesses, but the public sector as well. there is a lot of damage to the public infrastructure. we know that with fema, which is the federal emergency management agency, we will get help for a lot of this. but i'm glad the president is coming. you need to see this firsthand. and what i heard the potential damage of the storm and i was evacuated from my house i thought, this is going to be bad. but when you see it in person you cannot believe how catastrophic is. >> we have been looking at those photos, but i can imagine in person it is a very different story. i'm afraid we have to leave it there. thank you. >> thank you. >> millions of lives have been affected by this storm and so has the presidential race. just a week out from election day cannot -- election day, president obama was at a red cross center today and he will assess the damage tomorrow. a rally in ohio for mitt romney turned into a storm relief drive. i am joined in astin -- austin, texas by matthew doud. i have been speaking to you from both campaigns today. no one wanted to play politics with this storm, but we are a week away from election day and they are both thinking about how this will affect them. >> the first thing it does is freeze the rates where it was before this storm happen. a slight advantage for mitt romney on the popular vote, and a slight advantage for the president to on the electoral college. you cannot really assess this until we get through this. and it will not be until this weekend where we see the impact of this. my inclination is that if the president can be president and not a candidate in the midst of this, he may see some small bump out of this. because the american public will see him acting as president, and that is always an advantage for an incumbent. >> and we have been seeing him get praise from others. governor crist kristie came out and said that the white house has done a first -- governor chris christie came out and said that the white house did a great job. >> i think getting praise from chris christie, a republican governor from new jersey, is huge. he has said more than the democratic governors, actually. i think it creates the idea that the president is handling this well. i think you could possibly see a small bump in a very tight race for the president come this weekend or monday. >> everyone on the east coast is very focused on the devastation caused by sandy. you are in texas. i wonder if everyone is looking at this with the same intensity. >> is the number one story that people are talking about no matter where you live. i am in austin, texas and i have relatives all over the country. this is the number-one thing that they are talking about. there is also a sense of exactly what this is doing in the presidential race. it has been very heated for two years now and is coming to an end. no matter where you live, this is the big concern. people will begin to turn back to the presidential race by thursday or friday and then we will see what this has gone to the course of this race. it has put them both in an awkward position, but they know they have an election seven days from now. >> a very awkward position. thanks very much from austin, texas. hollywood is cashing in with the chinese movie market, but when it comes to homegrown cinema, the hurdles are often too high. >> after the storm cleanup gets under way over the next few days, attention will shift back to america's number-one problem, jobs, or the lack of them. our correspondent in the swing state of colorado. she spoke to a local businessman about -- businesswoman about the issues. >> how have the last four years been for you? >> it has been stressful. it has been a blessing, obviously. >> would you have liked more help as a small-business owner? gregg's absolutely. when the economy tanks, -- >> absolutely. ed, thingsconomy tanks got tight. i build this business. my plan was not helped by the economic situation. >> you are trying to encourage every business owner to employ just one extra person. >> jefferson county has an initiative, just add one. it is for stakeholders like myself, business owners, and we come together and say, let's put together a strategic plan to put people back to work. jefferson county has 20 douses bob businesses. our objective is that if we can get 5% of this area to hire one person, that is a lot of jobs. i think we have a certain group of folks that really understand how bad off we were when president obama took office. then we have the other based on emotion. and they have probably always voted for one party and probably always going to. i have no idea how this thing is going to run. >> for decades, hollywood has played a vital part in spreading the culture and values of the u.s. around the world. it is a use of soft power that china has failed to replicate. in just over a week, the china, and his party will begin the process of appointing a new generation of leaders. -- the chinese communist party will begin the process of appointing a new generation of leaders. >> for get draft the village halls of showing propaganda films. china is the fastest cinema market and hollywood is going to great lengths to get a patient of the action. -- a piece of the action. earlier this year when men in black 3 at the cinema -- hit of the cinema's here, this scene that shows a chinese restaurant workers cast as bad guys was cut. and when makers of the soon-to- be released read on realized a chinese invasion of america online not look good in china, they reportedly remastered the footage to give north korea the villain's role. hollywood willingness to play along means it is gaining ground, even in a market where local productions are protected by a strict quota system that limits film releases to just 34 per year. despite the protectionism, this by hollywood being kept at bay, local chinese protections -- productions are failing to take the lead, certainly not on the international stage, but not in china either where they are struggling to take even half of total box office revenue. some chinese directors say the real threat to homegrown cinema is not hollywood, but china's rigid system of censorship. this director was once banned from making films for five years. he recently took the bold step of blogging about his battle with the sensors. -- censors. >> a lot of chinese directors avoid making films about the realities of life at the -- because of the risk of censorship. few such films get made. >> for now, it seems that many audiences are voting with their feet. it leaves many questions about whether they are capable of that soft power. >> disney will take over lucas films. they are paying just over $1 billion for the production company. and they will release a new star wars film in 2015. my kids will be very happy. back to the devastation jordan -- caused by sandy. laura trevelyan has been covering this for the last 36 hours nonstop. and what does it look like for you where you are? >> as you can see behind me, this city is starting to come back to life. power is beginning to be restored to some parts of the city. the subway is still shut. so are the tunnels that are flooded. it is not clear when it will come back to normal. wall street will start trading tomorrow, but schools are still closed. they are still assessing the damage to the tunnels. the process will take some time but there is less of a surreal feeling. this morning, there was hardly anyone here. anyone who was here was indoors. now the city is moving once again. >> are there bit of the city that still have water in the streets? have all the waters now restricted -- reseeded? >> most of it has receded. i was at the lower east side laporte -- and this morning and the flooding was exceptionally bad. there are basements flooded. much of that water has receded. but many people are leaving their apartments. they did not expect them to flood. they feel they are to unsanitary tuesday. there is a huge disruption that has been caused by the storm. there are some places where some people are still waiting for the waters to recede. a record storm surge here, 14 feet in the new york harbor. all of the predictions about the generators being turned off, all of that came to pass. >> there has been massive criticism over authorities handling of the storm in a previous incidences. so far, what is the opinion of new yorkers over the way this has been managed? >> so far, people seem to be happy. mays said they thought they were hiding at this one after hurricane -- hyping up to this storm after hurricane erin green. -- hurricane irene. this is an island. it is very vulnerable to flooding. that has been known for some time. need some sort of coastal defenses. >> thank you very much. for the last 24 hours, images have been coming in of the sheer strength left by sandy. here are a few photographs that capture these images. ♪ ♪ >> the extraordinary images of new york city, a city that all of us know so well, but it looks very different today. that brings the program to a close. i'm kathy kaye. thank you for watching. i will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles. - hi, neighbor! i'm going to share something special at school today. i can't wait to show you what it is! and then, we're having dinner... at a restaurant! and you're coming, too! i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine, could you be mine ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! i'm so excited! today is my turn to take something to school for show and tell! that means i get to bring something in to school and show my friends.
WHUT
Oct 15, 2012 7:00am EDT
after a three-day journey across los angeles. it traveled just 19 kilometers. in that time, it will now be a permanent exhibit capitola california science center. the biggest obstacles on the journey turned out to be the trees and overhanging cables. the average speed when it was moving was just 3 kilometers per hour. it could actually reach 17,000 kilometers normally. you're watching gmt from bbc world news. these are the headlines. a 14-year-old schoolgirl sent by a taliban in northwest pakistan is under way to britain for medical treatment. a peace deal has been signed in the philippines in the hope of ending a long-running muslim insurgency. business news with aaron. another painful day for portugal. >> lisbon is bracing itself for street protests outside the parliament building today. thousands are expected to gather over the the 2013 budget. some of the hardest test measures ever introduced critics some of the harshest measures ever introduced by the portuguese government. they have to do this as part of the $100 billion bailout that the country receive the last year. in terms of,
WHUT
Oct 2, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> the trials and highly secretive world of the vatican. and accused of stealing documents, giving them to a journalist. >> hello, love and to "gmt." also in the program, the president of georgia concedes defeat to the billionaire opposition leader. does this need a tilt by and for russia? the search for survivors in hong kong in a collision between a boat and a ferry continues. midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 1:00 in the afternoon in vatican city, where pope benedict has returned from holiday to find his former employee on trial, which could lift the lid of the inner and secretive world of the back -- vatican. a controversial book largely based on the documents that were stolen claims that there were power struggles, defamation campaigns, and allegations of corruption at the highest levels of the church. allen, in a sense this case is as much about the catholic church and what goes on inside of it as it is about the fate of this man. >> certainly, this is one of the world's more secretive institutions and has been made desperately uncomfortable with this whole process. remember, earlier this year for weeks on end it found details of its inner workings being strewn across the italian media. the man charged with having been responsible for handling those documents to journalists is none other than the pope's butler, and this had been thought to be an important day in this whole legal process. he had been scheduled to testify in the court room for the first time since his arrest, but there is a very strict vatican news blackout on the proceedings and i just could not tell you yet what he said or did not say. before the procedures began, prosecutors claimed that he had confessed, that he had admitted to leaking these documents because he said he saw corruption everywhere in the church, in his words. perhaps he has been framing that kind of defense throughout the course of the morning. >> we will have to wait and see what transpires in court, but this comes after things light the child abuse scandal. how damaging has this been for the church? >> there was one very serious sounding the credit the beginning from one senior figure in the vatican. the first was that they had allegedly found corruption in the vatican. but there was another lesson later with a besieged the pope to stop him from being shunted aside, sent abroad to expose this kind of corruption. obviously, that sort of thing raises all sorts of questions about the way that the vatican manages its business. i have to say that the rest of it tends to be much less dramatic and interesting. it tended to be revealing of a certain deal of power struggling and maneuvering, backbiting amongst senior figures in the vatican. more like office politics, stuff you get in any large organization. having said that, the vatican would like to think that it is not just any large organization, they like to think of themselves as the center of a large moral universe and felt uncomfortable with that aspect of their interior being shown to the outside world. >> let's take a look at the other stories making headlines around the world today. an outspoken critic of the chinese authorities sparked international condemnation after he was jailed. he was denied the right of appeal based on a tax find imposed on his company. 30 years ago, left and in general [unintelligible] himself a sikh led a high- profile operation against militants. sunday, he was stabbed in the neck by four men with long beards. the president of columbia has prostate cancer and will have surgery on wednesday. he says he will not take a leave of absence from his duties as head of state. police in hong kong have arrested six crewmembers and the incident happened near the island of lombok. the boat sank within minutes of the collision. >> the search and recovery operation continues after hong kong suffered one of their worst public transport disasters in recent memory. this is all that is left of the passenger vessel. the owner was not on board, but the employees were on the company out in to watch for -- fireworks when it collided with another boat. 120 people were on board when it sank. dozens did not survive. the government claimed that numerous obstacles were what prevented the passengers from escaping safely. survivors have been taken to hospitals across hong kong. the cause of the accident, which took place over a long holiday weekend, is still unknown. officials have said the priority is to locate all the missing passengers. >> the president of georgia has conceded that his party has lost the parliamentary elections. he said it was clear that the opposition party hadary majorit. their leader, the country's richest man already, had declared victory. it is the first time in their post-soviet history the power changed hands without a resolute -- revolution. he said he did not agree with the policies of the green coalition party. >> you know that for us, for me, this news was fundamentally unacceptable and remains so. there are deep differences between us and we think that their views are completely wrong. but this is how democracy works and we respect that very much. >> we are in dupont -- tbilisi. tell us a little bit more, damien, about this new man in charge. >> as you say, he is the richest men -- one of the richest men in georgia, but he is also one of the richest men in the world. #153. named as a philanthropist for years here. he burst on the the scene years ago and about to overthrow the government. when he got into politics, everyone was quite skeptical. they now have 80% of the seats in parliament with no credible opposition. it is likely he would be able to oust this powerful ruling party, and it is what he has done, partly thanks to a scandal that broke a few weeks ago where prison guards were seen abusing prisoners. arguably, that is what ousted the ruling party from power. >> some of the reports we're getting is that this will now mean a tilt away from the west and towards russia. is that how you read it? >> it is very hard to say. he himself is a bit ambivalent about this. he gets asked about this a lot. he is accused of having links to the kremlin. some suspect him even of being a stooge about -- vladimir putin. he denies all of this. he says that he sold his businesses in russia and portrays himself as a crowd georgian. it must be said that even though he wants to keep the pro- western, pro-nato course i and georgia, he says at the same time he wants to reestablish links with russia. four years ago they avoided a war. he says he wants to really reestablish links together again with moscow, which many georgians support. they think it just makes sense. from a western perspective, it is difficult to see how you rely on both, wanting to join nato, taking part in missions, but that might be a difficult bridge to combine. the other problem is that there are members of the opposition coalition who do have anti- western, anti-coalition views. >> thank you very much, damien. the high court in london, lawyers are challenging the extradition to the united states on health grounds. it is being seen as a last ditch attempt to avoid being sent to the u.s., where he faces accusations of kidnapping. the bbc for the spares -- for affairs correspondent is that the high court for us. we seem to have had quite a few less the thames, as we keep calling them. what is the basis of this latest appeal? >> it is on health grounds. a couple of weeks ago the european human rights court had their final say. that four other serious terrorism suspects could be sent to the u.s. to face trial. certainly, a british government officials thought there would be no reasonable grounds to act. the last reasonable grounds that they have are his health. they want this stop so that they can have a stand on, they say that his health is rapidly deteriorated in and has been since 2004. they say that the mri scan it may establish that he is not fit to stand trial in a prosecution. if that were the case, it would be oppressive to extradite him to the united states. it is a very strange argument, but if you cast your mind back, the government ruled that pena shea was not fit to stand trial. in relation to the other suspects, their argument is the same one for many years. the the u.s. has no jurisdiction over those crimes and they should have been tried and convicted in the uk. a complex case that i do not think will wrap up any time soon. it could move into tomorrow or even farther along based on the shape of things. >> still to come, we are in south korea looking at a different kind of learning. conveyor belts. workers in northeastern france occupied the site of two arsenal missile steel furnaces on monday. they met in paris to decide their fate. the first had been out of operations since last year. >> they are the last blast furnaces, once the crucible of the french steel industry. now they are to be shut down definitively. the steel tycoon has decided that the floor of the plan is surfaced on requirements. demand has dropped by one quarter since the start of the economic crisis. the decision was formally announced at a meeting in paris. some union members tried to break in to the meeting but were stopped by police. they said it was a black day for french industry. >> today it is official. it will be remembered in the history books. the have just announced a definitive closure of our furnaces. lorraine steel will never be melted in the rain anymore. and you want to take responsibility. >> the news means that more than 600 jobs are to go. the company did make one concession, but there is little hope. across france, the economic outlook is grim. every day brings to more layoffs. now part of the french historic industrial heartland is joining the statistics. bbc news, paris. >> this is "gmt," from "bbc world news." accused of stealing sensitive documents in a trial, set to shed light on the highly secretive world of the vatican. the president of georgia admits defeat to a billionaire opposition leader in parliamentary elections. jamie is here now for a catch up with business news. let's start with jpmorgan and their massive lawsuits. seems to of happened a long time ago now. and bear stearns never got over it. >> you mentioned ancient history, but there have been repercussions. we really should remind ourselves what was going on in the early 2000's. bear stearns at that point and many others were bundling up mortgages that they knew to be rubbish. a 60% of the loans being bought by these companies were 30% behind on their payments when they bundled them up. they sold them as first class aaa. it is that the flexion in these allegations at the heart of these things. whether this actual case will work is a moot point. this is what allison of the ig index said. >> do you feel that the target is not the focus should be? he will have real problems to process through. looking at this in a cynical way, this is not at the behest of working groups set up by the president and we are only one month or so away from those elections. certainly, it will appease some people that retribution might be dished out. >> clearly, something we will have to watch. we know that this airline is in trouble. >> they are grounding the planes for some two days. what is really at risk is there license. the have to keep those airplanes flying to maintain their life since. that is the big risk at the moment. striking over, some people can leave before the patients march, but aviation is warning about safety compliance as they cannot guarantee that all those airplanes are safe at the moment. basically, the government does not have enough money and is cutting back. there could be foreign investors around and the cause of the latest rules by the government, foreign investors can now invest in domestic carriers. there is one other aspect, the owner of the standard said the company may raise cash elsewhere. >> the other thing that has swinging around is that he is in talks to sell and we do not know if it will satisfy or not. really, they have pledged a huge stake as a collateral to the bank. he needs to build a stake in that. >> of course they did not mention the reason he has to do that is that he has to keep the state deeply in debt. >> more than half of the great barrier reef in a australia has disappeared in the past quarter- century. scientists say that the loss has come from a variety of factors. duncan kennedy reports. >> it is the world's largest coral reef, hugging 2.5 -- 2,500 kilometers. more than half of it has been destroyed over the past 25 years. cyclones account for 25% of the destruction, the rest attributed to the crown of thorns starfish. 10% of the damage has come from was been called coral bleaching. a result of global climate change. >> if nothing else changes, the outlook looks bad. we just had a paper published suggesting that over the next 10 years we would see further reductions by half. >> the australian government says they're spending hundreds of millions of dollars trying to protect the great barrier reef, but the united nations says that they risk losing the world heritage status, turning this into not only an ecological disaster, but a financial and political one as well. >> they are now visible through google, but are these pictures about to go from being an up-to- date window on an aquatics masterpiece to a collection from an archive of a disappearing world? >> the education system that is a national machine turning up highly motivated students, what happens if a child does not fit the stereotype? our correspondent has been taking a look at a very different side of south korean education. >> to be successful in south korea, students need a obedience, discipline, and an insatiable appetite for study. at this alternative high school, success is measured slightly differently, in happiness. here the curriculum offers board games as well as mathematics. if you would never give away with this in a normal korean school. this is where they come when they fall off of the education conveyor belt. the teaching here is everything the traditional schooling is not. a would-be chefs with a troubled past. >> there were too many regulations of my old school. i had trouble sticking to them and i got angry. i used to bully and fight with other kids. that my parents got angry, so i ran away from home and i would get into other bad things. >> here he says the teachers are not only more relaxed, but crucially they teach at the rome pace. -- their own pace. a recent government reports suggested that almost half of the students had considered quitting. with more than 80% of them entering higher education, it is getting more pressure, not less. many students say that it is getting harder to compete. that the unemployment rate of monks young people is twice the national average. many students are worried about what all these years of study might actually buy them. 60 years ago, education here was patchy and many successful entrepreneurs never finish school. >> i never went to high school because my father could not afford to send me. there is a great place for alternative schools. when she became a student in her 50's, an unexpected second chance. the principal said that his is a south korean school without competition. everyone can come here, everyone can graduate. it may not fit their national image, but in a country that unsuccess, it raises -- bent on success, it raises important questions. >> that just about wraps it up for this section of "gmt." we have plenty more to come in the next half-hour, so do stay with us here on "bbc world news ." we are taking a short break. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington. the gut wrenching scene inside a hospital in syria, the wounded are many, but the doctors are far too few. >> in the situation inside here is one of unbelievable chaos. we have been here for a brief time and every few minutes, a new patients are brought in as doctors worked under fire to try to keep them alive. >> transferred to a military hospital in pakistan, the teenager targeted has received an outpouring of support from around the world. after their boss's check-up america's election, the vice- presidential candidates prepare to debate had the pressure is intense. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. the reports tonight of a large explosion in the syrian capital of damascus, a reminder that the war is intensifying. it is the northern city of aleppo that has seen some of the fiercest fighting. we have seen the terrible suffering at one of the hospitals in the city where doctors struggle to treat wounded patients. his report contains graphic images. >> this is serious descent into hell. a ruthless air campaign. and the carnage in it wreaks. a war between the state and an armed rebellion where even those that treat the victims are targeted. this hospital has been shelled 12 times. there are few facilities left now to treat the living. and so the bodies pile up outside. waiting to be collected. inside, the surgeon treaty 2- year-old. the scalp was torn open when a rocket landed on his house. in the next bed, the doctors struggled to try to keep them alive. these are now the only two beds left for the surgeons can operate. and with the threat of attack, the entire hospital has moved. every few minutes, more casualties, men. a grim procession of patients from different parts of the city. victims of a remorseless campaign of air strikes and artillery. the shows just landed in a neighborhood nearby. people were on the street when it hit. there are half a dozen casualties, including -- he has shrapnel wounds over his body. the trail of blood leads to the operating room. the 7-year-old condition is serious. as they work on him, more victims, and civilians are continuously brought in. among the bedlam, they have died. they passed without him even knowing what has happened to a sudden. there is no time for sentiment here. but that must make way for those still fighting for life. gosh we lose everything. it will lose our country and our freedom. >> a fighter lies in the bed where the mood just died, the struggle to save another life begins. >> this is an appalling situation. the doctors have tried to revive this young man and failed. he has been pronounced dead and the situation is one of unbelievable chaos. we have been here for a very brief time and new patients are brought in as doctors worked under fire to try to keep alive. >> he is surrounded by the vengeful. >> he is a child killer. what did this child do? is he a terrorist? was he armed? what was he? >> and the people here are caught in no-man's land between the rebels and the army. they're the ones that pay the heaviest price. and they live in fear day and night of the terror that comes from the sky. dodge the little boy one of 37,000 people that have been killed in the course of this conflict. as the death toll mounts, so does the regional tension. the turkish prime minister said that a syrian plane forced to land yesterday was carrying russian-made defense equipment. russia and syria denied there was any illegal cargo on board. in southern turkey, we get the latest. >> turkey allowed the jets to take off in the middle of the night and finished the journey. we had to wait all day to figure out just what it had discovered and confiscated on that plane. the prime minister says that they found in equipment and munitions made in russia and destined for damascus and syria's defense ministry. earlier in the day, they said that was not the case. the equipment on board was legal civilian communications equipment and should be returned immediately. what happened really proves one important point. turkey is now heavily involved in the conflict with syria. at home this country houses syrian refugees, rebels, and has intercepted a syrian jet and divide its own artillery across the border in this area. it has also got a diplomatic and political fight with russia. for the last year, they have been on opposite sides of the syrian conflict and they found that way of working to gather. -- together. >> the latest from southern turkey, a list of the other day's news. the iranian militant group has claimed responsibility for an unmanned drone that israel shot down last week. the leader says it was an iranian made drone. the security chief has been shot dead on his way to the u.s. embassy. eight gunmen on a motorcycle opened fire near his house. he had been involved in the investigation of the embassy attack last month. in pakistan, there has been more rally in support of a teenage girl activist that was shot and wounded on tuesday. today, she was airlifted to a specialist hospital. doctors say her condition has improved, but she is not yet out of danger. they were incensed by her outspoken campaign that girls should be educated. striking a chord in afghanistan where women have seen their prospects change dramatically in recent years. more than 3 million girls now get some education, that is a big rise from when they weren't allowed to go to school at all. many fear that trend could reverse itself after withdrawal of foreign troops. >> an old seen in a changing afghanistan. it is the time of the potato harvest. the children are working in the field that they have done -- as they have done for centuries. families depend on their labour. while the 10-year-old helps out with the farming, she also goes to school. making the long walk every day. >> i am in the second class. we did not have school before. i am really happy i am going to school. >> today is a lesson in the local language. in one fifth of afghan women can read or write, but that is a big improvement from a decade ago. the schools in remote areas are helping. there is a big turnout for the launch of this government school. 3 million afghan girls are getting some education. it still leaves 2 million that have never been the class. but attitudes are changing. >> hi bring the women of afghanistan up to the level, the owner of the future. and they are the owner of all that is happening. >> it is a new era for these girls. now learning to play cricket. they have had to stay at home if the taliban were still in power. curious about me and keen to talk, but outside, they face many restrictions and uncertainty about their future after nato forces pull out. this is one example of the progress has been getting a high school in the past 10 years, but in the rural and less secure areas, there are millions that are not getting any kind of education and are under pressure to get married while still a school age. it is tough being a girl in afghanistan, but they are making a much bigger market. >> for more on the efforts of girls around the globe to get an education, i am joined by the ceo of women for women international. we have had two different sides of the same story, the girl's struggle for education and want to start by asking you about her. you have family in pakistan. how common is it for girls to be targeted when they try to get an education? >> is not common for girls to be targeted when they tried to get an education. pakistan has made tremendous progress in educating girls and a number of universities, and number of very strong and professional women. that is why you see the outrage. i think that also it is barbaric and cowardly. for me to challenge a child, their right to education, a girl's right to education, it is a fundamental violation. >> you think this is isolated to that region where they still have an influence? >> i think we have seen an erosion of rights over the past few years, and we have seen women and girls being targeted more and more by extremist elements. it shows fundamentally that there is a real power struggle going on, but part of the power struggle is being fought on the lines of gender and gender-based violence. >> when you see what is happening nbc our report, he recently returned from afghanistan. how optimistic are you that the improvements that have been made in the last three years in terms of getting girls in the school and allowing them to stay there will be upheld once nato forces leave? >> i think there is a commitment amongst community to keeping children in school and seeing girls in school. we saw a tremendous increase in the number of girls in school in afghanistan once they were pushed out of power. you still have 3 million girls out of school, 35 million worldwide. there is a gap that needs to be addressed. i think that fundamentally, one of the biggest challenges is making sure that girls getting educations, we know that the impact is phenomenal. if the girl has seven years of primary school, she is more likely to -- >> how does that suggest that the taliban will listen if they can take control? >> my sense is the most important way to create an environment of changes around creating community support for education. leadershipen's program where we have worked with 400 people to inform them about the importance of women having access to numerous seats, literacy, and forming part of the community in terms of investing in jobs and learning. >> keep up the good work in afghanistan. you're watching bbc world news america. the chinese also picked up the nobel prize, we will tell you what is between the pages that one such high praise. the human rights group amnesty international says millions of people in china are affected by forced evictions from their land. the debt ridden local authorities are increasingly seizing and selling off land. martin has more on this story from beijing. >> we are in a neighborhood of beijing slated for demolition. this used to be somebody's,, horrible strewn across the place. if you look to my right, you can see just beyond another empty home. what is surprising is that many people have chosen to stay. i have seen an old man in the garden tending his vegetables and another old woman putting out her washing. this whole area is being demolished to make way for construction project. you get some idea at the future if you look at the horizon there. there has been a series of forced evictions. we would have gone there but we were warned by locals that it is too dangerous for us. here is what they had to say about a very violent incident which took place two months ago. >> they used sticks and they hit people so hard. i entered by back and they saved me. they forced us out so that we can sell our homes. >> according to the amnesty international report, the number of violent evictions are rising and land disputes are one of the main source of anger, particularly in the countryside. how they choose to deal with this will be one of the biggest challenges confronting it. there are few supporting roles with more power than the vice- president of the united states. the two men vying for that job will debate each other in kentucky. the stakes are high because the debate last week changed the race. mark is that the debate site in kentucky. gosh a clash of very different man offering very different futures. joe biden emphasizing how the government and helped her, paul ryan with a stern vision of the american austerity. the man with a plan for drastic cuts in spending. some see how joe biden as dangerously loose lips, but his tough style height of the president under pressure. president obama admits that his performance was lamentable. >> governor romney had a good night and i had a bad night. it is not the first time i have had a bad night. >> obama with his failure to hit back by politeness and seemed overwhelmed by his strong performance. it is a tight race. >> a lot of pressure to do better than barack obama. >> some are demoralized and even panicking. they say the mood has changed. >> people realize this is not in the bag and before the day, they were saying he was such a small tumbler and bumbler that there was no way he can win. people see him as a credible candidate in this is going to be a close election. >> that is reflected in the polls. he makes a stunning turnaround. the average puts him ahead for the first time in this contest. >> president obama has to figure out how to regain it and do something different. >> i want to stop the subsidy to pbs. dodge and they tried the fight back with the promise to cut public tv. >> one man has the guts to speak his name. >> big bird. >> a rather desperate move. hong >> taking off and our enemies no matter where they nest. caution the atmosphere is pretty steamy at the moment. >> i am joined by kingston. even the presidential debate doesn't matter that much historic plea. as the vice-presidential debate matter tonight? >> i think it does. it can joe biden stem the bleeding and undo the damage clearly done the barack obama last week? i think he needs to win the debate to change the narrative at this point. also, who is paul ryan? we have been watching clips on american cable to the when james scott hail, ross perot's running mate and turned the camera and said, who am i, why here? we ask that about paul ryan because we know who he is. the democrat bashing hook young got a republican, but he doesn't know where he is in terms of his relationship to governor romney. he will come under pressure to define that tonight. >> we have seen the polls move in as governor romney's favor. you have been at the swing states, what is your impression? >> i have been in florida and ohio. certainly everybody i spoke to was convinced that governor romney won and even obama supporters and are wondering if they're going to vote for him or move over. what is very clear is it really is going to be the economy that decides it. in the economy of monthly and quarterly data releases, this is the economy of day-to-day lives. the struggle to find jobs and pay bills. it was striking and that several people referring to both candidates said, i wish they could step into my shoes for a day to see it as i see it. there is a perception that they have not empathize. hashemi polls suggest that some voters say they are starting to see an uptick in the economy. >> there is a concern about the day-to-day lives and the future. we cut something. that is what washington has done and they're very worried about china. >> nobel prize for literature has been awarded to the chinese writer. making the announcement, the swedish academy praised his for realism. many in the west may not be familiar with his work, but we have more on the prolific writing that has stretched for decades. >> [inaudible] >> he was at home with his dad when he heard that he won the nobel prize for literature, the first chinese national to do so. he said he felt overjoyed and terrified as the man who made the announcement helped enthusiastic. >> it is quite outstanding, and also a unique insight into a unique world had a unique manner. >> he was born into a farming family, and he made that rural existence the subject of many of his books. the best known of which was subsequently made into a film. many of his fellow chinese orphans expressed their support. this writer think his success is just the beginning. >> [indiscernible] >> another chinese water -- the writer awarded a nobel prize, he is currently being held in prison by the chinese authorities for subversion. this time, the official reaction has been very positive. not everyone has welcomed the news. an activist is reported as saying that he was tainted by government connections and awarding him the prize was an insult to humanity and literature. others argue that his riding is of the highest order and should be judged on its own merits. >> we think of china as locked away and when we look at chinese writers, we assume that they can say what they mean. he says exactly what he means, just in a very magical way. in >> he now joins them on the prestigious list of nobel laureates. >> in the chinese nobel prizes often controversial and tomorrow they will be awarded the nobel prize. we will bring you more coverage tomorrow. that brings today's show to a close and you can get more on any of our stories on our website. you can find us on twitter. thank you for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> honduras is the world's most murderous nation. [speaks in spanish] >> someone dies a violent death every 74 minutes. [speaks in spanish] >> the capital of tegucigalpa is home to a unique organization. the people's funeral service helps poor families when they lose a loved one in a city where everyday killing is a fact of life. [indistinct talking] >> another day, another death. a community struggles to understand the killing of a young man, just one of 20 people who meet a violent end every day in honduras. ramon orlando varela was gunned down the day before as he dropped his children off at school. [indistinct talking] he was just 26 years old. [horns honk] ramon's funeral has been funded by the people's funeral service, set up by the mayor of tegucigalpa. nilvia castillo is in charge. [speaking in spanish] >> and it's certainly in demand. in honduras, a toxic mix of guns, gangs, drugs, and corruption has engendered the highest homicide rate in the world--over 80 times that of most european countries. [indistinct talking] the shade is welcome under a tropical sun. but this is no picnic. it's the city's morgue. and all of these people are waiting for the body of a loved one to be released for burial. [speaking in spanish] johnny and his colleagues from the people's funeral service are here often. most of those brought in have died a violent death somewhere in tegucigalpa. there's no shortage of them. [speaking in spanish] >> this couple are waiting for news about the remains of a brother-in-law. they say he was shot in a dispute with a neighbor and died this morning in hospital. it's another example of the everyday incidents of gun violence in honduras, where nearly 3/4 of a million firearms are illegally owned. [speaking in spanish] >> "stay strong," says johnny. "god will help you." [speaking in spanish] >> the people's funeral service doesn't just help the families of victims of violence. and at the funeral home, the man who set up the organization is visiting. the mayor of tegucigalpa is the president of the ruling party. nilvia, teasing me, calls him richard gere, and he certainly has a celebrity-like aura as he greets and comforts the mourners. this is a wake for santas leondarda viadares. consoling her mother, the mayor learns she died from complications in hospital. she was just 51 and used to sell sweets on the steps of a local church. poor families like this one made an impression on the mayor back in 2005. >> i was running for mayor, and one day, i encountered a little kid crying in front of his door of his house. and i went to him and asked him, "what happened?" "my mother left me." i asked the neighbor what was going on. he told me is that she took her television set to a pawn shop in order to get some money to put his father to rest and get the coffin, get the things. and then, i said, "this is something that is happening every day in the capital. we have to do something about it." and that day, i started promoting that if i became mayor, we would have funeral homes in order to give dignity to the poorest people of the city. [indistinct talking] >> and in a culture where community ties are strong, that may mean taking everything needed for a wake into one of the poor barrios of tegucigalpa. with an empty coffin on board, the pickup heads off to the morgue to collect the body of a young gunshot victim. we joined them later as his family take him home. we're heading north now behind the funeral services pickup truck. it's got a coffin on board of this young man. as you come north out of the city, the scenery begins to change. it becomes much poorer, lots of single story breeze block houses. [indistinct talking] >> the body in the coffin is that of ramon orlando varela. [woman weeping and wailing] [indistinct talking] >> we hear ramon's mother before we see her. [crying] [speaking in spanish] [weeping] >> it was just yesterday her son was murdered. his partner erica was with him. [speaking in spanish] >> do you have any idea who might be responsible for this? [speaking in spanish] >> friends and family will keep a vigil here through the night. in the morning, we'll meet them at the cemetery for ramon's burial. we've come back to the funeral home here, and we find another wake going on. this is another young man, emilio mare, who's 19 years old, apparently killed in a drive-by shooting. he wasn't the only one to die. somebody else died with him. i ask emilio mare's uncle, jose avelino, if these kinds of killings happen often in the area where he lives. [speaking in spanish] >> and what's it like living with that kind of fear every day of your life? [speaking in spanish] [indistinct background chatter] >> it isn't only poor people who are being killed in honduras. the campus of the national university of tegucigalpa feels very different to the poor barrios of the capital. the students relaxing here with their friends could be anywhere. but these young people aren't safe, either. last year in october, honduras was shocked at the killings of two students, allegedly at the hands of the police. the mother of one of the victims, julieta castellanos, is a rector of the university. her son alejandro and his friend carlos were shot as they drove home from a night out. [speaking in spanish] >> there was a huge reaction from the honduras people when this happened to carlos and rafal alejandro, wasn't there? tell us a bit about that. [speaking in spanish] [indistinct talking] >> so far, no officer's been charged in relation to these killings, but they did put police reform right at the top of the political agenda in honduras. >> that is the case-- [indistinct]. it's one of hundreds. and for a long time, a lot of us working human rights have said, you know, no one can do this, no one can come into the communities armed like this, hunt young people down and kill them. no one can do this except police officers. >> i asked the mayor of tegucigalpa what the national government is doing about police reform. >> we have to purify the police the fastest as possible. but without this motivating the other, good police, it's not going to be easy. there's too many interests. there's too many links between police and other-- and crime and other things. so you have to take it in a way that the people who are doing it don't lose their lives because they're doing it. i mean, there's something that needs to be done. everybody's conscious about it. the government is conscious about it. i'm conscious about it. you have to do it the right way in order don't hit you back stronger than what we're having the problem right now. >> cleaning up the police is critical. the capital's many small business owners feel vulnerable, as if they have no protection. one young honduran, who wants to remain anonymous, tells us what happened at his parents' restaurant last year. >> some person came in. they were a civilian who were dressing as policemen. they hit two clients. one of them died, and the other one, he survived, but he has some problem in the leg. i tell you, one of them was captured, like, a month later, and he was actually a policeman in service. >> he was a policeman in service? >> yeah. and he was-- >> but he came in his uniform? >> yeah, in the uniform. you don't know if you can trust in the police or in the-- >> and so, how does that make you feel, as a young honduran? >> hopeless. hopeless. honduras is really a nice country, and we have really a nice people here, hardworking people. but the situation that is going right now here is really a difficult one. my parents, they have speak to me. after i finish college. they will send me. 2 or 3 years more, and i'll be gone. my sister this year, she's leaving to panama. my brother, maybe in 5 years, he is moving to panama. >> but they want to keep you safe? >> they want me to go out of honduras because the situation here is getting worse every day. we can't trust anybody here. only family. >> you look really depressed, actually, as you're telling me this story. >> yeah. and now, you open a newspaper, and it's like, death everywhere. >> tegucigalpa looks almost tranquil from up here, the highest point overlooking the city. but at street level, beneath the embrace of the giant christ figure, extreme levels of violence have become endemic. [gunfire] in 2009, a military coup against president manuel zelaya sparked a wave of political killings. [indistinct shouting] >> but the murder rate had already begun to rise rapidly. in fact, it's doubled since 2005. many blame mexico's drug war, which forced the cartels down into central america. around 80% of cocaine-smuggling flights from the south now touch down in honduras before moving to markets in the united states and europe. >> you have a country in which corruption is deeply set at all levels. then, you have--this is corruption, on one hand, and then, you have drug-related gangs as well involved and getting into police and the military. and then, to have a coup d'etat that tells the military and the police that it's absolutely ok to go above the law, to break the laws, whichever law it is. and you have the situation where we are right now. it's not new. this is not caused by the coup. but it has been worse by the coup. [speaking in spanish] >> radio globo is firmly identified with the anti-coup political opposition in honduras. its journalists follow a radical agenda. the on-air talk is of land rights, corruption, and the links between the authorities and violent crime. [speaking in spanish] >> but talk comes at a price. gilda silverstrucci is one of radio globo's presenters, and she's a journalist under threat. [speaking in spanish] [indistinct talking] >> 23 honduran journalists have been murdered since 2010. assassins have also killed lawyers, lesbian and gay campaigners, and political activists. the people's funeral service sees only victims who are poor, its simple humanity providing dignity amidst the violence. [indistinct talking] today, with the help of johnny and the team, ramon orlando varela is being laid in his final resting place. [singing and speaking in spanish] >> shot in the street, ramon died a sudden and savage death, one that bore all the hallmarks of a targeted assassination. but no one could tell us why he died. now, ramon joins so many other young hondurans on a peaceful hillside in tegucigalpa, a city where life is cheap, and funerals are free. [indistinct talking] >> funding was made possible by... the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu... newman's own foundation... and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles. - hi, neighbour! tonight, my babysitter prince tuesday is coming over to take care of me. and then we're going to school with all of our friends! i'm so glad you're here with me. and, i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ grr! hi, neighbour! grr! i'm daniel tiger, and this is tigey! grr! we're playing jungle!
PBS
Oct 22, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard -- use their expertise in global finance the guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our spending global network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is a "bbc world news america." the final 90 minutes president obama and governor romney prepare for their last the day. is there anyone left to persuade? he stripped of his seven titles, lance armstrong is given a lifetime ban from the sport he once ruled. a is nothing sacred? the 07 trades in his signature martini for a beer. as james bond sold out in skyfall? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. 15 days to go until the presidential election. it seems unbelievable that there are voters left that have not made up their mind. but tonight, the final debate could be the event that tips them. this race is very tight. mark starts our coverage from the debate site. >> it won't come down to the foot of a coin, but the election hangs in there. he takes a little time on the florida beach. with only one opponent down tonight, he probably doesn't feel as still as he looks. they will set out how they think america should act abroad. president obama says he has his record. he says he rebuild america's image and to mend relations. but he says he has failed to give strong leadership to the world, particularly over the arab revolution. john mccain stood against obama in 2008 and is helping governor romney prepare for the debate. >> us, said there was a strong horse and we course, people like these from worse. we are clearly the week course in the middle east today. we are paying a very heavy price for that. >> the increased the size of the army and navy, and stopping iran from reaching enough uranium to build a bomb. one senior adviser says it could be dangerous. >> a lot of swagger, not a lot of cooperation, probably being a little to trigger happy. as a candidate, he has a tendency to shoot first and then later. >> he says obama should have given more of the lead. saying the administration shied away from admitting that the ambassador was killed by terrorists. dodge there were many days where we knew it was a spontaneous demonstration or a terrorist attack. >> of the suggestion that anybody on my team would play politics or mislead we have lost four of our own governor his offensive. >> after row, even tiny slips and victories can matter. while many americans don't care that much about foreign affairs, they do care about the commander-in-chief. >> have little and crucial. for more on the stakes in the topics that might come out tonight, i am joined by the national correspondent for the atlantic. tell me, how different what america looks under president barack obama and a second term and governor romney wanting to become president? >> quite substantial. the difference will be pronounced more internally. governor romney, his foreign- policy is very general rather than having a specific agenda. the changes will be in tax rates as opposed to the interaction with allies. >> they make it sound as if there is a world of difference. >> it is likely that many of the advisers that surrounded the george w. bush administration make up the the strength of the foreign policy team and will probably have more of that kind of town. >> governor romney says he would be tougher with iran. he will call tie the currency manipulator. has there one particular area where there be a significant difference? dodge the tone towards iran would probably be tougher. obama says that iran will not get a nuclear weapon. governor romney would not declare china currency manipulator and find a way to say it was not necessarily because no american president has veered very much from the policy of engagement. >> he suggested we have not seen a debate change the direct -- trajectory of erases much as the first debate. >> i am cautious making predictions because we all thought that the divisions were reestablished. it was hard to know that people are still waiting to hear. if we saw a dramatic change in the polls, half of the way that president obama had a lackluster showing. we don't know what might happen in these 90 minutes which is why we watch, historically, the third debates have less scoring power. god you just got back from china, this race is very tight and at the moment. people watching around the world simply can't vote -- not believe that barack obama might lose. >> they don't have disputed elections there very often, but i was working in beijing during the mccain racing and people were assuming as many people in america were a month ago that president obama had so fundamentally that governor romney would not be able to overtake him. this is quite a tight race right now. caution that is why tonight's debate is worth watching. a quick look from around the world, the lebanese army will act decisively after violent clashes following sunday's funeral. he was killed by a bomb on friday at his death has made great anger across lebanon. three people have been killed in street battles. in the shooting of 34 miners by police has been reviewed in south africa during the strike of americana line in august. the state president has set up an inquiry that opens at the start of october and well as family members and the victims to attend. all of the events that led up to the strike. fidel castro has appeared in public for the first time in several months, refusing and that he is gravely ill. a politician that met him showed photos of him being soldiers. the revolutionary leader has also published an article saying that far from being ill, he doesn't even remember what a headache feels like. the editors of the current affairs program news night is to step aside while an investigation is carried out into why the bbc decided not to run a report on child sex allegations made against the late bbc presenter. in his log, given the partially -- they presented programs for more than 40 years. our home editor. >> investigate another. news night, amid allegations of corporate cover-up. the editor peter rep and stepping aside while investigations continue. explaining his decision to a joint investigation was inaccurate and incomplete, they say. the latest twist comes on the day of the panorama documentary that reveals the impact it had on one of the women being interviewed. >> the fact that i have gone through all the stress what i really needed to concentrate on getting well. >> middle stone includes interviews with reporters and producers behind the abortive investigation. >> ever since the investigation was taken to shelve the story, i have not been happy with the public announcements made by the bbc. >> i was sure the story would come out one way or another and if it did, the ec would be accused of a cover-up. peter saying that the story is strong enough, substantial damage to bbc reputation. >> the editor of the news night, he ultimately reported to the director of news. the editor-in-chief is the director general. further details have emerged of a brief conversation with fellow director during which she warned that the news night investigation went ahead and how he might have to change the christmas kettles. they have scheduled to attributes over christmas. last month, he took over as director general. >> there are the two independent reviews that have been set up, one looking at the past decade, and exactly what happened on his night. dodge the prime minister was asked what he made of the latest revelations of the affair. >> development are concerned because the bbc has changed its story. the questions need be entered by the independent reviews that the bbc has established. >> what makes the allegations particularly serious is that they call and question the independence of the journalism. any suggestion that news reporters were prevented from broadcasting a story could cause real damage to the credibility of news. >> i don't think they have handled it terribly well. this is the worst crisis i can remember in my nearly 50 years at the bbc. >> with new revelations of abuse is still emerging, some of the apparent conflict between journalists and their editors as a side show. but the stake is public trust in the institution. it is seen as evidence of a vital independence. >> plants armstrong was once heralded as a sport in legend. the day, the cyclist who pays the ultimate price. the governing body has decided to strip him of his titles have banned him from the sport for life. i am joined by liz clarke. the president of the international cycling federation has said that lance armstrong has no place in cycling and he deserves to be forgotten. is that fair? >> i was struck by the power of that word. i think it probably is fair, as harsh as it is. all only be engaged in doping for basically every athletic achievement he had, but he believed his teammates, and teammates, and he lied most emphatically. in fact, he came after people have that suggested he was competing on the up and up. is there a day of reckoning >> was it because he was such a hero with his fight against cancer, held up as such a role model? there is something that we as spectators at a journalist, we build figures up to herculean proportions, and when they come crashing down, it is all the more devastating. >> that is true of men in america, we have seen that pattern over and over again. whether it's marion jones, michael veeck, barry bonds. the armstrong case is really its own dimension. primarily because of the extent he went to threaten other athletes in developing as well and making decisions that they really didn't want unmake to further his glory. and the venom and vengefulness with which he went against people the question him, journalists or newspapers, the u.s. anti-dumping agency. he did not just say he was innocent. he took a very venomous white superior -- swipes. >> were his runners-up claim? was anybody in this sport really claim? caution that is such a sad question. i've been there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that the time in which he dominated, the entire sport was just as dirty as could be. it was simply leveling the playing field in their mind. and then they compete from there. sadly, 21 of 22 finishers had confessed to doping or link to. there is no deserving bronze medalist horse over a matter less in the wings, and no one is deserving of the honor. people will tell you that the sport has literally come clean and today's athletes should not pay the price for the transgressions of those before. >> he is not going to write again. is it the end for doping in cycling? >> i certainly hope so. history shows us that whatever task is engineered to find out building, there is another drug to outfox the or basket. it has very much of that a cat and mouse game between those that would vote and those that would create a clean sport. i like to believe, but i am not sure i can believe that for cycling or swimming or athletics for many sports. >> thank you for talking to us. you are watching bbc world news america. tonight, new evidence of a deadly cholera outbreak with raising an issue for organizers there. japan has posted its worst september trade in more than 30 years. what is behind the slide? >> anti-japanese protests swept across hot jazz -- across in september. it is clear that they were right to worry. exports from japan to china plunged in september and car sales have been hit particularly hard. a toyota and nissan are reporting large vase and exports and in production. but it is not just tried out. across the board, exporters looked grim. shipments to europe are down by more than 20% in september. exporters are being hit by the strong japanese yen that makes the product expensive. japan is also having to import more. following the nuclear disaster, all but one of the nuclear power stations remain closed. were the ones last three of the total imports are out of fuel. >> in other words, there is no energy problem. we are still dragging the aftermath of the innocent -- into the meeting that it is less than 4%. energy prices have surged, and this is one of the reasons why we're getting constantly very large amounts of trade deficits. >> experts say october could be even worse. the impact of japanese boycott takes effect. there is now an urgent need for the government here to resolve the acrimonious island dispute with china. >> today, hillary and bill clinton were helping showcase a key u.s. aid projects launched in the wake of the devastating earthquake that hit the island in 2010. ? on the heels of that disaster can the outbreak of cholera. there is evidence of a united nations base housing peacekeepers. the cholera strain killed more than 7000 people as an exact match to the strain found in nepal. got it kills within hours. it is a matter of life or death. she is one of more than 200 cases seen in this clinic allowed every week. cholera only costs a few pounds to a tree. she made it, but thousands have died. it is here 2 years ago the new group of soldiers arrived. there were from the pool where cholera is endemic. it is near the day's just a few weeks later that the first case was reported. the un report last year admitted that sedentary conditions inside the compound were appalling. they said no one was to blame for the outbreak. hal, one of the authors says there is new evidence that changes that conclusion. >> weed out of that it is an exact match to the strain of cholera in the hall. the most likely source was somewhat infected with the strain and who was associated with the united nations facility. >> cholera is spread through dirty water and sewage. and in many parts of the country, they are and just appalling state. and let it hit the coastal town, there were thousands of cases in the first few days. how does the u.n. response to the charge that it brought cholera? >> the un has to answer that allegation, but it must go through a legal procedure. i can tell you the work of a coordinator responding to that terrible epidemic, the fact that we have seen a significant decline in cases over the past year. nadia you find it incredibly difficult being the person the u.n. puts out to answer these kinds of questions. >> yes. i can't give you answers because half of the issues are out of my hands. >> it attacks the young and old. haiti did not need this. the un is an organization that seeks to do good in the world but it is facing a real crisis. that might be a crisis of its own making. >> a serious investigation there. we all know how james bond alexa's martini, but we are about to find out how he takes his beer. the world premiere of sky fall was just days away and it is not the action or romance that has people talking. his choice of drink is raising the question if the action hero has sold out. >> product placement in which companies pay millions to have their merchandise is displayed in films is a tradition in bond movies. but bringing in heineken into the mix through an advertisement in the film itself just isn't right to say some bond fans. placing cars in double a seven films is fine. it goes with bonn's image. >> he is not supposed to drink beer, he is supposed to have 54 dib -- don perignon. i can't help but feel like it is selling out a little bit. >> at one point, he does drink his trademark law of the martini. the presence of the beer is subtle but the producers got a big dollars. it is being reported that the third of the $150 million budget came from different product placement deals. >> what are your views? >> is a necessity and people make such a big deal out of it. it is unfortunate, but we get the movies made at that as all that matters. i hold myself a little bit for that, and we get a movie made. everybody wins. >> is a necessary evil? >> i think so. but it is nothing new. it has been happening for the past 50 years. i don't see it as such a big deal. >> some directors to the product placement is a big deal because the impact it could have artistic control. >> a friendly person, product placement money will be sent, would it be possible for him to not say that while he is holding my thing? >> product placement has been noted by industry analysts the point of the film which is getting strong reviews is just as much a commercial marketing machine as ever. and it is effective. bond probably out does most other fictional movie heroes. >> the cost of making a bond movie. that brings today's program to a close. thank you for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles.
WETA
Oct 17, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard -- ease their expertise in global finance the guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global that work to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america." barack obama fights back for the second presidential debate. igniting a lively clash with governor romney. >> i had a question, and the question was how much did you cut them by? >> i am happy to answer the question. >> a bank in new york charged with attempting to blow up the federal reserve building. and a sporting legend, lance armstrve deal wh nike in the midst of a dramatic doping scandal. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. barack obama and governor romney have returned to the campaign trail today following the fiery debate. obamaressure on president last night to overcome his lackluster showing in the first debate. governor romney gave little ground, setting the stage for a series of bruising exchanges. the north american editor was watching. >> in 19 days' time, what man will be elected president. both are claiming victories in the big debate. the two men face questions from the audience which reflected the overwhelming worry. >> what can you say to reassure me and my parents that i will be able to support myself? >> what has happened over the last four years has been very hard for america's young people. i know what it takes to get this economy going. >> president obama under pressure after his past performance in the last debate and went on the attack. >> he has a one-point plan, to make sure the people at the top plate by a different set of rules. it has been his philosophy as a governor and as a presidential candidate. >> used to getting their own way, determined to get the last word. >> not true, governor romney. >> they got uncomfortably close. >> i have a question, how much did you cut them by? >> i happy to answer the question. >> and odd phrase talking about equal opportunities. >> i said, can you help us find folks? they brought us binders full of women. >> the humor did not last long. mr. romney has said that the president was slow to blame terrorist. >> get the transcript. >> he did, in fact, sir. >> slapped down by the moderator, he found it hard to recover. >> that took them a long time to say this was a terrorist act. hamite incorrect in that regard? on sunday, -- >> he strode over to intimidate his floundering opponent. others were shocked by the brutality of the confrontation. >> the main points weren't hurt because of the aggression. >> i did not think it was going to be aggressive. i did think that obama would step up to the plate. >> it might be off-putting to some, but it put him back in the game and " the fear of supporters that he did not have the fight left in him. >> for more on last night's showdown. the big question, did the president do enough to stop the slide in the poll numbers? >> he came out a completely different person. al gore had said that maybe the altitude had affected him. it was a large question about whether it will up and the race, but i suspect we will see is a continuing close race all the way to november. governor romney had many good points about the president's record and hammered home the state of the economy. he seemed a little bothered in contrast to his last performance where he seemed in command at a number of points on the question on libya, he seemed nervous, flustered, and never really regained his stride after that. >> will that have the impact of the first debates? >> we tend not to pay much attention of for policy. it is not governor romney's strong area. some republicans are nervous the final debate on grounds largely handled by president obama. >> they tried to appeal to women. and who can often better? >> president obama did better on that. the light about binders full of women as been kind of a social be a joke for better or for worse and president obama had convictions of pay equity. >> 20 days ago, who has the edge? >> is a jump ball, a very close election. the 2000 election and that i lived through was very close, the 2004 election was close, i suspect this will be close. >> how are they going to make up their mind in this closing day? >> in states over, people are already voting, so we are learning when the tripwire is, and i suspect that it is often the last voice they hear, maybe they will wake up on the morning of november 6 in whatever the last when they hear. >> what will the candidates defocusing don? >> it is whether he can plausibly pass the commander-in- chief dust or if he has a bunch of talking points and if his foreign-policy will be to belligerent. president obama has a strong case to make broadly speaking that he has kept his promises and redirected the fight. i think he has a strong case to make on foreign policy. inlet's turn to developments new york were authorities have announced they arrested a man that was plotting to blow up the federal reserve building in n.nhat it appears that the arrest was the result of a sting operation. let's get more on this. barbara, what is the latest? >> we are told by the justice department that this plot has been in progress for quite a long time. he arrived in america back in january with the intent of carrying out terrorist attacks. when he tried recruit people, he inadvertently contacted an fbi informer. from the point on, they were monitoring him very closely and that no time was the public any danger. and there was an fbi agent that posed as a facilitator had supplied him with materials he thought were explosives. that agent was with him this morning when he assembled what he thought was a thousand-pound bomb. he tried repeatedly to detonate it from a nearby hotel and he was arrested after that. >> ever since 11 years ago, there have been a number of these sustain operations. widely the fbi use this technique? >> they will try to get potential terrorists off the streets. it serves their purposes to come alongside him and see what he is doing, follow what he is doing. the evidence can be used him in court -- and against him in court and that is what happened right to the very end, up to the point where he thought he was admitting a bomb. it raises dangers of entrapment, the idea of them encouraging them to carry out a terrorist attack as opposed to observing its. they are well aware of that and they stressed hotbed this was a plot completely devise by this man and he had come here with the express purpose of carrying out that plot. >> other news from around the world, 10 soldiers wounded in the suicide car bombing at a military outpost. has claimedn responsibility for the attack. three have been killed after a raid in mombasa. the injured several officers. not one of them later died. the u.s. ambassador to japan promised to cooperate fully in a probe into a launch of u.s. servicemen, detained on tuesday. tensions are high between the u.s. military and the locals campaigning for american bases to be removed from the island. lance armstrong was once regarded as a miracle man. not only did he win a record- breaking seven titles, he overcame cancer. the week after damning allegations were published against them, he was stripped of his car sponsorship deal with nike. he has announced that he is stepping down as chairman of his cancer charity. >> accused of being edgy, a starstruck career in danger of disintegrating. the scandal engulfing the champion gets bigger. his long-standing sponsored doesn't want to be associated with lance armstrong anymore. more than 1000 pages by the u.s. anti-doping agency, too strong to be ignored. despite constant in the aisles of wrongdoing. the announcement was made within minutes of another stunning revelation. he stepped down as chairman of the cancer charity he founded. live strong has raised hundreds of millions of dollars fighting the disease with them as its figurehead. in his first public statement since the release of the report, he said he had to distance himself from the foundation to spare it from being tarnished by the controversy. his reputation was built not only by his prowess on the bike but his network supporting cancer victims. he used it as a motivation for a come back to cycling in 2009. the damage to that reputation gets worse by the day. what is being described as the sordid affair will continue to reverberate. >> every time ago, i discussed his amazing fall from grace with usa today columnist. the nike stuck with him through thick and thin. or why did they finally did jim? gosh they really didn't nobody. tiger woods, kobe bryant, they misbehave at nike stays with them. the evidence was overwhelming, the allegations from the doping agency. those seven days, it became too much. that says it all. >> lance armstrong, can he really carry on denying these allegations? >> that news came a few minutes before the news of nike dropping him. we thought, my goodness, he blank. the first where he says, i can't go on. i think that is as much of an admission that we might see a while. although i hope he finally does come clean because this is a terrible time for him. >> did it ever seen ever so slightly meteoric to you? >> hall of the minister, he has fallen so far in disgrace. if you wanted to believe that he was a clean athlete and many people did, especially cancer survivors, family members of cancer survivors, he is an icon to them. if you wanted to believe he was clean, you have to say he was the only clean athlete and probably the dirtiest sport on the planet. there was a lot of wishful thinking to begin with. >> are we complicity because he wanted to believe in the fairy tale? >> that is the reason people cheer at the london olympics, that is what everything is about with sports which is why we love it so much. more and more, the sports news is a mirror of our society and lance armstrong is showing us the worst of society. >> despite what f. scott fitzgerald said, could there be a second back? >> anything is possible, but the notion that this man -- and we can make us strong case, put him into our world. this is one of the worst cases of lying and cheating we have never seen anything by a public figure. i find it hard to believe that he can come back. he has got a lot of explaining to do and a lot of making out to do. >> will we expect an apology in the near future? >> he is arrogant and of little, but i think it made the man did. >> the latest sought the in the lance armstrong story. still to come on tonight's program, an amazing athlete from an air candidate -- air canada pilot and the passengers that saved the day. cambodians are paying their respects to the country's former king that died on monday. the body arrived home today. jonathan has this report. >> saying goodbye to a man his extraordinary life mirrored the history of this country. at times, they were lining up to pray in a man that they all called the king father. i feel so emotional. it was the father of our independence and the king throughout my life. they clutch flowers and portraits. to some, the sense of loss was too much. cambodians in particular, it symbolizes a lost era of innocence. they started lining the streets have watched their can take his final journey. >> most of the younger people that have come here have actually seen very little of a man that spent most of the last few decades out of the country who last held any real power half a century ago, but he has been one of the very few constants in a country that has endured many changes. that is why many have come out for a final farewell. >> after hours of waiting, the gilded coffin finally swept past on its way to the royal palace where it will lie in stasis for months. this is the end of that era, not just for cambodia, but the world of colorful and charismatic autocrats. >> of jewish settlements in the west bank have long been a source of tension. they are considered illegal under international law but israel disputes this. israel as wanting to demolish a village to make way for a new settlement. it claims the village itself was constructed illegally, but campaigners say forcing them to move contravenes international law. >> the 10-year-old is a good student. but like manyirls, she loves going to school. the boys, less so. gold from old tires, the school is precarious in more ways than one. all of the students here are children of arab nomads that have relocated to the dusty valley in the occupied west bank. now the israelis want them to move again. >> the school is part of our community, if it is closed and demolished, the girls in pa they will probably have to drop out of education. >> the many jewish settlement overlooking the school are illegal under international law. israel says this is israeli state land and has plans to develop the settlement. they say they have no legal right to be here, so they must move on. >> it was built the takeover in a political act, a piece of land. we are sellers, we use a very similar tactics. >> with movement and access to land increasingly restricted, they say their way of life is under threat in what has become a struggle for basic cil rights, israel stands to relocate as many as 30,000 from several different communities. in this community, their full israelis and the sins and were moved here by the israeli government in the 1950's from their ancestral land. they now face of the chin, their homes to be demolished because israel wants to build a new community here. israel says this village and many others are not recognized and therefore, illegal. they argue that the forced relocation of these communities would contravene international law. >> we want to move you to bring someone else. as a set, human rights are suspended. the rule of law is suspended. >> concentrating on her homework, she has a dream to one day become a teacher. her father admits if the school was demolished, that dream might never be realized. >> we have received a statement since filming that story that says the school was built illegally, they have no permits for construction. he issued a stop orders and demolition orders. the state is still waiting to find an appropriate place for relocation, but it will be demolished eventually. the to a remarkable rescue thanks to a pilot and his passengers. the crew on board an air canada flight was asked to divert her and held five a solo yachtsman lost at sea. ldving a dog in the oceanou be an impossible task, so the captain came up with a plan. help lone yachtsman, coming in the unlikely form of the diverted passenger jet. the 15-hour journey was interrupted for those on board the air canada via -- flight. sent to search for the missing blood, the crew and passengers became lookouts. >> everyone's heart started beating a little bit faster. anything out of the ordinary as a bit concerning. they said, we would appreciate it if everyone could look out their windows and if anybody has any binoculars that can help us identify this yacht, it would be helpful. >> the trip was nearing the final destination when the pilot was asked to divert. that meant to descend from 35,000 feet to 5,000 feet, allowing all those on board to get a good look at the ocean below. >> i made the announcement to the passengers, please help us look for, if you see anything. it is difficult to find anything. 5,000 feet is still about a mile above the water. they say, i see what i think as the boat. what we proceeded over and it was almost exactly where they had told us it would be. >> once he had been spotted, an austrian police boat pick it up. s said to be in good condition after his dramatic rescue. >> now to a final story. how much would you pay for a pair of slippers? in paris, a single payer sold it at auction for almost $65,000. the are over 200 years old and in excellent condition. the auction of the queen's belongings took place following her anniversary. she was be headed during the french revolution in october of 1793. that brings today's program to a close. you can find constant updates on our web site and you can reach me and must of the bbc team on twitter. for all of us here, thanks for watching. we will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vt., and honolulu. newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance the guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies. from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles.
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 4:00pm PDT
wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news america. >> this is "bbc world news america" reported from washington. after 48 hours, we can finally see the scale of sandy's wrath. president obama flies into the worst hit area, new jersey. >> we are here for you. we will not forget, we will follow up and make sure that you get all of the help you need until you rebuild. >> china is the country on the rise but could at the growing wealth crap slow it down? we continue our special report. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we are going to be here for the long haul. that is what president obama promised people in new jersey. he flew into the region of the coast. more than 50 people were killed in the storm, millions are still without electricity. >> leadership and a crisis, that is what america demands of a president six days before the election, this was barack obama's chance to show it. he traveled to new jersey, the state that was in the eye of the superstore, to see the damage. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet whose lives have been up and it, my second message is, we are here for you. we will not forget, we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until it you rebuild. >> at his side, new jersey straight jersey republican -- at his side, new jersey republican governor chris christie. what the president found was scenes of utter devastation. this was seaside heights. the homes had been destroyed. this is the mangled metal of what was an amusement park. in new jersey, across the hudson river from manhattan, we found waterfront neighbors cut off. some attempted it the watery drive. he did not make it to the other side. this man told me he would have to climb out through the car window. he would have to take photographs of the insurance company. those without power bedded down for a second night in shelters. we met tiffany phillips who was forced out of her home in a hurry. >> i've literally just made it out because the water and up being more than waste time. >> in new york, the scale and power of the storm becomes more clear. s.i., the damage to property is mindboggling. rescuers have put their lives on the line to save others. the human cost of this disaster is rising. dozens of victims whose names are slowly emerging. among them, an off-duty police officer who died after helping others escape. at the heart of the city, life is slowly returning to normal. new yorkers across the brooklyn bridge on a foot. michael bloomberg sounded a defiant first belt of a reopened stock exchange. the message from the mayor is that the big apple is open for business. that only tells part of the story. in the greater new york area, there is still many many homes without power. the subway network is shut down. this is the scene at one subway station where monday night the waters rose from track to ceiling. parts of the network will reopen tomorrow. this is a city that has survived or stand sandy. hear, all along on the eastern seaboard. questions to test those who would lead america. >> questions indeed. for the very latest, we can go to jane hill. as steve was reported, the city is starting to get back to life. i am not sure this will be a new york that we all know. >> no, it is a very peculiar feeling. we are very near battery park on the southern tip of manhattan. this is the battery under park, one of the seven main passes through the city. four out of seven of these tunnels are still full of water. this is part of the challenge facing the authorities. in fact, he made the point that this is one of the issues that he is aware of. if this city is going to be back moving. these underpasses are vital to traffic flows and they have to be pumped out. this is a massive drop. it feels actually quite busy given that it is rush hour here. there are a lot of cabs in particular going up and down. i think you get a sense of this city moving. it is some way that people can get around. this is of course a subway that is the lifeblood. no service at all. there will be skeleton service tomorrow, but only for some people. it will only bridge feed -- be between brooklyn and getting into manhattan. the vast majority is still many many days from operating fully. they will not begin to put a date on it, to put a time on it. the damage to the subway is enormous and it has been described as the worst damage in the subways history. until you can get that running again come to get people moving up and down the island, then really, new york is not really ready to roll. >> is any speculation on how long this will take? >> journalists ask every news conference but in terms of the subway, no. they said that buses will be fully operational. that will allow people to get around. the whole system has to be cleaned out before it can be put into operation. we are talking about flooding. they have to test all of the electrics and every single station. >> ok. as you have heard, the subways to not mix with brackish water. as we have been saying, president obama has been touring new jersey to see the devastation for himself. for more on the government response, i spoke a short time ago to the u.s. congressman who represents atlantic city. i asked him what he needs the most. >> we need to get set up because of the devastation that it has caused so many people and this loss, as your reporter described. parts of north jersey, this is the lowest 1/3 of the state. there are parts of north jersey that have lots of structural damage. this has come into homes and businesses that will just be devastating. if you could imagine attempting to clean up without power, how much more difficult that is. getting power restored is of a primary concern, especially along the coast. >> i know it has only been a couple of days, but do you have any sense of how long this will take? the president has said that they will be with the residents of new jersey for however long it will take. >> it will be quite a while. i had an aerial tour with the coast guard this morning and we stressed from the delaware bay which is essentially the delaware bridge. those are rather small communities. they were totally devastated. houses that were crushed like matchbooks. roads that are totally impassible. people that cannot get out. if we move along the coast, again, we have businesses, there is one straw -- small restaurant in town a few feet from me. they have 3 feet of sand in the restaurant. it is difficult to determine how long it will take for the cleanup. i very pleased that the governor signed the declaration. it will be up to us to make sure that bureaucracy does not get in the way. >> ok, thank you very much for joining us. when barack obama was torn in new jersey, he was the president of the u.s., but he was also there as a candidate hoping for four more years in the job. with just six days to go, politics is inevitable part of the response. what we don't know is how it will affect the race. for more, i spoke with douglas brinkley whose experiences are chronicled in the book, the great delusion. >> well, we did have the 2005 hurricane katrina which devastated the gulf south america. we had 2000 people killed in that disaster. we have never had something like this, and actual disaster. what was learned from katrina is that george w. bush got a lot of phones down for doing a flyover and for not going into louisiana. for acting like he could look at it from a distance. all politicians have learned from his mistakes. uc barack obama cancelling his campaign, going to new jersey, and meeting with chris christie, a republican. most people in the u.s. he has done a good job. he was talking with the army corps as engineers. in that regard, it has helped, getting all the face time on the television when you don't see much of mitt romney. >> it has been striking, hasn't it, to see him with the governor and listening to the two of them congratulate and thank each other in this campaign we have seen such bitter politics. to see a democrat and republican coming together like this. >> that is supposed to be the best of america, when there is a kind of bipartisan effort in a time of disaster. you see it exemplified by obama and christie today. this election is in a dead heat. polls give obama a slight edge. some of the other states are close. nobody knows what will happen. what we do know is that romney had a little bit of momentum. he was closing gaps, then everything stopped and the election was put on hold. president obama, you can feel the momentum on his side right now. we will have to see how the election plays out. sandy, beyond being a natural disaster, will always be part of the american electoral history. >> sandy has blunted some of the more bitter partisanship. now. we have six days left until the elections. will we hear a different town when the present its back on the campaign trail? >> slightly different. the president will want to stay optimistic, not suddenly descend into taken some cheap shots or one liners. he is now playing commander in chief of an ongoing crisis. remember, this is not about a day when a storm hits. this will go on for weeks and months. i think you will have an optimistic tone for the president. mitt romney will be going after obama more through his sarah gets. he will have to discuss why there are better times ahead. why he can manage the economy. that has been lackluster. i think that home would be kinder. >> how long does it take and how much does it cost to rebuild the battered communities? in japan, they are still asking that question a year after the tsunami. billions of dollars destined for reconstruction have been misspent. >> the images of the massive it tsunami is surging ashore in march 2011 are indelibly burned into the members of people around the world. the destruction was on a scale few people had ever seen before and many found it hard to comprehend. the coastline more than 250 kilometers long was left utterly devastated. whole town's white from the map in a matter of minutes. it was clear that the cleanup and rebuilding was going to be an enormous effort. the biggest since the end of world war ii. the japanese government to decide 150 billion u.s. dollars to fund it. it turns out that a quarter is spent on projects completely unrelated to the disaster. the list of projects, according to the japanese government's audit, is quite extraordinary. this includes funding for a road-building project in okinawa. renovation of government buildings, fighter pilot training, an advertising campaign for the taurus building, and even if funding for their controversial willie program. this is all left the japanese government looking very read in the face. japan's prime minister has apologized to parliament and is promising such spending will be eradicated in the future. that will do little to placate the 325,000 people who remain displaced from the disaster zone in cramped temporary accommodations. rebuilding on this scale is a huge an extremely complicated project. there is growing frustration along the northeast coast that 19 months after the tsunami struck, virtually not a single new building has been finished. >> the extraordinary. you're watching "bbc world news america," dealing with it consequences of sandy. one woman is forced to flee the storm. now it is a painful way to see what has happened to her home. 35 years after he bought up the first star wars film, now george lucas has sold the franchise to disney for more than $4 billion. the deal will see the release of another three star wars movie. >> it is one the best known and most popular film series of all time and now fans that no more star wars movies are on the way. george looked as war may involve but the films will now be produced by disney who paid him 4.5 billion pounds for a look this film. >> i will go out and explore my own interest. i'm completely confident that disney will take good care of the franchise i have built. >> the last movie was released in 2005 and after the next film, disney hopes to bring out a new movie every two-three years. and here at the studios just as that of london is where it all began. back in 1976 when lukas made his first star wars film little knowing it would give birth to a franchise that would make billions at the box office and even more and spinoffs and merchandising. disney believes there is even more money to be made. the next movie is almost certain to be a huge commercial hit, but after that the series continued success would depend on whether audiences see if it as a triumphant return to the spirit of the original. >> the ruling communist party in china prepares to appoint a new generation of leaders. one of the biggest challenges is inequality of income. the new bosses want to maintain economic growth and will need to manage the gap between rich and poor. rapid developments brought prosperity for some while leaving many developments behind. >> if china's leaders could choose one of their own to symbolize their decades in power, this might be it. shanghai's rise as an important hub has been dazzling. the boom has provided jobs for millions of workers. pushing per capita income well above 12,000 u.s. dollars a year. shanghai is a symbol of modern china in and other important way. those who are growing rich here, those who pay two and a half million u.s. dollars for part was like this one are aware that the growing wealth gap is leading to resentment and anger. >> it is definitely getting bigger and bigger. some people are trying to make something out of it. they're trying to control everything. they're trying to calm these people down. >> some of economists argue that strong government is now part of china's problem. they have a reliance on big infrastructure spending which is stifling innovation and distorted the economy. >> this is becoming the problem, not the solution. the government is too powerful. the people are getting a smaller piece of the cake. that is why the chinese economy, it is difficult to transform from investment- driven to a consumption-driven because of the people that have enough income to consume. >> it is not hard to find people without a net income to consume in shanghai. -- has a fountain and kitchen with her neighbors. this city might be a success story, but it is a reminder of the challenges that lie ahead for the next generation of leaders. >> we will have more of those reports during the week. back to our top stories. the aftermath of superstore sandy. across new york, residents are trying to cope. the major disruption is couple of serious uncertainty. a librarian from long island left her home on sunday evening and is now stranded in an apartment in the east village without power. she is just one of the people that we caught up with to hear her firsthand account. >> we have never seen any storm like this. we evacuated on sunday. this came into my house, then it got swept away. notice, the american flag is still standing. there is the fire. hear, now, in the east village with no lights on. >> i don't have any electricity. >> i'm waiting now to see if the house is standing. i wish i have taken these with me. i did not think it down no one got hurt. nobody is -- to know, i have my dogs. other than that, we are ok. we can rebuild. >> this is the light, no power. i of political because it is dangerous to drive like this. we see this in the other direction. this is not safe at all for anyone's life. >> stranded, i have no power or water. i had to go charge my phone. we need to find a hot shower, that is what all of the personal tax messages are for. i have a shower for later today, tomorrow morning, tomorrow night. >> it gives me a day off in the middle of the week, so i'm not completed to but -- so i am not complaining too much. >> i was kind of scared. the power went out. there was a huge explosion. so, we just crashed on the couch and the floor. we are kind of young. we only had some aspect of it. school was canceled. it is kind of surprise in the under crowd, i think. -- it was kind of surprising the younger crowd, i think. >> the city without power. thankful that there is not been an even greater loss of life. that brings us to a close. remember, you can get updates on sandy's i aftermath anytime on our website. thank you so much for watching. from all of us here, i will see back. -- i will see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles. - hi, neighbour! tonight, my babysitter prince tuesday is coming over to take care of me. and then we're going to school with all of our friends! i'm so glad you're here with me. and, i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day 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PBS
Oct 12, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. for a pakastani girl attacked by the taliban. the pakastani girls are demanding an education. the economic crisis and some are ready to celebrate. and he may be -- they may be numbered two on the ticket, but the vice presidential candidates traded verbal blows last night as election day lems. -- looms. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. today people in pakistan observed a day of prayer for malala yousafzai. she is a 14-year-old girl shot in the head by the taliban. her crime was to campaign for girls like herself to have an education. the attack has been condemned across the globe. our journalist was the first to report from her home town. >> prayers across pakistan have been dedicated to malala. the 14-year-old remains in critical condition, three days after a taliban assassin shot her in the head. just two weeks ago the girl that has become the focus of worldwide attention was filmed at home, helping her younger brother with his work. it is for her own writings she became famous. the school flag flies at half mast. the students do not know when she will return here to her desk. everywhere there is evidence of the accolades she won defining the taliban and campaigning for girls' education. the biology told us of the horror of the attack, showing us the school band she was traveling on when the gunmen climbed on board and targeted her. the blood stain. but she was not the only girl who was injured. this girl, whose face was concealed by the safety, was hurt. >> we were all screaming. the man pointed his pistol at our faces. i did feel i was shot in the arm. the fear is still with me now. >> they have taken to the streets and malala's tragedy has had reverberations across appestat. >> the taliban are now frantically releasing statement after statement trying to justify the attack. they also recognize it could be a turning point. the militants say their policy of not attacking journalists has not changed. all watershed moment in maybe, but not everyone convinced it will be for the good. bbc news. story, iore on malala's spoke a brief time ago to the former u.s. ambassador to pakistan. thank you for joining us. he was saying in his report this could prove a turning point with pakistan. what do you think? >> i think there are millions of people across pakistan that certainly hope so. i was very encouraged to die. of course, it is the day of prayer for malala. the chief of the mosque in lahore calls for "and ambassador of hope." that is an enormously significant. religious scholars have issued a fatwah, determining that the attack was unislamic. these are important messages that we hope will unify pakistan and they seem to be. >> how much support do you think there is at the grass-roots level for the taliban policy of not letting girls of education? >> is basically a conservative society. you would find most people are conservative about girls' education. they supported for the first -- for the first few years. they do support -- is long does it support girls' education. -- islam does support girls' education. the fact that malala is one of them, it has personalized the issue. >> do you think this attack on malala might help the pakastani government have the political will to take on the taliban? >> i just heard that the ministry and the minister of the interior are hoping this will give them the will to move the bank that has not happened and needs to happen if pakistan is to have an effective counterterrorism policy. >> are you worried that the american condemnation of the attack on malala could prove counterproductive when you are trying to help? >> we are not the only ones condemning. even those who are anti-american are condemning the attack. it may reverberate most negatively against one candidate for president, but he has held back from condemning the taliban himself for a reason that i think is very interesting. he says he is afraid they would retaliate against his workers in the region. that shows you the deaths of the year and intimidation that just a handful -- the death of the fear and intimidation that just a handful of terrorists have. they hate the teheran and fever and the attacking of innocent -- they hate the terror and fear and the attacking of innocent children. they are afraid to speak out. >> thank you for training as. more than 40 have been injured in clashes between supporters and opponents of presidents mohammed mursi. former government officials have been accused of ordering attacks on protesters during the revolution. russia has denied there were any weapons on board the syrian plane coming from moscow that was forced to land by turkey on wednesday. russia says that the plane was carrying radar equipment. now mother teresa, nelson mandela, theodore roosevelt. just a few who have won the nobel peace prize. now you can add the european yen -- union to that list. the award comes as many countries in the union are facing economic hardship. not everyone is in the mood to party. gavin hewitt reports. >> the nobel peace prize is to be awarded to the european union. >> there were gasps of surprise in norway. the un is facing violent protests. but the prize honor the eu for the atmosphere of peace and reconciliation for the last six decades. >> i did not expect it to be such a good day. it is with great emotion i received the news to award the global peace prize to the european union. >> the european union emerged from the barbarism of world war ii. when the berlin wall came down in 1989, the u.s. acted as a beacon for democracy for countries that had been under soviet rule. but the nobel committee's decision is controversial to some. in the falklands, the eu failed to act to save lives. >> i think it is a statement about peace in your. i think many of us would argue that nato has kept violence today more than the european union did. >> and today the european union is being challenged by a debt crisis that has caused the new tensions in southern europe. spain observed its national day today in a somber mood. recession and unemployment pulled protesters onto the streets and many question whether this was the right moment for a peace prize. >> actually, i was surprised. i think it is not the best timing for europe to win this prize. >> it is great news, but surprising. >> the norwegian jury seemed to be trying to bolster europe in its hour of need, reminding europeans of what had been achieved. opinion polls show that the eu is unloved by many europeans and the european project is still under threat from a debt crisis that has yet to be fixed. bbc news, brussels'. >> and the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton issued her congratulations to the eu after meeting with the italian prime minister. the discussed some pressing issues including syria and iran. for more on their talks, italy's prime minister joins me now. thank you for coming in. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> is it ironic that the european union wednesday peace prize just as it is under great crisis? >> i think it is highly symbolic. it is a great integration beyond the economic integration of the union. that is going to remain a fundamental factor. the nobel prize has been awarded because they wanted to recognize the fundamental importance of the union in keeping peace and security in europe for the last half a century and in my view, it is a promise for the future. >> yes, the future of the european union. would you not admit it is under strain? >> it has been under strain. hopefully it is coming to an end. not an easy and. what is going to happen in the european council next week is going to strengthen the governments of the eurozone, but also the governments of the european union. >> and yet you can understand why the citizens of your are not necessarily a celebrating the peace prize tonight -- of europe are not as a salary -- not necessarily celebrating the peace prize tonight? >> i am sure many are celebrating. people are strong believers of the european union idea at the celebration is in our hearts. >> you discussed syria with hillary clinton, the u.s. secretary of state. it seems to be growing worse by the the. is there nothing you are going to do with the u.s.? >> we have to create conditions for a better agenda. i see the only way to a political solution for the syrian crisis. we have to work intensely with the countries of the region and the members of the security council to get them out of the present stalemate. the civil war is not going to go anywhere. it is only going to continue the massacres and the bloodshed that we have seen. it is important to work more intensely. >> but president assad is not interested in a political solution. >> that is why the international community must increase the pleasure on the regime. the thing -- the pressure on the regime. the thing about geneva, it is extremely important. we are supporting this action and this is an element of the conversation. >> you must have also talked about iran. what can you tell us about the new sanctions against iran that the european union is likely to announce next rate? what will they be? >> the goal is to increase the pressure so of the iranian regime will finally come to the negotiating table with substantive ideas on how to stop the enrichment of uranium to a level that is incompatible with the civilian nuclear program. sanctions are probably going to be an chris. -- increase. >> is there anything about which areas? >> the financial sector. these are possibilities to be considered. >> thank you for joining us in the studio. greg thank you. >> still to come on tonight's program -- 50 years after the cuban missile crisis, the bbc has exclusive access to information that reveals it was even greater than the new. to africa now, and a legal case that could have implications across the continent. women in botswana are now able to legally inherit the family home. previously only men could inherit, leaving women homeless. >> it is a decision women will be delighted about across botswana. according to the law, women and girls are not allowed to inherit property. this left them at the mercy of male relatives. many lost the rights to any prop.. did judge of the high court hearing says law had no place in modern society. >> we very much welcomed the ruling. i think it is a huge step forward, not only in botswana, but throughout the southern half of the region. it is not just botswana that has these discriminatory laws. it is other countries like malawi. this sends a signal hopefully to the region that these kinds of discriminatory laws should no understand. >> discrimination against women exists in many african societies. in uganda, legally married wives are entitled to 15% of the state, with only 1% going to the customary air. the rest goes to the children. in nigeria, the constitution guarantees equality for women. however, women tend to lose property inheritance rights. the ruling in today's case highlights the broader issue of women's rights in africa and there will be many across the continent who will be watching with interest. bbc news. >> 90 minutes in the limelight, but last night the u.s. is presidential candidates made the most of the time. and paul ryan and joe biden came prepared for a verbal wrestling match and they delivered. mark marell has this report. >> in kentucky, they know all about neck-and-neck thoroughbred contest. nervous eyes were on the debate in this state. as it got under way, there was little time for niceties'. the veteran democratic warrior went in hard, repeatedly swinging at the republican young hero. >> we don't want to embolden our enemies to wait out for us and take over. >> that is a bizarre statement. 49 of our allies -- hear me. 49 of our allies signed on to this position. >> they argued about jobs, about tax, about the state of the economy in by an's home town. >> do you know what the unemployment rate in scranton is today? >> i sure do. >> 10%. that is how it is going all around america. >> that is not how it is going. >> joe biden of more than made up for the president's passivity in his debate. he chuckled. he never stopped grinning to drive from the impression his opponents' arguments were a joke. >> what would my friend do differently? if you notice, he never answers the question. >> we would not refer to bashar al-assad as a reformer when he is killing civilians with russian-provided weapons? we would not be outsourcing foriegn policy to the united nations coming giving vladimir putin veto power over us. >> lively stuff, but spectators seemed divided. neither man stumbled. either lost. the pressure is still on. the president needs to put in a flawless performance in the next debate to redeem his reputation as the front runner. bbc news, kentucky. >> all eyes are on tuesday's presidential debates. it was a dangerous showdown that gripped the united states 50 years ago. it was october 28, 1962 when the cuban missile crisis threatened to turn the cold war into a hot one. the bbc has gained exclusive access to new information that shows there was the second stage to the crisis. >> the cuban missile crisis did not end on october 28, 1962. cuba was going to become a nuclear power right under the nose of the united states, 90 miles from florida. >> there was a lot of attention for at least another three weeks and until that moment, we were at the highest state of alert short of nuclear war. >> i call upon chairman khrushchev. he has the opportunity to world the world back from the abyss of destruction. >> people around the world. the sigh of relief in october 1962 when soviet president nikita khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear weapons from cuba. but in a total failure of intelligence, the u.s. was blind to the existence of tactical nuclear weapons. meanwhile, negotiations -- castro began to see some cooperation with the soviets. >> castro is very angry at the soviet the trail. it sounds like the soviets made a concession after concession to the americans and never consulted with their cuban allies. >> chris jeff was afraid -- christoph was afraid -- the kicker's job was afraid. he sent his most trusted ally, the soviet premier. >> he said the dissent would be strong. and you cubans would have the authority to use these weapons. >> but privately, the soviet premier was having doubts about letting castro anywhere near the nuclear weapons. >> he understands that with cuban pride and with the way the cubans saw a possible nuclear war very differently from the way the soviets saw that it would be very dangerous and irresponsible to leave these weapons in cuban hands. >> by mid november, castro had become belligerent towards both washington and moscow. decision to shoot at low-flying american planes -- gradually the soviet premier comes to his own decision that he made by himself that tactical nuclear weapons will have to be removed. >> this is the first time the notes of the meeting have been revealed. >> to see the cuban leader basically beg the soviet premier to leave what he thought of as the last defense against the united states in cuba, but the soviet premier does not been. he says no, we cannot. all nuclear weapons are leaving cuba. >> had we invaded and the tactical nuclear missiles had been used, 100,000 u.s. soldiers would have been killed instantly. >> during december 1962, both kennedy and nikita khrushchev to acknowledge how close they came to nuclear war. chris jeff wrote to kennedy, proposing that they work to eliminate nuclear weapons by the end of kennedy's second term. it was never to be. >> reporting on a crisis that was even more grave than we'd thought. that brings today is programmed to close. you can find constant updates on our website. make sure to check our facebook page. from all of us here at world news america, thank you for watching. have a great weekend. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
WHUT
Oct 17, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> barack obama comes out fighting in the second debate of the u.s. presidential campaign. he was playing catchup afternoon mitt romney's performance in the first. >> i had a question, how much did you -- >> do you want me to -- >> you will get your chance in a moment. i'm still speaking. >> mr. president. i'm still speaking. >> i'm sorry. >> hello and welcome to gmt. i'm george al guya. the new round sparked in america. two servicemen accused of remain. >> and cambodians pay their respect to a man who died on monday. >> it's midday here in london. 6:00 p.m. in -- and early morning in new york where the spin doctors have been hard at work after the second debate in the second debate of the presidential campaign. barack obama came out fighting, because he had to. the debate comes at a crucial time. he has seen support drop in a swing state. >> if barack obama was listless in the first debate as many commentatorsal suggested that behind the traditional handshake with his challenger this time, was a president clearly more determined. that that was no mariano rivera evident than when mitt romney accused him of taking two weeks to say the attack was terrorism. >> there was no demonstration involved. it was a terrorist attack. and it took a long time for that to be told to the american people. >> mr. romney questioned whether the american people might have been misled. the president snapped back that he talked about terrorism the day after the attack. >> the suggestion that anybody on my team whether it was the secretary of state, our u.n. ambassador, anybody on my team would play politics or mislead when we have lost four of our own, governor, is offensive. that's not what we do. >> responding row bestly on domestic issues. >> the president has tried, but his policies haven't worked. he is great as a speaker and describing his plans and visions. that's wonderful, except we have a record to look at. and that record shows that he just hasn't been able to cut the deficit and put in place reforms for medicare and social security to preserve them -- >> governor romney, here's what we did. >> president obama hit back with his economic proposals and said romney wants folks at the top to play by a different set of rules. did his performance help him this time? >> a few points scored here and there. but i didn't find either candidate particularly captivating. i do think president obama might have had the edge over governor romney. >> three weeks to election day. one more debate to come with the stakes now higher than ever. mike woolridge, "bbc news." >> all right. let's leave that and take a look at some of the other headlines making way around the world. the taliban have attacked a military base causing several casualties. the base was involved a suicide bomber and a vehicle packed with plosist. the taliban said others were on the base with machine guns and rocket launchers. >> there were allegations in a new report from human rights that looks at the last hours of the libyan dictator. rebels stay he was killed in crossfire during the battle. investigators in america have searched the premises of a massachusetts pharmaceutical company linked to a menen jithes outbreak. 16 people have died apparently after using con contaminate nated drugs from the firm. now the u.s. ambassador to japan said he shares the anger felt in japan over the alleged remain of a woman by two servicemen. two american sailors were arrested on tuesday after japan's defense minister described their actions as abhorrent. it is likely to less at any idea of a base on -- in that area. >> to what extent might we say relations between the two countries have been affected because of this? >> well, you're right to point out that this is at the moment an allegation of a remain. -- of a reign judging -- of a rape though you wouldn't have thought so by the coverage it's getting in japan. you can see by the u.s. ambassador scrambling to go to the foreign ministry to make an apology to the japanese people. the reason it's so serious is because these bases are a problem the oaky now wans are sick and tired of having close to 50,000 troops squeezed on to their island. they want them removed and have been campaigning to have them removed and 10 years ago they thought they had an agreement to have at least half of them removed, but that hasn't happened so people describe okinawa as a bit of a tinderbox and something like this could set off an angry reaction from the locals. >> there's never a good time to have this sort of thing happen but there doesn't seem to be a worse time given the tensions. >> of course we've seen in the last few weeks tensions between japan and china in particular but also japan and korea and japan and taiwanal heighten over a number of territorial disputes over islands and shown how significant this military presence by america is in this part of the world for keeping the peace. but also how och in a with a is the biggest u.s. base in this part of the world. it is a key strategic u.s. asset for deploying military forces around the region. but of course with the rise of china with a major military power and now increaseingly a naval power, it's something the united states and japan clearly want america to hold on to and want america to stay here. >> now tens of thousands of mourners line the streets to pay their last respects as the coffin carrying the former king passed by. the form monarch will lie in state for three months. it marked for start of the official mourning. he died of a heart attack in beijing on monday at the age of 89. let's go now to our correspondent, johnathan. jonathan, the crowds i've been talking about, a sign of how much respect the people had for their king. >> that respect went right across the generations. he abdicated in 2004 even before then, though, he stayed out of the country for long periods of time. he often went back to china where he felt comfortable. but even the younger people recognized that he is almost the definition of cambodian identity. this man became king in 1941, 71 years ago anded that most extraordinary career in life. he was -- he abdicated twice and deposed by a koup once and at one point he was in alliance with another group and cambodians see him as a man who represents their history and does have that aura. they see him something of a spiritual figure. they call him king father. so there were people from young to old out there saying he is very, very important. whatever people think of his volatile personality and sometimes inconsistent track record, he is an enormous man for us and they are really feeling a tremendous sense of loss that an era has gone with his passing. >> you talk about the young people and how they, too, have been moved by this. and of course they won't know some of the more turbulent times that the king presided over. i'm thinking in particular, as you mentioned just now, the kumer period. >> that's an interesting period because he allowed himself to be used by them and allied himself with them before they came to power and was their prisoner in the four years they destroyed the country but then aligned himself with them when they were fighting against the other government here. history is quite carefully taught here in cambodia. you don't get a very good look at all the complex twists and turns but cambodia anchored him as a man who played such an essential three he is beyond touch. older people i thought today were genuinely distraught. they remembered him from a golden mira. you saw people absolutely breaking down in tears and simply saw this was a great man of a different era and are very unlikely to see a man like him again. with all his foibles he was always there and stood up for their nationality and i think they realize he was a real champion of their identity. >> we'll leave it there. jonathan head. >> the hated exit permits people had to get before traveling abroad, it's the latest in a series of slow social and economic changes on the communist-run island. reporting now from havana. >> for over 50 years every cuban wanting to travel from this island had to ask permission and stay away too long and you would lose your right to return. >> from january all cubans need to go abroad is a visa. so all the permit paperwork cost over $300. well over a year's salary for a state worker. so it's no wonder people are happy here. >> i am very happy. really happy. because we can now see our families. we can reunite and come and go just like everywhere else in the world. >> january 2, 1959. >> cuba closed its wars soon after the 1959 era. travel restrictions for some like doctors will remain and there's ample room in the new rules to stop government critics from traveling , too, but will others rush for the exit? only if other countries relax their visa laws and only if those cubans can afford the airfare. the government explains the change saying most cubans want to travel for economic reasons not politics seeblinging the work and wealth they struggle to find here. the hope is they will travel and return bringing much-needed money and skills back to the island. opening its borders is a gamble after so many years of tight control, but cuba is changing slowly and this is a much awaited part of that. sarah, "bbc news," havana. >> and still to come on gmt. with violence in serbia strks junior english team accusing the crowd of racial abuse. >> police this spain have arrested scores of people accused of those involved in money laundering. the chinese mafia they claim laundered up to 300 million euros a year and extortion and prostitution were involved. >> this crackdown was swift and unannounced. as this police video shows, suspects were rounded up without ceremony. businesses across the country and 6 million euros in cash and items of jewelry and pieces of artt. >> people who witnessed the raids were shocked. >> this woman said she'd seen policemen knocking down walls to enter premises and make arrests. >> more footage without sound shows a business being raided and the safe broken open. it followed a two-year investigation. suspects have been rounded up. with so much money at stake the chinese have sent a clear signal to bring all those involved to justice. james kell yes, "bbc news." >> the australian prime minister took a tumble. julian gillard was on her final day when she slipped and lost her shoe. the visit is aimed at boosting ties between the two countries. she joked abou wearing heels. >> i'm fine. for men who get to wear flat shoes all day, every day, if you wear a heel, it can get embedded in soft grass and then when you pull your foot out, the shoe doesn't come and the rest of it is as you saw. >> this is gmt from "bbc world news." i'm george. the headlines. president obama and the erepublican challenger, mitt romney went back and forth on taxes and energy policy during their second televised debate before next month's election. the british government is calling for top sanctions after england's -- saying they were racially abused. it's about that time when we catch up on all the business news. alex is here. i want to start with germfully. because new growth figures out in the last hour, not so good. and it raises questions, doesn't it? if the u.n. power house is stumbling a bit. what does that say about the euro zone? >> we're very used to hearing that description, power house. so it's hugely worrying for the euro zone as a whole. we have relied on germany to steer europe through recent troubles and the slowing growth we're seeing outside as well as in the emerging markets, and within the last hour the government has slashed its growth forecast from 1.6 to 1%. that despite a small increase it's predicting for late they are year. >> that's a big drop, isn't it? >> it is. early earlier i spoke to sister economist and he explains that this is actually hugely worrying for the euro zone as a whole. >> clearly germany is supposed to be the engine for recovery. the fact that it's going to grow fairly anemic has suggested the region as a whole is in for a rough time over the next few months. >> so a slow, painful period of growth. >> the european commission reports, and it's quite a congregated issue but they are trying to put a cap on what crops are grown for biofuel. food prices have been shooting up and there's a sense that the energy market and food market are in competition with each other. >> yes. this is the first time they have directly been competing. the european commission on how to address these growing concerns that we have seen over the past years about rising fuel costs. food is being used to turn into fuel so food prices have gone up. and some biofuels are not quite as environmentally friendly as we thought. for its part the biofuel industry has insisted any levies or caps placed on the number of crops will cost thousands of jobs and cost the industry millions as a whole. earlier we spoke to the head of the farmers union and he said it's hard to know how the respond to please the market and european regulations. >> in the u.k., in europe and in all the developed agriculture, we're looking into markets. what has happened in the last two or three years is the supply and demand for food and food for fuel agriculture has altered things those that cast gated farm for overproduction say now we want you to produce something we won't because we're concerned about food prices. >> taking place in brussels and the farmers here and across europe are affected. >> thank you. >> the british government is calling for tough sanctions after claims that england's under 21 football players were racially abused ein their match against serbia. the uafa president has been written to. a mas brawl erupted between opposing players and coaches after england won the playoff 1-0. they also allege they were pelted with coins and seats. vladimir is the sports editor at b 92 radio in belgrade. >> it was a really badtempered game. everything was ok until the english team went in the last minute and then all went wrong. serbian supporters claim that they were provoked by some of the english players, and what followed was really, really ugly. i suppose you saw the scenes. fighting all over. it was many things. >> well, let's speak now to our correspondent in the capital of belgrade. i don't know how much of that you heard. he called it ugly but that's something of an understimet, isn't it? >> yes. and vladimir's own organization b 92 is described as a scandal on their website and another popular media outlight a popular tabloid got footage of what went on and the headline serbian shame and talking about a racist riot. so actually the reaction here has been in some ways every bit as fures as we're seeing from the united kingdom. i think people are embarrassed by it. serbian supporters have been embarrassed. serbian fans were throwing flares on the pitch and in the crowd and five years ago a similar incident involving racism. people have had enough of it, i think. >> you say people have had enough and are embarrassed but begs the question, does it not, i mean, you can't get serbian supporters behaving like this if there wasn't some kind of wider culture that tolerated this type of culture. >> you hit the nail on the head. there's been a lot of tieup between the ultra nationalist movement and those as anywhere else hold on to certain ideas of ethnic purity and may explain why you see some of the ugly scenes as we did last night. the problem is, there's been a strong hand coming down whether it's the football or government authorities we saw earlier rather than assist people organizing a gay pride mar in which belgrade, they were being threatened by ultra nationalists, the government responded by banning the march supposedly due to public safety and these are the sort of messages sent out, and until there are stronger messages, this is going to continue. >> now at least 10 policemen have been injured in the coast region of 10 people. two suspects were killed in the fight following the attack. a spokesperson said al sha bod loyalists may have been behind the incident. a panel of experts eye accused the rowanden defense minister of organizing a conflict and says rwanda is continuing to support the n 23 rebels who have been fighting in eastern drc since april. rwanda has repeatedly denied the accusations. trying to negotiate an end to the miners strike which has spread since august. about 80,000 mine workers are striking in a an area crucial to the south african economy. now an air canada passenger flight bound for sidney helped pinpoint the location of a yacht in trouble off the coast of australia. the alarm had been raised after a captain called for help. the maritime safety authority asked two party airliners to help. their plane swooped down at about 1,200 meters while the crew peered out using binoculars borrowed from passengers. all right. let me give you a quick reminder of our top story on gmt. u.s. president barack obama and mitt romney have clashed in their second televised debate. more on the debate and comments in the next half-hour. so do stay with us here on "bbc world news." >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you -- to guide you through the opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los presented by kcet, los angeles
PBS
Oct 16, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is bbc world news. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news. >> and this is bbc world news america reporting from washington the biggest military half of all time -- the biggest military hack of all time. claiming the war crimes -- ready for round the two? the u.s. presidential candidates heading to their second presidential debate and the stakes are high. welcome around the globe. the man accused of carrying out the biggest hack ever -- but today the british government ruled it will not extradite him to america. a battle waged on behalf of mr. mckinnon who's been diagnosed with as burgers a syndrome. >> he could not speak. >> her and her mother revealed how her son reacted. >> hiking and trying. it is so emotional. >> the joy and relief of a parent who has been fighting the u.s. government for one decade. >> [inaudible] >> he does not deny the u.s. charges. from 10 years ago, he carried out what one u.s. prosecutor described as the biggest military computer hack of all time. his supporters say he is a young man with a mild autism, simply looking for information on ufo's. when supporters across the political spectrum and public life. david cameron raised his case with president obama to reassess his medical condition. this is he was in serious risk of committing suicide if forced to attend a trial in united states. >> i have concluded that mr. mckinnon's extradition would arise to a high risk of him ending his life. the decision to extradite would be incompatible with his human rights. i therefore withdraw the extradition order. it will now be -- >> cheers and clapping in the commons but today's announcement will be treated differently in the pentagon. in the months before 9/11, he hacked into the military. he wrote that the u.s. foreign policy is akin to government- sponsored terrorism. i will continue to disrupt. >> the united states was disappointed it. we are examining the details of the decision. >> it is not the end of the road. the home secretary has made it clear he could face charges in this country. she wants to reform the extradition process to make it fairer. >> if the message goes out that britain sees extradition as a one-way street, the other countries will also start saying, why should we cooperate with britain? but they will accept medical reasons for not doing extradition. >> two weeks ago the home office was celebrating the success one of the four was accused of computer-related activity. and they have accused the government of double standards. bbc news. >> for more on today's decision, i spoke with that jane. what is the reaction here in washington? >> they are safe united states is officially disappointed in this decision. it has, after all, been looking to extradite him for 10 years it was described -- for 10 years. it was described as the greatest military hack of all time. this been embarrassing because he was able to do it not so long after the 9/11 attacks. it is more than disappointing, if not a furious. he did say he was looking for u.s. "'s. -- ufo's. we saw them extradited earlier this month. think their reaction would have been much stronger >> my understanding is they take a cyber terrorism -- then a much stronger. >> my understanding is that they take cyber terrorism seriously. >> yes. when it comes to cyber crime, why not prosecute people who allegedly commit these crimes in the u.k. and not in the u.s.? that may be something we start to see on the future. this was an exceptional and our treaty -- >> he should be praised with working peace and not a war crimes. crimes against humanity in the 1990 posies. he alleged today that he had faked the notorious shelling in which more than 100 people died. >> of the international criminal tribunal is now in session >> he brought his old war-time certainties' to court. he showed not a hint of self doubt. he should be -- he said he should be praised and not prosecuted because he was never allowed the smallest crime. he said he had reduced suffering and showed mercy. he said he was not an aggressive man. in the public galleries, survivors of the war shouted, lies. the tories concentration camps or fate, he said, for the foreign media. he was in one such camp in 1992. this was him today. he left in tears. >> i felt sad and humiliated. it is not sure that what happened to us and that campbell was a fake. >> in 1994, he claimed this was also fake. he claimed that some of the bodies were mannequins. >> as -- a shameless orchestration. obviously, some people were killed by that explosion. but we also saw and joint manikins being grown on to trucks, creating this show for the world. >> 8000 men and boys were murdered. there were no indications that anyone had been killed. he had given an order that all civilians were to be rid protected. his case is that the firm had no choice. they had been faced with genocide before and were threatened with genocide again. all members of the international community came with such prejudice, that there was nothing we could do. >> did some of the crimes he was accused of happened that is beyond a doubt. can he prove his innocence when the killed of some many others is already established? bbc news. >> in at the nile and the defiant of there. in other news from around the world, -- in a denial and defiance of others. in other news, was charged with providing support of terrorism in guantanamo bay. the conviction cannot stand because supporting terrorism is not a war crime. she has become the first woman and the first of britain to become the coveted man. she just described to as the greatest prose writing. the art of historical fiction. reconstructive surgery for the 14-year-old pakistan in girl who was shot by the caliban -- by the taliban. she could make a good recovery from her injuries. >> an initial medical assessments at the queen elizabeth hospital are now complete. immediate concern that the long journey from pockets done, where she had been stabilized might set her back. but doctors here say she had a comfortable night. >> we are very pleased with the progress she has made a so far. she is showing every sign of being just as every bit of strong as we are believed to believe she is. >> security here is becoming an issue with several incidents reported overnight. >> i understand the number of people turned up claiming to be her family, and they have been a arrested. >> police are playing down the incident saying that no one was arrested and is was just some well-wishers who were told they cannot go and see her. hospital employees say a woman did try to get through and say she was her mother. >> what they might not have been any threats in this incident, there is a very visible security presence here. the police are taking no chances. and for good reason. it is feared that if taliban militants could try again to kill her. and today, they issued a statement describing her as a spy of the west. for her, that means even if she does make a good recovery, it to be extremely difficult for her to return to pakistan. bbc news, birmingham. >> extraordinarily -- extraordinary that security cons -- security concerns could follow a 14-year-old girl. traveling back in time 50 years after the cuban missile crisis. war could have been launched. drought, soaring prices, conflicts have left almost 19 million people in africa and able to see to their families or with little access to nutritious food. he has been to the ivory coast to look at the malnutrition in that country. >> it is known as hidden hunger. syria help the health care -- similar help the children who are, in reality, suffering from chronic malnutrition. they're not eating the right foods and that is leading to stunted growth, lower iq's, and less resistance from attracting potentially fatal diseases. debt now return to the ivory coast disputing the presidential election -- they have now returned to the coast after the presidential election. >> most of the time, mothers do not know what to give their young children. this is a message we need to give to spread the message of what nutrients to give babies and young children. >> it is here where they come to sell their foods for the best prices. that often means that their children back on the farms -- agencies here say that as confusing about 1/3 of children suffering from chronic malnutrition. >> in a nation where the wages -- per day, providing is difficult for some very -- for some. >> there are many problems of health with them. the food i by is not the best quality. it is not sufficient. >> for the struggling here to give their children the best art and life, that message -- the best start in life, that message is beginning to be received. richard conway, bbc news. >> two weeks ago, a 19-minute debate between president barack obama and governor mitt romney changed the american election. in a few hours' time, there will hold their second debate. mr. obama hopes he can swing in the race back in his favor. from new york. >> the president has something to prove to 9 in the last debate he seemed disengaged, passionless, and a tired. mitt romney attacked, and he failed to fight back. nearly 17 million americans watched and the opinion polls and narrowed. there is a lot to play for. >> when this started out, it looked like mitt romney thought he could get elected by not being barack obama. after a while, a look like obama could get reelected by not being met romney. it turns out that is not going to work for either of them. they have to give voters an affirmative reason to support them. >> i still fabulous. >> obama has been locked away with his team, preparing. in the past, this format has produced surprises. >> can he get things done? >> undecided voters will pose questions on both domestic and foreign affairs. >> they say the white house romney blamed the -- clinton and a video -- on a video. >> hillary clinton stepped in to take the blame. >> i'm in charge of the state department. the president and vice president certainly would not be knowledgeable about specific decisions that are made by security professionals. >> republican senators claimed the president should have known something like this was going to happen and that he bears full responsibility. strategists say it is a potent charge. >> it is a bit of a debacle. it is made to president looked incompetent on foreign policy. it is made his administration look like they don't know what they're doing. >> tonight's questions come from undecided voters from the area. the economy not foreign affairs may be the main concern. it is enthusiasm and vigor that are under scrutiny. >> he cannot perform -- afford another performance like last time. that would be difficult to recover from. >> a lot of pressure on barack obama tonight. the one thing the candidates to agree on is the american economy needs a boost. there are different policies on how that should be done. a short time ago -- he joined the from newport beach, california. as voters watch this debate and make their decision about the american election, what will be the biggest decision under president obama or a president romney? >> they will hear that there will be lots of differences, but the reality is a difference. at this stage, each candidate is trying to -- themselves. they do this by raising doubt about the other. look for romney to claim that obama will raise taxes across the board. look for obama to claim that romney will destroy the social safety net. the reality is that whoever wins in november will have a very small set of policies they can pursue if they want to put this economy back on track. there will have to do a bit of both. this " reform on the tax side and the expenditure side. >> on a camping trip with her for mitt romney that he will be much more aggressive about cutting the federal deficit. will he do that? >> no. he is going to have to recognize that if he goes too far, he will undermine this recovery that america is going through right now. at the end of the day, there's only a small set of measures that can be taken. the main question is on the economic side. the main question will be on the social side. what social judgments are made to accompany where there is a rather limited set of economic options. >> is there a difference there? i saw your economic decisions cause social changes. the difference between the two administrations, what would be the difference is if mitt romney was president and of barack obama has a second term? >> there is a fundamental difference in how each party views things. for the democrats, the average american has been hit by a rapid paradigm change and any time to adjust. you need to have the social safety net to help people adjust. for the republican side, it is very different. get the government out of the way an individual and just very quickly and they will find their own self assurance. these are fundamentally different characterization's. >> very balanced. what about the jobs and growth? that is what they are going to be very focused on is their own jobs situation. will that change of the two different presidents? >> the good news is that the economy is healing. consumer sentiment, retail sales, and jobless claims -- the all confirm the u.s. economy is healing. the head winds from europe are not too strong. it is a fundamental issue that i, as a parent, worries about. if we're careful, our children's generation may be worse off than our spirit that as of the americas not face for over a century. >> this summer, they did a survey of business leaders here in america and business leaders around the world. business leaders around the world say they prefer barack obama. business leaders in america say they would prefer mitt romney. why do people abroad have a different opinion on the economic side? >> i think because president obama has tried to engage more. has tried to recognize that the u.s. has a global responsibility. that the u.s. cannot dictate on the foreign-policy side. think that is much more reassuring. >so, i can understand with that comes from. the domestic view is very different. >> mohamed el-erian, the ceo of pimm code. today marks half a century since the start of the cuban missile crisis. wise -- widely seen as the closest we ever come to nuclear war. they were there because cuba fear that america was planning to invade and topple its socialist revolution. today, the missiles have gone and socialism has not. >> taking a ride back in time on the trail of the cuban missile crisis. i came to the countryside looking for traces of october, 1962 when the world came the closest ever to nuclear war. there were fragments of that passed in strange places here. parts of a concrete silo made to store nuclear warheads. reaching the main site takes a tracek into the hillside. up here is reappointed missiles at america. but this historian tells me the whole crisis could have been avoided. >> i think the soviets could have disguised missiles with tobacco or chicken. it is one of the incomprehensible aspects of the crisis that they barely took any camouflage measures. >> the military base was spotted by the americans. 50 years ago, this was the silo where they tap 12 nuclear warheads. it was a valid act of self- defense, but it brought the two superpowers at the time to debate the strength of nuclear war. six days after seeing a real images, president kennedy announced a naval blockade of cuba. >> i direct the final -- the current steps be taken immediately. >> they protected cuba opposing revolution. it was a high-risk strategy. near the launch site, locals recollect the days. >> if something had gone wrong, it was all over. these were two huge powers are to the teeth. it was serious. >> no more so when a u.s. plane was shot down near cuba. two years -- two days later it was removed. in return, president kennedy pledged not to invade cuba. >> we emerged stronger. we had won another battle. the americans did not invade. we are just a little island. if they are the most powerful country in the world, but we are still here. >> but it could so easily have ended otherwise. bbc news, havana. >> you can follow all the actions at the second presidential debate on our web site. from all this year, thank you for watching. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. at union brink, -- at union bank, our finance a manager's guide you. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? by kcet los angeles.
WHUT
Oct 9, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> flying, chancellor angela merkel can expect a hostile reception as she arrives in greece. and the greek prime minister as he struggles to impose yet more austerities. hello and welcome to gmt. i'm george al guya with a world of news and opinion. also in the program, north korea plex flexes its military muscles and claims its missiles can now reach the u.s. mainland. >> next time it's for real. the -- they vow to go faster and further than before. it's midday in london. angela merkel has just arrived for her first visit in five years in greece. the greece she will see this time around will see people mired in -- some of the anger is toward angela merkel. so why is she there? here's our correspondent. >> she arrived for her first visit to greece in over five years. touching down in the euro zone's most indebted nation. she stayed away before critical of the slow performance but now a show of support. large parts of athens were cordened off. a sign of the rage against a leader many see as driving the painful spending cuts. protests before her arrival had banners and slogans against angela merkel. germany has insisted on those cutbacks before austerity relief was given. >> we want to form a strong partnership with especially germany. >> it was the greek prinal minister's visit that laid down citizenshiplations. for the prime minister, seeking to rebuild greece's credibility, it's of huge importance. from ordinary greeks, no welcome, just strikes and planned protests. reviled by many few foreign leaders elit license it such a reaction here. >> let's hope it's for the best, and her coming here to greece, she will see first hand what the greeks are going through and the reduction in their standard of living. and she can form an opinion. let's hope we are not the guinea pigs of europe. >> she should see how we are suffering and the diet and how there is no future. >> as this makes the sinks foote into its worst crisis in modern history, angela merkel is to have been one everyone wants to blame. now she is flying into the lion's den. >> let's go live to the square outside the greek parliament. these are live pictures. despite that massive police presence, something like 6,000-7,000 police officers on the street, this is are demonstration that's being allowed. and we have seen some of these demonstrations turn violent, the opposition not just to the austerity package but much of it directed at the german leader, angela merkel. she will be there four or five hours. we'll monitor the square and see how things develop as time goes by. of course it's not just greeks facing hardship. the latest figures from the international monetary fund say the world economic recovery is slow. more on that in a few minutes. north korea says it has developed missiles capable of hitting the u.s. mainland and is not afraid to use them. they can hit the u.s. and neighboring areas. they say -- for the timing of the statement, it's raised some eyebrows. it comes just two days after south korea said it tripled the range of its missiles meaning the south missiles would now be able to reach all of north korea. well, joining me from seoul is john, an associate fellow with the asia program watt the chatham house of think tank. thank you for being with us. first of all, let's talk about this claim from north korea. is it at all credible? >> well, it's credible in the sense that north koreans have in developing their ballistic missiles developed their technology but still very much a technology that hasn't demonstrated what they and north korea have been claiming. when they claimed to launch satellite to extend their ballistic missile to say they could hit the u.s. some would say is not a reality yet. >> when someone is exacting a claim like, this you know what i mean washington and seoul would have factoried that in. simply the problems of the technical capacity -- >> absolutely. i think this is probably much more, if we want to explain it, a case of political rhetoric. the north feel compelled in the face of the extension of the missile capabilities and the result of the disagreement with the americans demonstrate they can respond in a way but perhaps most importantly, the military. we have seen the succession from kim oni will had a shift in central gravity. and yet the military remains an important actor in the north korean political environment, and i think what we're seeing is a government seeking to assure its key constituents and to send a signal to the outside world in the face of what they consider pressure from the south and the government is strong and the national security of the north korea the safe. >> it's given that the south has only increased its missile capacity. >> absolutely. and i think we need to trecks last few months have been very tense on the korean peninsula, and there's been no love lost and the outgoing president is seen as someone who is hostile to the north and that certainly is how the knot paints him. this is very much a political gang waiting for the political senses of december and north koreans are not going to give an inch until they see the new president taking over in january. but for now, as you say, they have every reason to take a tough stance. >> thank you for your time on gmt. let's take a look at some of the other stories making hirnes around the world today. mexican authorities say the leader of the drug cartel appears to have been killed in a fire fight with marines. final forensic tests are being carried out to confirm it is one of mexico's most wanted men. the u.s. had offered $5 million for his capture. lawyers representing the libyan government tell the international criminal court that gaddafi should be tried in his home country. he is accused of committing more crimes against the rebels who overthrew his father last year. they are expected to argue he would not receive a fair trial in libya. american scientists say they are upset about the debris arriving a 200-ton dock was found to be carrying 100,000 species that threaten local marine life. and still to come on gmt, celebrations in uganda will be live as the east african nation marks 50 years of independence. >> a secret agent who infiltrated the i.r.a. on behalf of british securities says ehe's been abandoned by those he served and left with mental health problems as a result. he has lived under a false identity for almost 30 years after revealing sensitive information in one of the biggest criminal trials in irish and british history. colin campbell reports. >> raymond gilmore infiltrated the i.r.a. at the height of the troubles in i.r.a. and later earned himself an i.r.a. death sentence. >> i brought them to their knees. and saved countless amount of lives. >> but living under a false identity for almost 30 years he says he has been failed by the international services. the contract between the government. we served during dirtiest war. >> for some, though, raymond gilmore is still remembered as a traitor, guilty of betrayal. with the assistance of his m.p. he is now taking his case to the tribunal a body which exams complaints against the international services. >> is this just about money? >> in. no. not at all. it's about the betrayal of the international security forces against me. >> raymond gilmore accepts speaking out could endanger his life but he has been left with little choice. >> you can continue to have your say on that story or others on gmt today. just go to our facebook page and there you can comment on our latest stories and look at our photo galleries from our traveling correspondents. >> the address is facebook.com/bbcworldnews. >> this is gmt from "bbc world news," i'm george al guya. the headlines. germany's chancellor angela merkel has arrived in greece. many believe she is the author of the country's austerity. north korea warns its long-range missiles are capable of hitting the american mainland. well, let's catch up on the business news now with aaron. we have been looking at those problems in greece. greece is apparently not alone, in fact the whole world is kind of in trouble. and more evidence of this kind of shift to the emerging market. >> absolutely. a i shift of wealth. this is a stark warning. the international monetary fund and the latest assessment. saying look unless the u.s. and europe and the global economy could fall into a steeper slowdown. they are saying confidence is being damaged. damaged confidence that discourages businesses from investing and damaged confidence stops consumers from spending. so the i.m.f. downgraded the overall growth for this year to 3% in july. so only a few months they had to downgrade the forecast basically. the i.m.f. also highlighted what you and i spoke about yesterday. the new rescue fund, the permanent rescue fund for the euro zone. they said it's very important and the leaders need to start using that fund to rescue banks. in terms of the united states, the i.m.f. was blunt and said congress needs to sit down and sort out the budget in a nutshell saying everything the leaders have done so far is just not enough and the emerging economies, china, which they downgraded. they used one phrase only, a common factory. listen to this. >> which applies to the revision in most emerging market countries is exports. they are not doing great. and the striking thing in the world in which we are is that when -- the effect on trade. the effect on exports from emerging market countries is very, very strong. >> i will defend one of the sharpest downgrades in the world with rough here in the u.k. >> good news. >> u.s. secretary and ben bernanke, head of the fed. they are in india. what are they doing there? >> very important meeting forging stronger economic ties but we already know the u.s. and india have a strong alliance but this alliance needs to be that much more stronger and important given both economies are combating the rising clout of china. there's a lot to talk about and there's a lot to be done. in particular on the indian side. let's raymond everyone that india was once the growing darling but an economy that's got disappointing investors and shackeled with red tape and corruption as well. so the question is will the u.s. apply that much more pressure on the indian government get these reforms through and through fast? >> not so long ago by my bbc colleague and he basic live said yes, our economy hasn't grown as fast as expected and no one else's has but we're still slightly better than the rest. the fact is india is also looking at the election and not 1 1/2 or slightly before that. so there's not a whole lot that the government can do, and i think everybody recognizes that. the market doesn't, so no one sees going to line up -- we do know the large supermarket chains, wal-mart has said they will be here within the next 12-18 months so that's one company that's looking to come here. >> and you know wall smart rubbing its hands waiting to get into china. >> yes. >> thank you. >> now, uganda is marking 50 years of independence from britain today. several african heads of state are joining home the celebrate the anniversary. supporters say the president whose been in power since 1986 has led uganda to peace but critics say he's muzzled the -- which will be boycotting the event. >> joining me live. what's the mood like today? plenty of celebration? >> yes. as you can hear behind me the music is devinning. the crowd, we heard them screaming and shouting. there had been loud celebrations. and the -- some of the country's biggest musicians have been performing. so it's been a very lively atmosphere so far. >> well yes, there, but the fact of the matter is the backdrop to all this isn't all that great. there's been massive inflation, food cuts. accusation, that he's holding down the opposition. >> yes. this celebration has been -- to celebrate their independence but also reflect on where the country has been over the past 50 years and some believe the president has stayed too long and the spending on health and education and infrastructure could be improved. that's why some of the opposition parties have chosen to boycott and protest instead, because they think these issues need to be highlighted. >> and regionally, katherine, there is an issue. we talked about things like that, that affect the cost of living and the government has been accused of disrupting the democratic republic of konga? >> yes. there's that said that the president has. and this is because uganda play ascii role in the region. there have been different accusations levied against it. but at the same time it's still seen as a powerful force in the region and the power america goes when it needs to negotiate with this area. but -- >> last week mitt romney put in a strong performance in the first of the tv presidential debates but with the election less than a month away, the republican candidate still needs every advantage to overtake president obama. foreign policy has been seen as a weakness. but he's now trying to turn it into a have -- into a strength. >> mitt romney is looking to close the gap between he and barack obama. he criticized the government for failing to lead during a time of upheaval. >> i know the president hopes for a freer middle east. aligned with us. i share this hope. but hope is not a strategy. we can't support our friends and defeat our friends in the middle east when our words are not backed up by deeds. last months attacks on the american consulates added they were likely the work of the same forces that attacked america on september 11, 11 years ago. >> with iran closer than ever to nuclear capability. >> the republican candidate said it was time to change course and said that he would put iran on notice and work more closely with our partners on the gulf. put more conditions on american aide and help the rebels in syria attain arms. but he gave few details and some of his proposals are already policy under the obama administration. the former governor stuck to his written speech and has stumbled before on policy. >> "the new york times" says -- >> the obama administration was quick to put out a campaign add that showed his short comings. president obama and mr. romney faced off in a debate last week focused on domestic policy but the two men will meet on stage twice more in the coming two weeks and debate america's role in the world. "bbc world news," washington. >> now in just over an hour, the daredevil felix baumgardner is due to jump from the edge of space in a record-setting skydiving attempt. if he succeeds he will become the first person to go faster than the speed of sound without an aircraft. reporting from rozz well, new mexico. >> he will be taken 23 miles up by balloon to the edge of space. he is so might go up that if his space suit leaks, his blood will boil. he will break sound barrier. no one knows the effects it will have on him. >> we practiced this. this is my biggest dream. we are one step closer. i feel good at the moment. >> felix came to fame as a young base jumper, hurling himself off tall buildings and notoriously off the giant jesus monument. this time he is helped by engineers and his suit is allowing him greater movement so he can glide during free fall. the capsule has been specially built to protect him from the freezing conditions of high altitude. this is the mission control center where engineers are making a final preparation for the jump. there's some tension but excitement. it's from here that they will track his vital signs and follow him as he falls to earth. the launch will be at a small airfield in rozz welle, new mexico. the balloon is 55 stories high and thinner than a plastic bag. felix will get in the capsule and once the wind drops, a crate releases it and a i way he'll go. the record was set 52 years ago by colonel joe kit injer. two people have died trying to break his record. colonel kitten jer is now helping felix, giving him support. re-living every moment of the mission. >> felix's mother and other family members and friends have come to wish felix luck and watch with pride as he falls further and faster than anyone who has fallen before. >> incredible. more on that amazing attempt in about 30 minutes when we will speak to a man who in 1999 became the first to complete a non-stop balloon ride around the globe. before we take a break, a reminder of our top story on gmt. of course it's -- these are live pictures looking from outside the parliament. the first time angela merkel has been to greece. for a lot of people in greece, chancellor angela merkel is being blamed with the austerity package with which they are dealing with. she is being blamed for these protests. something like 7,000 police officers have been out in the streets of athens to make sure this trip goes as smoothly as they hope. so do stay with us. there's plenty more on "bbc world news." back after a while. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los presented by kcet, los angeles
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Oct 4, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> turkey's retaliation against syria continues. a response after five turks died in the syrian attack across the border. a burial takes place and nato condemns the assad regime. welcome to gmt. david eades. coming up, with an audience of 50 million to impress, as romney gained ground on obama in the first of the televised presidential debates? >> it is not moral for my generation to keep spending more than we take in, knowing those burdens of will be passed on to the next generation. >> i promised i would fight every single day on behalf of the american people, the middle class, and all those striving to get into the middle class. kept that promise. >> also -- ♪ ♪ you know i love you >> 50 years since the beatles released their first single. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey where the parliament is in an emergency session over a bill of the rise across borders military operations in syria. turkey has already retaliated to the mortar attack that killed five people in a border town. despite international calls for restraint, that military response is still going on. reports that syrian soldiers may have been killed. now this report. >> the shelling of the turkish border town by syrian forces is a cause for deep anxiety. it's not the first time turkish territory has been hit by fire from syria, but the latest incident was the most serious. five civilians were killed. >> the dead people are my next- door neighbors who had been psychologically ruin during the past month and a half, adults and children. we cannot sleep overnight with the bombardment. >> turkey has strongly condemned the action by syria yesterday. it has taken the case to nato. in retaliation for the shelling, turkey has bombed a syrian army post. britain opposes foreign secretary, attending a conference in hungary today, says the longer the conflict in syria, the greater the danger. >> we all want to make sure there's no escalation of this incident. i think the response from turkey is circumstances. i want to express our solidarity with turkey, our valued nato partner, but we don't want to see an escalation from either side of the border. >> the funerals have been held for the turkish victims. a fresh reminder of the dangers of the violence in syria spilling over into a broader regional conflict. bbc news reporting. muir inore from jim beirut. this does escalate the potential for more to come. we heard about the attack on the syrian army post. i have seen some suggestion that some syrian soldiers may have been killed in that. do you have the latest? >> i don't have any direct information about casualties among syrians. several soldiers were reported killed near the border where the mortars were fired on wednesday . several soldiers killed. we don't have independent confirmation of that. but it's fairly likely, because the turks said they were using radar to pinpoint the sources of fire that had fired into turkey. the shelling has continued in the early morning, but we don't know whether it will continue. a lot will depend on that. whether the turks keep up the bombardment or whether they will feel their national honor has been satisfied. the other important thing to watch is for any kind of syrian reaction. they have not mention any casualties and their tone so far has been conciliatory, saying there is an investigation under way in syria as to how the fire went across the border into syria and extending condolences to the families of the turkish victims. >> it is a no-nonsense response. just in terms of the domestic realities for turkey and for the turkish government and the position they find themselves in , presumably, they would want to stop this. >> certainly, they don't want to get embroiled in a bilateral fight with the syrian regime on the ground. that has been clear from the beginning. there is a concerted nato division -- if there were a concerted nato decision to intervene, then turkey would support that, but it does not want to fight on its own . the dangers are evident. on the other hand, it is spilling across their border. they have tens of thousands of refugees to cope with and now they have their own citizens been killed on their own soil. so they felt clearly they had to respond to that. i suspect they will keep it to a minimum at the moment and yet keep open the option of hitting back harder if they feel they have to. >> thank you very much. could it be a moment which perhaps turns the u.s. presidential election campaign > -- ? the first televised debate has been widely judged a triumph for mitt romney, who had been lagging in opinion polls. he has often been called stiff and awkward in public, judy big -- yet he appeared more relaxed than the president. from washington now, this report. >> we welcome president obama and governor romney. >> up close and personal for the first time in the campaign, the president and head in the polls and his challenger under pressure to change the dynamics. it was mitt romney who went on the attack from the start. >> my party is putting people back to work in america. they are suffering in this country. we talk about evidence. look at the evidence of the last four years. it is extraordinary. we have 23 million people out of work under the president's policies and middle-income americans have been crushed. >> the president counterpunched on tax and spending, insisting romney would serve only the wealthiest americans. >> budgets reflect choices. we will have to make decisions. if we are asking for no revenue, then that means we have to get rid of a whole bunch of stuff and the magnitude of the tax cuts you are talking about, governor, would result in severe hardship for people, but more importantly, it would not help us grow. >> for much of the debate it was a talented who appeared more relaxed, more animated, even when cut short by the moderator. >> we are way over our first 15 minutes. >> the smile of a man enjoying himself. and then helped year, the president owes its signature a form which mitt romney wants to undo. >> i don't know how the president could have come into office facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment, an economic crisis at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion if fighting for obamacare for two years instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. it has killed jobs. >> if you appeal obamacare, and have become fond of the term, if you repeal it, the seniors right away would pay $600 more in prescription care. >> at times barack obama looked weary. as the dust settles, both sides will be fixated on the polls, with two more encounters still to come. bbc news, washington. >> a classics by ring in action or a common criminal case of smuggling? moscow insists there's no espionage after 11 people were charged in the u.s. with illegally exporting high-tech components with potential use in military systems to russian security agencies. one of them, and owner of companies in texas and moscow, was charged as operating in the u.s. as an unregistered agents of the russian government. real case?re's a >> at this stage they're not getting into the legal issues. they were just pointing out at a meeting this morning, one of the deputy foreign ministers pointed out that in his opinion the charges were not the espionage charges but criminal charges. they glossed over the fact that one of the men had been charged with acting as an unregistered agents of the russian government, which would be a spy, in many people's terms. not getting involved in the details of what was going on. one of the big companies involved is based in moscow and has denied there were involved in any type of espionage and they say their ordinary business men carrying out ordinary business activities. >> is there much known about alexander fishenko from moscow? " people are not prepared to discuss him here. he is originally from kazakhstan, originally a russian citizen, a naturalized american now with american citizenship and runs a big business in texas exported electronics, according to the fbi information. the fbi says what he was doing was purchasing very sophisticated electronics which are very useful in building weapons systems and weapons guidance systems and also radar systems. the electronics use a special licence. the allegations are that he was falsifying documents or not obtaining them at all and shipping all the electronics the moscow and then distributing them the weapons manufacturers, aircraft manufacturers, and to the successor to the kgb. analysis suggests that these electronics can be used in russian-made anti-ship missiles and fighter jets. they are buying electronics in america for those purposes. there has been a letter produced as part of the evidence in the case which seems to be from the ssb complaining that a batch of tips that had been provided by his company were faulty. that the evidence being presented to the judge. we will have to wait and see what the defendant has to say about it. >> that will be something to watch. thank you. still to come in the program, the job search is just beginning. we will hear how american graduates are struggling to find work. japan is seeking allies in the region as tensions with china continues over the disputed islands in the east china sea. the islands called senkaku in japan in japanese and diaoyu in china are claimed by china, japan, anti want. -- and to taiwan. japan's attempts to strengthen ties with south korea over this argument with china have complicated -- have become degraded by another set of islands. lucy williamson has been to the islands that are currently controlled by south korea. >> these islands behind me have caused all the recent tensions between south korea and japan. it is a pretty inhospitable place even on a sunny day like this. there's very little infrastructure. three people. live on the people they are more symbolic than real value to japan and south korea. both countries claimed the islands as their own, even though south korea has control over them. it's become a touchstone issue between the two countries. disputes have yet to be resolved. we have come here with the south korean government to hear their side of the story. both countries have gone to extraordinary lengths to prove their claims over these rocky outcrops. >> international space station is to be moved into a different orbit to avoid the possibility of a collision with a piece of space junk. the station will fire a booster rocket to avoid a fragment traveling at 17th thousand miles an hour. 21,000 pieces a potentially dangerous debris are orbiting the earth. let us know what you think about any of the stories here covering, not least the first presidential debate spir. get in touch with us. this is gmt from bbc world news. i am david eades. turkey has fired shells across the border into syria after five turkish civilians were killed by assyrian mortar attacks. the first u.s. presidential election debate between president obama and mitt romney focused on the economy. americans are about $1 trillion in student loans -- owe $1 trillion. despite the huge investment in their education, almost half of recent university graduates are either unemployed or underemployed and many worry about the future. which candidate will they support? our correspondent has this report from philadelphia. >> mack has just qualified as a lawyer, so now taken put his lawbooks away and turn his attention to is $170,000 student debt. >> the whole gravity of it really did not hit me until about a few months ago when all of a sudden it was like, that's not just a number, that is actually a representative of something. so the joke has always been, well, i bought a house. but really it is a little bit more than that. unable to find a job, he's moving to texas to live with his parents and is not thrilled about it. >> i am 27 years old. even though it is rather typical of people, it is still not culturally normative. >> americans of $1 trillion in student loans and they are struggling to find work -- owe $1 trillion. at temple university, students appear being trapped in low- paying jobs. >> i hope for the best, but i know from previous experience, a brother graduated from penn state with high grades but has been searching for jobs and cannot seem to find anything. >> the student vote helped get president obama into the white house four years ago. he is still likely to win much of their vote, but gone is the message of hope and change. the american dream has been a part of this election, because many people fear that it's under threat. no more slogans on campuses like this one where students worry they will be worse off than their parents. do you worry about being worse off? >> yes, almost every day. i am fearful that i might not get a job so i might be in debt all my life. >> the university is still seen a good -- as a good investment, because non graduates are fare even worse. but many students are having to lower their financial expectations. >> we still have it in our mind we will be better off than our parents. but i also think that there is an understanding that we may have to redefine what it means to be better off. >> at least he can take comfort in the fact he never has to study from these books again. bbc news, philadelphia. >> let's catch up on the aaron.ss news wit haar the european central bank is the place to be looking today. >> the big interest rate decision, will they or won't they? what everybody's waiting to see, the boss of the european central bank, one tsa at a press conference after they make the rate announcement. the euro zone back in recession in the third quarter. yet inflation is still high, above the bank's target. on top of that, the banks are in limbo because you have the next bailout installment from greece hanging in the balance. spain continuing to be reluctant to accept a full rescue package. and you still have the germans very opposed to the ec be bond buying program that they announced several weeks ago, or the banks would buy up the debt from the troubled european economies like spain. let's listen to what everybody is expecting from mario draghi today. >> many economists are hoping that the president of the ecp will say something more in his press conference about the forthcoming bond buying program. we know that spain is standing by to ask for a bailout. it is not yet asked for a bailout. but questions remain. how quickly could a bailout tappan expanded ask for a bailout? what conditions would have to be fulfilled if it wanted a bailout? above all, will the ec be bond buying program actually be legal? the german bank believes it's not legal. the ec says it is legal. for the moment there's a stalemate. we know that mario draghi is preparing to go to berlin next month to persuade the germans the bond buying program is legal. >> we will get that decision in 25 minutes. >> yes, 12:45. >> food prices, we should expect a hike? >> yes. world food prices are up once again. still hovering close to the levels that we saw back in 2008 when we saw last food crisis. you and i have talked about food prices this year a lot. the same old story, the severe drought in the united states, the worst in half a century. droughts in russia devastating the likes of corn, wheat, and soybeans. with the current food increase, mostly down to barry and meat -- dairy and meat products because you have higher grain prices. the grain is not just use for foodstuffs like you and i. it is speed for the animals. so that's really having an impact. -- it's feed for the animals. nobody says it's time to panic. but it's time for us in the west to say goodbye to the very cheap food for the many years we have had it. >> most people of my age and are nearly 40, they have been lucky enough to grow up in an era of relatively cheap and abundant food, particularly in the western world. however, the world has changed greatly. are seeing the emergence of a huge asian demand for food in my lifetime. people are demanding more food and better food. global demand for basic commodities like milk, wheat, and most meats has gone through the roof. >> looks like those higher prices will be sustained for awhile. >> thanks very much. let's lighten the load a little. october 1962, the beatles released their first single, " moment that some say changed music for ever and the end of an era. our correspondent has been in liverpool to see how it could inspire a generation. >> i loved it right away parrotwow, the harmonica. -- i loved it right away. with a harmonica. >> ♪ >> my friend had the record player so we listened to it. love me do ♪ >> in 1962, the beatles playes. >> i was the beatles' first major promoter. >> and 50 years later he was amazed to hear the beatles first single. >> they wrote their own stuff. so the song came as a shock. when i got at the record i gave it to my mother-in-law. she said [indiscernible] . >> he was no longer in charge. this man had taken over. it was a moment in pop history , but dealings were mixed in liverpool. part i remember feeling, how long will this last? we all knew this was a big thing. gone.nths later, it's ♪ ♪ >> for a 15-year-old singer it would never be the same again. after this came the madness. >> i'm from liverpool pant i used to sing 60 years ago -- and i used to sing 60 years ago. [indiscernible] it was beatlemania. >> tony barrow was asked to write a press release for the beatles. >> i said, yes. >> the sales, even though it made it to number one locally,. or disappointments >> what happened was people like the fans thinking if we've purchased this single, the beatles will be off to london and we don't want to do that, if we want to keep the beatles right here. >> its a great beginning of the beatles story in pop history, but something special here had come to an end. bbc news, liverpool. >> liverpool's loss was everyone else's gain. let me remind you of our top stories. there's been funeral's taking place in the turkish border town after two women and three children were killed by shelling from across the syrian border. turkey has renewed its response by firing at targets inside syria among the military targets in particular. the turkish parliament has been discussing authorizing troops to cross into syria. government forces say that turkey is not planning to declare war on syria. that's all for the moment. stay with us on bbc world news. much more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 4:00pm PDT
lost his grip on the judicial system. it's his crusade against the italian judicial system and it's possibly over. >> for much of his political career berlusconi has faced charges and court cases. he is currently accused of having paid for sex with an under-aged girl and in the role of a publication of an illegally obtained wiretap and today he was convicted of tax evasion in a case involving one of his tv companies. >> silvio berlusconi's last months in office were overshadowed by the fact that there were allegations that he had sex with an underaged girl called ruby. his so-called parties undermined his credibility. >> just two days ago the former prime minister said he would not be a candidate in next year's elections. almost a year ago crowds celebrated as he stood down as prime minister. he is expected to appeal a lengthy process in italy and it's most unlikely he'll actually go to prison. today's sentence will further undermine his political influence. gavin huth, bbc news. >> a cea
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 5:30pm EDT
and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 4:00pm PDT
what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is a bbc world news america. reporting from washington. from the valley to the middle of england, the girl shot by the taliban flies to the u.k. for treatment. are the weapons intended for rebels ending up in the hands of islamic extremists? and when he was convicted of murder, he lost his right to vote. 30 years later, he is on a mission to make his ballot count. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. the teenager shot in the head of arrived in britain for specialized medical treatment. she was targeted a week ago for her vocal campaign for a girl's right to get an education. since then, there has been an outpouring of international and pakistan the support. she is being treated at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. >> she leaves a military hospital after almost a week of emergency treatment. her destination, britain. this after then, she arrived at birmingham airport. the ambulance driving slowly through the streets to the queen elizabeth hospital. hear, a large number of doctors ought hand with years of experience treating british soldiers wounded in afghanistan. >> she will be assessed by range of specialists and a variety of other teams, which is clearly why she is coming here. >> she was well known for speaking out against the militant group. in particular, the campaign to stop girls going to school in her home region. she started writing a diary for the bbc three years ago when they controlled the valley. last week, the militants took their revenge, shooting her in the head. the attack has sparked angry demonstrations in pakistan. people here and around the world horrified that they are targeting such a young girl. >> there has been a wave of public revulsion in pakistan and around the world about the attempt to obstruct the education of young generation. united kingdom stands shoulder to shoulder with the people of pakistan fighting terrorism and trying to ensure that young people have a proper education and supporting the girl. >> they also emphasized earlier today that the pakistan government will pay for all of her treatment in the queen elizabeth hospital. that treatment could ask -- and last for many weeks. the girl that bears take a stand in pakistan is dependent on the skills of british doctors for her recovery. >> for more on international reaction to her story, i spoke a short time ago with the director of the south asia center of the atlantic council. i have been struck with the demonstrations we saw yesterday in throughout pakistan, by the degree of support that she has had within the country. >> is also remarkable that it is not just pakistan, even yesterday, there were demonstrations in afghanistan, people playing -- praying for her health and supporting the efforts of people supporting her in pakistan. >> were you surprised by that? would you anticipate that? >> not really. if you call this incident, following the demonstrations that took place, an opportunity for the radicals to take over the dialogue had to take to the streets, i was there the day that it began on the twenty first of last month. and this is really a slow and steady barrelhead for the soul of pakistan. in time for society to finally assert itself. this is not something the military can solve. this is something that society and politics will solved. >> did you see a significant, a significant moment in the rising up of the voice of moderation against extremism? >> yes, to some extent, but it is a very deep desire on behalf of most that ito that have talked for a sense of normalcy that has been absent for the last couple of decades. >> three or 4000 pakistan have been killed in by the taliban and drone strikes? >> it is about 35,000 out. no one is really safe. and they don't want the situation to continue. there is a disconnect between the use of pakistan that represent the majority of the population. this is a country with a median population of 21 years. and the politicians are calling the shots. >> to what extent does it really matter in terms of pakistan's relations if thousands of people turned out on the streets as we have seen the past couple of days? the military establishment and the intelligence establishment still decide. >> it will be a decision that the military needs to take. how do they openly and clearly sever all relationships with the groups that they once fostered? do they make it quite clear that this is not a path to pakistan's future relationships or its neighbors? once that decision is made clear, i think it can return to normalcy. >> a quick look at some other news from around the world. the european union has issued new sanctions against iran over their nuclear program. there are some of the toughest today. the foreign ministers also agreed to push for fresh talks on their nuclear ambitions. the nobel prize for economics has been awarded the two americans. it was in recognition of their research on finding ways to make good matches between economic agents. and designing markets. in the libyan capital of tripoli, they told the bbc that the fugitives have so far been recaptured. now to syria where the fighting continues. government forces have been trying to dislodge members of the free syrian army. recently, the bbc found evidence that weapons were being supplied by states such as saudi arabia. there is growing concern that many of those arms are going to islamic extremism. i spoke to david sanger. thank you for joining me. the allegations that concerns you have heard from the intelligence community is that arms being supplied by some of the gulf states are not going to the people they are intended to go to? >> that is right. the american hohhot here is that there would be a vetting process that would take place among all of these disparate rebel groups. and the more secular ones would be the ones supported by the arms. in fact, and this crazy arms bazaar going on along the turkish border, what is happening is that a hard-line islamic groups are ending up with the lion's share of the host of because there is no central clearing house where all these arms come into and somebody is making a decision about who gets them. >> there is no implication that they want them to end up with the extra tests? >> there are suspicions, but no indications. one of our correspondence was on the border and heard some of the fighters saying that they would grow beards and appeal to those that they thought might want to. the evidence is not terribly strong. they may simply be a better position to buy these on the black market. >> he talked about their not being a central clearing house. does that suggest that if there were some sort of leadership, whether it was the international community, washington, or turkey, it would be possible to stop the flow of arms? >> it might be possible to redirect it more, but it depends on having better intelligence on the ground about who these different rebel groups are. and if they are going to continue to look at where they are going. i think the concern now is that the extra tests are getting more light weapons, and it is going to make people think twice about providing heavier ones. >> governor romney has suggested he would arm some of the rebels. this might be a reminder of the complications of trying to do that. >> he said he would arm them with heavier anti-tank and anti- aircraft equipment. he said he would arm those that share our values. the difficulty is that he is working with the same intelligence community president obama has, and they're having a very difficult time figuring out who does share our values. >> a great report, thank you very much, david. >> the original fallout from the serious conflict is most acutely in turkey. not just the thousands of refugees, and within syria, they have won a degree of autonomy. they feel they will demand a similar freedoms. tensions are high. in the last 15 months, 700 people have been killed, and there are around 30 million in the middle east. our correspondent reports from the kurdish heartland of eastern turkey. >> the boys get ready for their fight. the older man can't resist checking their molotov cocktails. they want to show that they, too, can take on the turkish state. the population wants to rule itself. the presence on an island near istanbul. it will make it very difficult for the government and the army. >> among the mourners, gosh we always wanted peace. it might not be possible any more. he can't get along with the turkish people and we don't understand each other. >> he tries act as a bridge between kurds and turks. he is a member of a border town close to both iran and iraq. he represents and non-violent party. >> when the prime minister says that the problem is finished, he sends another hundred young people. every time he says there is no kurdish problem, he demonstrates the hope of the people and sends them to the front. >> here is where some of them end up. from a base in northern iraq, the acting leader has been told that the pkk is not ready to start fighting. >> lay down arms without any conditions? i don't agree with that. there must be a plan but answers all questions. turkey, as a democratic country, should solve the problem and then we will abandon our arms. dodge the turkish prime minister is unlikely to agree to that. he offers the kurds money, but not self-rule. to his supporters years, his government promises to defeat them. >> we are fighting against terrorist groups and actions from a very multi dimensional approach. the rest will be implemented in turkey. >> promises of development who don't come to the rebels down from the mountains. the turkish state may rule the kurdish region. soldiers and bullets where everyone can see them. >> the demand for autonomy ha, ha possible fallout from the syrian conflicts and the turkish government is watching very carefully. still to come on tonight's program, will the captain of the concordia face trial, a disaster that left 32 people dead. people wonder how safe is their neighborhood? one part of australia is opening access to an on-line register of convicted sex offenders. duncan kennedy has this report. >> named and shamed, where australians can go to find out if they have a convicted sex offender living near them. these are not actual offenders because it is a fence to publicize their faces. but if parents have over their name and driver's license as id, they can access the real site. >> it would have been confidential information and would not have been away. >> the scheme has been launched in western australia. visitors are given the names of any pedophiles' missing from their area along with photographs and distinguishing features. they won't be given exact addresses. >> i would like to put out there for parents, where there is no substitute for common sense and parental supervision. >> requests have to be approved by the police, but they will have to provide good reason to deny access. >>/tires and break windows, how these things will flow and they will have no effect remedy. >> is one of the few countries to allow public access. after the british girl went missing in 2007, there were calls for europe why'd public sex offenders register. the united states is one of the exceptions with many states allowing the public to log on. in australia, they share information on places like youtube for facebook. duncan kennedy, bbc nesws, sydney. >> for the first time, the captain of the cruise ship has appeared amidst an inquiry into the disaster. no words at the helm when the ship hit rocks earlier this year. he stands accused of manslaughter and abandoning his ship. >> the arrival of the man that was at the center of the disaster. he came to hear details of the case being compiled against him. they were shot out of the inquiry, but they knew that experts with evidence inside, they simply sailed to close, too fast. this has been the captain's public appearance. face-to-face with several of the survivors. several of them said he won't be able to look in the captain's eyes. there were demands for justice. >> we all must die. we got out with a minute or two to spare. the boat had already capsized and was going to crush us. we were scared and we want someone to be held responsible. >> some say that the capt. can't be blamed for all that happened. the captain's lawyers seem to suggest he is ready to face the consequences of what happened. >> there is no intention on behalf of the captain for blame on anyone. it is simply a case of getting him clear out in the best way possible. >> she still lives where she sank, and know about of courtroom arguments will ease the pain of those that lost friends and relatives aboard her on january. >> those extraordinary images, that chip is the laying off the coast of italy. today, the u.s. first lady car after absentee ballots and then to read about it to her husband. it comes ahead of the second presidential debate. among millions of american voters will be coming in before broadcasting his valid. after being unable to vote for three decades. as a convicted felon, he was automatically removed. he talks about his experience and how he is trying to help others. >> we want folks to be ready to go to the polls. if you should not be complaining about what the president is doing. >> i am more than excited to vote in this collection. if they had dogcatchers on the ballot, i would exercise my right to vote. i do work in virginia state prisons. this is my most valuable possession. in virginia, if you have been convicted of a felony, you lose the right to vote. 40 years ago commack as a young man, i was convicted of first- degree murder. it is not something that you do and forget about, it is with you each and every day. you have to live with it. and you have to do everything you can be -- to rebuild. i became the bible instructor, i have been released from prison, and i have been given simple pardons by the governor of the commonwealth of virginia. if you don't like your parole officer and obey the laws of the commonwealth, when it is time to have your rights restored, i will do it for free. keep on pushing forward. your day will come. >> i was arrested for drug dealing and conspiracy. i was released in 2009, and i stand before you today. i am just doing the right lane, making the right choices in life. >> will we have to make a petition to the government. we want to show that you have turned your life around and you are moving forward. everything you have done, for a church. >> everybody's votes count. even mine. we have committed some terrible acts, so it is reasonable that many individuals don't want to see the stroke. we want to prove that we come back to society. we can take that second chance and do great things. >> those that do time also lose their right to vote. he is regaining his right to a valid and helping others do that as well. remember, you can get updates on that story and all the top news of the day on our web site. join us tomorrow where we will have coverage of the second presidential debate. you can find a bbc team on twitter. thank you for watching. have a good night. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - get ready to blast off, neighbour. today we're going to play outer space at our friend miss elaina's house. and then we're going to play at prince wednesday's royal castle. i'm so happy you're my friend. ugga-mugga. be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood. ♪ - hi, neighbour. we're playing at miss elaina's house today. she lives in the museum-go-round, and she is a very fun friend. verrry fun.
WHUT
Oct 25, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hurricane sandy gathers momentum and targets cuba after hitting jamaica. nine-meter waves and a storm surge in southeastern cuba. hello. welcome to gmt with me, zeinab badawi. after the recent spike in violence, a truce between hamas and got and israeli forces -- in gaza. and we looked at the rise and fall of the arab world dictators. microsoft launches into the world of tablets. is it too late? it's midday in london, 7:00 in the evening in mei xiabeijing. in cuba, hurricane sandy has abandoned to the southeast of the country with a glimpse of 183 kilometers per hour. the category 2 hurricane has cut power, created 9 meter waves and a storm surge. thousands of residents and tourists have been moved from global areas as part of well rehearsed hurricane evacuation procedures. >> strong winds and heavy rain hitting havana. cuba experiencing the effects of hurricane sandy. while residents of the capital saw cover, it was in the southeastern part of the island that the parcel storm had made its landfall. maximum sustained winds of 180 kilometers per hour. >> the most dangerous for the moment is not the wind but the rain. this cwill be crossing over mountainous territory. >> with people riding out the storm the best they can, the storm is moving the northeast coast with heavy rain in its wake. >> " we are ok with the situation now. >> before its hit, it's a battered and jamaica with flash floods and deluge. many forced to take to emergency shelters. an elderly man is reported to be killed when a boulder crashed into his house. >> we still have concerns lingering for persons trapped. fishermen were told to evacuate before hand and refused to do so and are now trapped. they called for help, but it was too late. >> while jamaica begins cleaning up and counting the cost and with schools closed, now the bahamas are in the path of the storm and then possibly tropical storm conditions in florida. >> let's get the latest from the cuban capital with our correspondent will grant. give us an update. >> havana got off pretty lightly. most of the impact was in the eastern part of the country, as you said in your introduction. 1 million people in santiago de cubs, tens of thousands of people evacuated by emergency authorities. rain has caused flash floods and rivers have broken their banks. a pretty serious situation. it is still very early in the morning, so we are waiting for confirmation on exactly how much damage has been caused. authorities were very concerned last night as hurricane sandy was approaching from jamaica. >> will, this is a region accustomed to hurricanes. how prepared are the cuban authorities? >> all the countries in the caribbean are very used to this. this is the intense hurricane of the season so far. -- the 10th hurricane. they aren't mostly prepared. in the case of cuba, there's a tight state control of everything including information on such events as this. in this case they were particularly concerned about the more rural communities, the livestock in those places, too, so it would not have an economic impact. but the main thing was making sure loss of human life did not take place. we have not learned of any so far. information is still filtering out. we are just waiting to see how bad part of the island. it was a very powerful impact. over 180 kilometers per hour, the wind. >> thanks very much. now let's take a look at some other stories making headlines around the world. a committee of british politicians says the goal of building a viable government in afghanistan may have to be abandoned. international development committee said the u.k. should instead focus on in alleviating poverty and improving the lives of afghan women. in japan, the governor of tokyo is to launch a new national political party. he wants to work with other right-wing politicians to challenge the two dominant parties in elections that must be called before next summer. in saudi arabia, pilgrims have begun to arrive for prayer and reflection as part of the haj. many programs have made their way from mecca and medina and all the way to visited the place where the prophet muhammad delivers his final sermon. the israeli government and hamas have said an unofficial cease- fire has been reached in gaza and comes after a flare-up in violence on both sides. how comprehensive is this cease- fire? >> for the moment it largely seems to be holding. it was put in place at midnight local time, about 13 hours ago. we just heard from the israeli military that one mortar has been fired from gaza, landing in open space in israel, causing no injuries. what happens is there are a few breaches in the hours and days after a cease-fire. there's a lot of relief on both sides of the border. school had been cancelled. people in gaza are fasting ahead of a muslim festival. >> the cease-fire, hams said that -- hamas had said it was responsible for one of the attacks. other smaller groups as well? >> i suspect the mortar that was fired nearly this morning was probably from one of those smaller groups. some smaller groups consider hma -- hamas has compromised too much. i do believe hamas wants those groups to stop firing. there are political gains on both sides. hamas can reassert its credentials and israel wants to be seen as being tough on militants. israel has bigger issues to deal with in the region, notably iran. is focused on improving the economy. >> six months since medvedev left the kremlin to become prime minister. he has seen his power and influence significantly reduced. president putin has been reversing many of the liberal policies and reforms promoted under medvedev. all this has sparked a suggestion that medvedev is gradually quit disappearing -- is gradually disappearing from russia's political stage. >> the world of magic is strangely similar to the world of russian politics. behind the kremlin walls it is all smoke and mirrors. to succeed, you need a cool head, slight of hand, and you have to be good at making people disappear. vladimir putin is the consummate kremlin conjuror. he has erased the memory of medvedev's presidency. he has made many of his predecessors reforms disappear even without a magic wand. there are plenty of examples. medvedev had been decriminalized slander. putin has reversed that. medvedev ipad reset ties with america. under putin, sons of a thaw have vanished. medvedev's decision to keep russian clocks an hour ahead is now under review. it all makes medvedev look weak. >> putin would like things to be written in marble, just no one but him. >> dmitry medvedev has not disappeared completely. he is still the prime minister and leader of the ruling party. it is his record as president that is being erased and with its his reputation as a political player. today prime minister medvedev's decision not to run for president again left many liberals feeling betrayed. they had been counting on him to make russia more western, more democratic. was that realistic? >> you cannot degree democracy by waving a wand. now we shall have democracy, no. it just does not work that way. you have to change the way people think. >> if you will take part in spells and sorcery, there's always the risk things will never be quite the same again. bbc news, moscow. >> still to come, the latest weapon in microsoft's arsenal, the new surface against the ipad. there have been described as the forgotten victims of the nazi holocaust. the 500,000 members of the gypsy or roma community murder during the second world war are being remembered with a ceremony and a memorial in berlin. now more. >> the relatives of holocaust victims stood side by side with the german leaders as the memorial was inaugurated. , it is a ,a round pool in a glade among the autumnal trees in the main part in berlin. he was saved at the age of seven when his family were pushed on the train. a kind police officer simply pulled him and his aunt back. he says in that last moment my father screamed desperately, look after my boy. it was the last time i saw my loved ones, he says. it's estimated that about half a million roma were murdered in the holocaust. germany's chancellor said everyone of those people trusts her and the country. >> every single state in this genocide is a suffering beyond understanding and fills me with sorrow and shame. >> the people got of themselves as the forgotten victims. the process to create a memorial has been dogged by disagreements. but now it's there, a remembrance of the ones forgotten. bbc news, berlin. >> more on all our top stories, go to our web site to find a data analysis and coverage from our reporters around the world. i'm zeinab badawi and here are the headlines. in cuba there are winds of 183 kilometers per hour with hurricane sandy, after battering jamaica. a cease-fire between israel and hamas in gaza appears to be holding after taking effect at midnight local time. now aaron is joining me with good cheer for the u.k. economy. officially out. of out >> officially out of recession. the economy surged because we had growth of 1%, better than expected. a few key factors. we were coming off a low. the second quarter was quite low and that was during the queen's jubilee ceremony, which meant extra public holidays, costing the economy dearly. we knew that we would get a bit of a bounce in the third quarter. the olympic games was a major factor, adding a lot to the u.k. economy. olympic ticket sales contributed 0.2% towards the growth number, about 20%. the service sector makes up more than 70% of our economy. the restaurants, entertainment, hotels all got a boost. the problem is the euro zone. members yesterday suggested that region will go into a longer, deeper recession. that will affect us. >> the interesting thing about the figures is they are forward- looking, telling us what might happen in the fourth quarter. the figures from the uk today are for the third quarter, cooking backed through september -- looking back through september. we could go-again in the fourth quarter. -- go negative again. of germany goes into recession, all of europe may and it will not help the u.k. >> not good news for the big spanish bank santander. >> the biggest european bank has had a dismal past three months. its profits in the third quarter fell off a cliff, dropping by more than 90%. it's because of the property market in spain mostly. buying bad mortgages. reminding everybody that spain had a dramatic property boom, people were buying property in droves on relatively cheap mortgages and then came the crisis, the bubble bursting of the spanish property market. that left millions of people holding a mortgage of property where the mortgage was worth more than the property. that is a big problem. santander this year alone has set aside $4.5 billion to cover bad loans. since the bubble burst it has set aside $24 billion. the problems go even further for santander. it's not just spain. >> the results were set apart from the rest of the spanish banking sector because of its exposure to latin america. latin america and in particular brazil is starting to drag on sentence there. i think the concern is not only bad loans in spain, because there will be a lot more them given the bank of spain this week said the economy contracted by another 0.4% but also a brazil's growth forecast over the past two years has tanked. fairly murky. >> it is. the problem is being a global bank. >> thank you. off you go. in a few hours, the computer giant microsoft launches its latest operating system windows 8. it is an attempt by microsoft to catch up with rivals like apple, who have moved most faster into the world of mobile computing and touchscreens. now to seattle in the united states at microsoft headquarters. >> founder bill gates and his successor steve ballmer, and join the staff to celebrate 30 years of charitable giving. for steve ballmer, the next few days are crucial. >> we have three imagine -- have reimagined windows 8. >> the boss knows just what is at stake. >> the launch of windows 8 and windows phone is epic for microsoft. it's right up there with the launch of the ibm pc. it starts us on a new era of computing. >> more than 40,000 people across the seattle area aren't generating big profits from windows and office. over the last 10 years they have not produced anything that has changed the world or make consumers go wow, unlike apple to this week launched another ipad. microsoft believes the surface tablet computer, powered by windows 8, will show it can be even smarter. with the computer industry changing rapidly, this firm needs to move fast to stay in touch. bbc news, seattle. >> we will have a debate in a half-hour on the store when an apple addict and microsoft fan argue the pros and cons of each side. the syrian government is expected to announce it will accept a proposed a 04 pilar yes -- a four-day cease-fire during a religious holiday. the violence in syria is the bloodiest chapters so far in the arab spring which kicked off two years ago nearly indonesia. this week marks a year since the first elections in tunisia after the fall of bin ali,. in libya is a year since the death of colonel gaddafi, been in power more than 40 years. and the departure of the yemeni resident of dulles sal -- president salleh. there is a new book written about the rise and fall of rulers for life. roger, thanks for joining us. there's a copy of your book. i just want to ask you about bashar al-assad. do you think his time is up now? >> nobody knows exactly how it will go, but i suspect the regime will enable its own downfall by doing something stupid. >> by the nature of these authoritarian regimes, being very secretive about their power, it's difficult. to difficult >> you can not predict. you can imagine the pressure from that side, but you don't know whether there will be a palace coup, because you don't know who the advisers are. you cannot do that. ->> you. - people talk about arab exceptionalism. is there something peculiar about the arab strongman you don't see in other parts of the developing world that allows them to stay in power so long? >> i think it began with nasser. most places have a strong republican presidents. in the arab world they tried to reproduce themselves. i think that more of them begin to do that in the arab world. and they become very cl ubbish. >> they get tips from one another on how to stay in power. bashar al-assad has had one of the most successful regime this with his father handing over power to him, which moammar gaddafi it failed to do. syria appears to be the most successful and most durable. >> yes. the whole regime was devoted to making itself coup-proof and surrounded by loyal and trusted people. >> out of touch with the people. do you think the arab spring counts as a success? will. authoritarianism beni replaced? >> nobody knows. i think each chip looks quite good and egypt looks pretty good. if you have elections, religious parties tend to get in power. >> some feel more militant people will be getting in power. >> they will sound more harshly religious and will maybe turn out to be. >> and the free syrian army? >> they are nowhere right now. the coup against the egyptian army was so strong that it's not on the table at the moment. >> that's all from me at the moment. goodbye. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles.
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. iran's currency in free fall. president ahmadinejad accuses the west of an economic war. saving satellites of from space junk. the ambitious plan to clean up the upper atmosphere. what would you where to promote your favorite politician? we look at the memorabilia that helps promote presidential candidates. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and are around the globe. iran's currency is in freefall tonight. it has fallen 10% in trading against the dollar today, having already lost 80% of its value since the beginning of the year. president mahmoud ahmadinejad has accused the west of using sanctions to wage economic war against the country. u.s. officials say that this reflects the success of the economic sanctions targeted on the the nuclear program. >> a frightening crisis for the people of iran, a collapsing currency. with money losing value all the time, food prices have soared. some shops have stopped trading. many worry about jobs, savings, and why the government cannot stop it. >> the prices of food, cheese, butter, milk and even fruit have witnessed an increase of 10% in the last two weeks. people are complaining about that. they are publicly complaining about this situation and they blame the situation on a ahmadinejad. >> today, he put the blame on western sanctions. >> it is very clear, iran is being pressurized. there are sanctions from the enemy telling other nations not to buy iranian oil. this is a secret war. the enemy thinks that with these sanctions, they can defeat iran. they cannot. it is a psychological war. "you can see how much trouble the currency is in. in a week, it has lost 1/3 of their value. what is the cause? as we heard, president ahmadinejad's critics say that he is to blame for bad management. he seemed to agree with the west, that finally there sanctions are beginning to have a real impact. in the last year, the oil exports have roughly halved at as a result of sanctions. would it slide toward economic collapse and bring about the outcome that the west would like? >> hardship might make people more preoccupied with their ordinary life. this also strengthens the government in the sense that it would give it legitimacy to crush opposition and a civil society because of the threat. >> if the west is hoping that this tumbling currency might create the unrest, it might be disappointed. >> for more on the situation, i am joined by a member of a company which helps others do business in iran. thank you for joining me. >> thank you for having me. >> are we seeing the beginning of a complete economic collapse or can the government do something? >> i would not describe it as an economic collapse. i think the economy is too big and there are too many interests for it to collapse this easily. obviously, the economic situation is deteriorating. it is very clear that different factors have worked together, coincided at this stage, for this situation to be this critical. >> one of the things that the president has been discussing is economic sanctions. something he has denied which has any impact on the past. >> it is very convenient for him. in the past, basically, he wanted to make the argument that sanctions are not working. right now, while everyone else is blaming the government, and especially the president, for the current situation, he is blaming the sanctions. this is one way of diverting attention. >> who do the majority of the iranians claim? >> we don't have any accurate polls. it is very difficult to have a genuine opinion poll. my gut feeling says if they are very nuanced. they understand that the sanctions are having an effect. they understand that there are other domestic issues both the political and economic nature. >> what impact will this have on iran's regional power? could this curtail their up with 82 interfere in syria? >> -- and with their ability to interfere in syria? >> it depends. how would these impact iran. it is clear. i would describe this as a major hit up. this is a hiccup for the economy. different things have come together. just to give you one interesting statistic. and last seven years, the money supply has grown 600%. it is obvious that this is partly because of the subsidy reform, partly because of repatriation of the funds that have to keep money in the bank. we have had a pickup. throughout the past few decades. -- we have had hiccup periods through the past few decades. who will be the dominant force after this? if we have a situation where the more moderate forces gain the upper hand at the failure of the more hard-line forces, then there would be a rethinking in policy. >> that is a whole concept for another conversation. >> absolutely. >> the state of the economy in the u.s. is also in the spotlight. it is likely to be the focus of the first tv debate between the two candidates to monad. they are both well aware for the need to win the swing states. they are focusing on ohio where both candidates are speaking out to middle-class families. >> if at home with the shorts. a modern-day middle-class family, whose triumphs and struggles offer a snapshot of barack obama's america. the head of this family is one of the 12 million unemployed. >> i am a labor. for 15vi have been laid off months. we talk about barack obama and mitt romney. >> i would like to see both of them stepped in my boots for about six months. i don't think they understand what the individual goes through. they need to try living paycheck to paycheck. >> he has spent his whole life here. a community built on paper mills and steel. the downtown streets are lined with casualties of the economic crisis. for five across town, school has let out. the oldest is thinking about the university. they're looking for part-time work. >> it is not a single income economy any more. gas prices are through the roof. we have a family of seven. education systems worry me, health-care worries me. what will that do for my kids and grandkids? >> what barack obama and mitt romney have to address is a kind of middle-class malaise, a perception that while the rich will take care of themselves, and the poor will be taken care of by the state, people in the beenle have somehow b forgotten. this is what the middle class dream was supposed to look like. >> 1950's middletown. >> folbaum mike, well, i think he did a decent job but i don't like his health-care plan. -- obama, well, i think he did a different job. mitt romney is a decent job. him being as rich as he is, i don't think that he would understand a middle class person's problems. >> as a halloween decorations go up, the next generation is thinking as if trickle treat. >> clearly, the economic pain is still being felt here four years after the financial crisis. there are new moves to punish those responsible for the meltdown. the new york attorney general has launched a lawsuit against jpmorgan chase over accusations that the defrauded mortgage investor to the run-up to the global financial crisis. for more on that, i am joined by michelle in new york. why is jpmorgan being prosecuted when the alleged fraud took place at bear stearns? >> i think that jpmorgan might be regretting the day that the ever set their eyes on bear stearns. back in 2008 when bear stearns was in trouble, regulators were begging jpmorgan to come in and try to take over bear stearns. they did. this is a fairly short of a cheap price in terms of investment banking terms. nonetheless, it might be a deal that today regret because of the new york attorney general. they are able to get mortgages that they cannot necessarily of a fort at the time. the banks were slicing as of and repackaging them and selling them to investors. the problem is, according to this complaint, is that bear stearns claimed they were evaluating and monitoring the underlying mortgages. even after people started to default on these mortgages, we continue to slice them up, package them, and sell them to investors. investors lost more than $20 billion on assets on securities that sell for about $80 billion. >> thank you very much for that explanation. gunman have killed at least 25 people in an attack on a student hostel in northern nigeria. a 24 hour curfew is in place. a resident said that the attackers went from door to door shooting and stabbing their victims. the town has previously thing started by boko haram. french prosecutors have dropped the investigation into whether the head of the imf took part in a gang rape. they said they acted after a young woman retracted her allegations against the 63-year- old. pope benedict's former butler claims that he was mistreated after his arrest for allegedly stealing confidential documents. he said his cell was so small he could not extend his arms. he denies that charges but confessed to photocopying documents. when you look up into the sky, you might be dazzled by the stars. what you cannot see with the naked eye is -- see withcan secannot the naked eye is tens of thousands of satellites. they could crash into each other bringing down mobile phone networks. >> one of the strangest experiments is about to begin. a harpoon will be fired at part of a satellite. the aim is to find a way of cleaning up all of the junk in space. this is the swarm of junk that the harpoon is meant to tackle. the red dots represent old rockets and satellites. they are in the same area of space as the working satellites that we depend on. collisions have already happened. the idea is to fire the harpoon to capture the satellite. this way, the junk can be steered down into the atmosphere to be burned up. space has become a critical part. we see this every day. we see this in telecommunications, gps, and the space junk that is out there poses a real threat to these satellites which are provided as data. >> the first that is to test what the harpoon does to the fragile skin of a satellite. too powerful a shot could blow it apart and create even more junk. what they are aiming at is an aluminum structure that most satellites are may vowed -- are made of. the harpoon has made it through. cartooning could be part of the answer. it is one of several techniques being investigated which is evidence of the growing awareness of the threat of space junk. >> last weekend, the skies above britain were street with what might have been space junk burning up. there should be more of this. the cost of carpeting is not known but the legacy of the space agency is proving dangerous. cleaning it up the starting to look worse. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come. a push to ban the centuries-old sport. australia's great barrier reef is the largest in the world but it is under severe threat. a new study has revealed that more than half of it has disappeared in the last 27 years. the causes are natural and man- made. scientists say the next decade will be critical to stopping the decline. largest the world's coral reef system, and unrivaled marine tool had been two and a half thousand kilometers of the northeastern shoulder. the scientists say that more than half of it has been destroyed in the past 27 years. cyclones account for nearly 50% of the destruction. 40% has been damaged by crown of thorns starfish. 10% has been done by coral bleaching which has been caused by rising water temperatures and increase the city. the result, a global climate change. >> as nothing else changes, the outlook looks pretty bad. the paper we just had published suggests that it was the same conditions over the next 10 years, we would see further reduction by half. remember, these changes are happening before the major impact of climate change kicks in. >> the government says they are spending hundreds of millions of dollars trying to protect the great barrier reef. the u.n. says that unless more is done, the reef risks losing its world heritage list davis. this would turn into a political and ecological disaster. it has just been stand by google. are these pictures about to go from being an up-to-date window on the "masterpiece to a collection for an archive? >> a thrilling sport tradition or a crow and antiquated form of entertainment? in mexico, the debate is raging on whether to ban bullfighting. >> it is still one of the most controversial past times in the americas. bullfighting has been practiced in mexico since the time of the conquistadores, but its days might now be numbered. last year, a proposed ban in the mexican capital only felt at the final hurdle. this time around, the activists are convinced that the legislation will pass. following a partial ban in countries like peru and ecuador, this, the largest bullring in the world in mexico as potential the next site to be closed down. that is something that these fans and the workers here are desperate to avoid. this has been in the hernandez family for five generations. as they run their eye over a possible praetors, they look for speed, strength, and the instinct to charge. the men are very aware that their livelihood is at stake. >> we take care of these animals, is better than we take care of ourselves. there are economic and cultural questions at stake. bullfighting has existed in mexico for more than 500 years. it strikes me as irrational that as a single stroke of a pen, a legislator, under pressure, can take away what is ours. >> he says a million people in mexico depend on bullfights to make a living. such claims are disputed by the pro-band campaigners in mexico city and will not convince them that the bullfighting should be scared. >> in mexico city, it is very similar to what happened in catalonia. the bullring's are empty. the plaza is empty. they survived on the whim of powerful economic sectors to still think they can do is they wish. >> we look at some of the memorabilia that they have collected over a lifetime dedicated to the spectacle. he fears memories might soon be all he has left. if the ban is passed, the whole industry faces a very uncertain future. >> with every presidential election campaign here in the u.s. comes on entire business dedicated to promoting the candidate. anything, basically from badges, ribbons, posters, to the millions spent on television advertisements. now, from a mountain has gone under display online. it seems like those buttons have a long tradition. >> we are looking at 1952. this is an archive of presidential campaign memorabilia from 1952 until the present. >> vote for president johnson. >> we have about 400 commercials. we started off by going to the different presidential libraries and correcting videos and converting this to the digital files. you can jump to any election year. you can click on 1980. that will take you right to a page for ronald reagan vs. jimmy carter. the commercials are 30 seconds or a minute that they summarize what was going on in the campaign to tell us what the main issues are. they were not intended to last as a historical record or if you look at years and years later. these are really important historical archives. >> these were made for the obama campaign. >> a democratic cookie cutter. >> what you see behind us is just a sampling of some of the material that we collected from the last two conventions. >> it is on a table in a room that is our reference collection. full complete collection of the record for american politics and it goes back to george washington. >> this whole row of materials is made up of campaign buttons. this is from the mckinley campaign from 1896 until 1900. >> every four years ago out on the campaign trail and rebuild it out with contemporary material. >> some of these were passed by a local delegation. you go to the local primaries and we go to the national convention. it is the buttons, the posters, the signs, the funny hats people wear. what we are trying to do is to collect the entire of sent through these material options. bring this back to washington, there is a cataloging process which will ultimately lead to a digitized record. >> we exist to document culture and this is part of that. it is that materiality that we are trying to gather. it has to have dimension to it. >> i feel that is important to understand history in order to understand the president. history does have a way of repeating itself and in america, it repeats itself every four years. if you have an understanding of tricks, techniques that have been used, you can understand what is going on now. >> that brings today's show to a close. for all of us here at world news america, thank you for watching and come back tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
WHUT
Oct 12, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> for bringing peace to a continent ravaged by war, the nobel peace prize is awarded to the european union. >> with riots on the street over the economics, what to make of the timeling. -- what to make of the timing. >> hello and welcome to gmt. i'm david eades. also coming up on the program, battle of the beat, young versus old. but who emerged the winner of the vice presidential debate in the -- in kentucky. and with midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington. 1:00 p.m. in oslo where the nobel peace prize has gone not to an individual or even a handful of individuals. it's been awarded to a political entity and one which currently divides opinions like never be. the european union. the nobel peace prize is a controversial choice given the tensions over the economics and the austerity measures the u.n. imposed on some countries in the euro zone. >> the door of the nobel opened at exactly 11:00 local time, as happens every year where the committee chairman makes his announcement. once again, it was a huge surprise. >> the nobel committee has decided that the nobel peace prize for 2012 is to be awarded to the european union. >> the european union emerged from the seventh station of the second world war in which tens of millions of people were killed. the aim was to prevent further conflict in europe. focusing initiatives on france and germany. >> today war between germany and france is unthinkable. this shows a well maintained effort and confidence that former foes can become close partners. >> what's now known as the european union expanded rapidly. the fall of the berlin wall led to eastern europe's country joining. and it was something the european commission president also focused on today when he gave his reaction to the award. >> european union was able in six countries to reunite almost all european continents. freedom, democracy. rule of law and respect for human rights are the ones that people all over the world aspire to. >> but the e.u. has won the peace prize in the midst of an acute financial crisis which has led to violent demonstrations in greece and spain. in europe, all divisions are reopening. perhaps that's why the european -- the nobel committee wants to boost it, prevent it from fragmenting. >> well, it's turned up a lot of discussion. we'll be going to the self-appointed capital of the e.u., brussels in a moment. first of all, we're going to catch you up on other stories making headlines around the world. idea's winner of the nobel prize for literature says he hoping the compatriot who won two years ago would soon be freed as he was jailed in 2009 and serving an 11-year sentence for inciting subversion of to the power. >> and the president's mohammed to remove the country's top prosecutor. as a farce, the president's move follows an angry public response to the acquittal of a group of supporters of the outgoing regime. reducing the risk of extinction for threatened species and establishing protected areas cost the world more than 76 billion dollars every year. researchers say this is needed for a conservation target. but they say the daunting numbers is just a bit of what the world spends on soft drinks every year. now arguments over the economy, social policy and presence on the world stage. there's not only talking points in europe. joe biden and his republican rival paul ryan held their one and only debate from kentucky last night. >> we welcome vice president joe biden and congressman paul ryan. >> the grizzled warrior and the young pretender, squaring up for a contest that would prove as entertaining as it was brutal. they began on libya and the attack on a consulate. >> it took the president two weeks to acknowledge that this was a terrorist attack. what we are watching on the tv screen is the unraveling of the obama foreign policy. >> with all due respect, what you just said is malarkey. >> he didn't make amends for his boss' -- on iran, he accused the republicans of loose talk. >> it was on the ascenden as i when we took office. it is now totally isolated. >> and he went where barack obama would not by referring to the secretly-filmed video where romney referred to the middle class as -- >> with respect to that quote, i think the vice president very well knows that sometimes the words don't come out of your knockout right way. >> he took that on the chin but little else from afghanistan to syria, medicare to taxes, neither man was giving ground. >> and still preserve the middle class -- >> not mathematically possible. >> it is. it's been done before. >> it has never been done before. >> it has been done a couple times before. >> now you're jack kennedy? >> but there was an under current of mutual respect and when it ended the two families joined them on stage. in the polls they were wondering if this man did enough to restore team obama's confidence. >> 10 years ago indonesia underwent the boly bombings many torturists from pretty much all over the world. survivors have been back to bomby to commemorate the anniversary. security was tight after they were warned of attacks. >> 10 years on. and the emotions are still raw. for some, the memorys are too much to bear. looking at the photos of those who died, australian and indonesiain' leaders stayed extremists tried to sew hatred between them, but failed. >> terrorists have killed and maimed thousands around the world but they will never sundayer or displace a single ideal. we will never forget all that we lost. we will hold fast to that which remains. to our determine nation as a free people to explore the world and unheld by fear. to defeat terrorism. >> this was a tragedy that affected not just australians but more than 20 nationalities. the second number of lives lost came from indonesia. it dealt a blow to boly's tourist industry. today bali's streets are bustling again. >> 10 years later, and this is bali's ground zero. a memorial to honor the dead. standing in between the spots where the two nightclubs once stood. many ways, bali has moved on. but for those who were affected, they will never forget what happened that night. >> those responsible for the blasts have been brought to justice. the remorseless bali bombers have been executed and their extremist network has also been severely weakened. but officials warn indonesia eswar on terror is far from over. >> even though the big fish of these networks have been caught, the next generation of militants have now formed smaller cells that can now execute plans iptly but still have the same radical views and goals as the first. >> bali is now thronging with more tourists than ever before. but the threat of terrorism still remains. 34 here hope they can finally close a chapter on bali's deadly day. >> the e.u. claiming this year's recipient of the nobel peace prize. joining me from brussels is your correspondent, chris morris. i wonder what sort of initial response you picked up from brussels. delight i suppose is eminent, but some surprise? >> yes. i think as you would expect, a mixed reaction is probably the best way to put it. those who run the e.u. institution are delighted. an award for all 500 million citizens in the european union. i think probably more than 499 million of those and counting would just shrug their shoulders and carry on with life as normal. but i think there's a symbolic aspect in all this. at a time when the e.u. is under so much pressure, it appears the nobel committee is saying don't forget the good and don't throw the baby out with the bath water. euro skeptics are already screaming saying it's ridiculous and a disgrace and would have been psych path i can years ago and now it's just plainly out of touch. certainly not an award for the peace and harmony on the streets of athens and madrid. i think it's easy to criticize and laugh in a way but it is a little bit of a reminder than the e.u. has achieved things, and big things in the post war -- post second world war period that's been created even though it's now in quite a bit of a difficult situation. >> i guess as each year goes by, trying to sell that story of the european union having peace and stability after two world wars gets tougher. not many politicians around lived through that phase. crisis is now the word we associate with the e.u. and trouble on the streets are the pictures we get. >> that's right. the second world war generation is certainly saying never again should this happen in europe. dreadful and terrible scenes from two disastrous world wars in the 20th century which really do put into context the pictures we can use now of the 200 people using stones and model to have cocktails. we're talking it's not even comparable, clearly. on the other hand, you know, there are new europeans that think of them as new europeans, the countries that joined the e.u. and the countries that were under communism for a long time. and nato. those two big institutions, something which has given them the freedom they wanted. >> chris morris, thank you.stil team witnessed dire conditions in a hospital in aleppo where doctors are doing their best to treat large numbers of people. among them, children. >> the u.k.'s first atomic bomb store, a roller coaster or 100-year-old cinema. among 1,000 sites risking destruction due to aging. we report. >> in an earlier age of austerity, the roller coaster at the dream land offered an escape from the misery of the great depression. britain's oldest roller coaster is in decay and many others are at risk of being lost forever. another is the crescent in buckston darby sure. it has fallen out of use by the turn of this century though now repairs are under way. >> you see they are begin is to go fall into disrepair and then you see it demolished. u kind of lost part of your house, haven't you? >> english heritage wants people to get involved where they can. the historic grand union canal is steadily undergoing refurbishments. >> these are being replaced. it will cost 90,000 pounds, and that is problem for english heritage, convincing people that preserving the past is worth doing when the present is defined by shortages and budget cuts. >> and heaving these to future generations can be a difficult decision to make. >> you can find out much more about this battle to save english heritage by heading to our website. increasing efforts to ball nies the efforts. we're taking a closer look at some of the buildings identified as being -- as needing repairs. >> this is gmt from "bbc world news" i'm david eades. these are the headlines. nobel peace prize goes to the european union for its roll in democracy and human rights in europe. foreign policy in the state of the economy dominate the only debates between the two candidates. >> to business news, jamie is here. we're talking about the e.u. some of the darker side you're focusing on. >> yes. i was going to say, it's been the focal point, the epicenter of the crisis. maybe it didn't start there but actually where it is center is mostly europe. what i am seeing now is the european union representing, like germany and the i.m.f. features the bbc debate on friday. they said perhaps more time is needed for states trying to cure the debt problem and on the other hand saying no, we've got to stick to the timetable and people have got to hit the timetables. this is what careen lagarde said in a debate hosted by the bbc. >> adjustment is needed. but it's not going to be the same for all. it's going to be country-specific and also in regards to the rest of the package put in place. but there's no doubt in our mind that the burden of debt currently waiting on the shoulders of advanced economies is not sustainable in the long run. but it's a marathon. >> i think that sums it up. it's a marathon, not a sprint. of course everybody wants them toe merge victorious. but -- >> and tell me a bit more about the london wales. back in the spotlight. both figures have come up with j.p. morgan, american investment bank. 35%. however, behind these figures we've got problems in terms of a massive trading loss, which has emerged this year. committed by this character who is called the london wail. he did these extraordinaire trades of enormous size and then suddenly they -- suddenly he did well. and now a number of banks are being accused of illegal workings. >> when the news broke, i think the first or second quarter of this year, it was $2 billion, initially the losses the trade london wales racked up. now they are saying $6 billion. worst-case scenario, another $1.8 billion so we will get clarity on where they are with these trades. >> interesting. we will get a little more clarity on the. but share prices are back up to where it was before. there are still eruptions in the banks. >> riding the storm. >> yes. >> thank you very much, indeed. >> now near brit at any royal military police have arrested some related to murder in afghanistan in 2011. it's to be the first time military personnel in u. cument are to have been arrested due to killing in the -- in afghanistan. >> these arrests were made because of incidents last year when they carried out 41,000 patrols. 23 service men from the brigade lost their lives on that summer tour of duty. one stays incident in question followed an engagement with an insurgent and that there were no civilians involved. strictly troops should never open fire unless they are niged with the enemy and could be prosecuted if they get it wrong. some say it is to ensure the u.k. personnel acted in corns with the rules. now there will be a an internal review the rectify lessons learned. >> staying here in britain for the moment because the police watchdog here says it will undertake the biggest investigation into police actions over the hillsborough stadium disaster in 1989 in the yorkshire city of sheffield in which 90 football fans died. a large number of serving or retired officers were being investigated over what happened on that day and the alleged coverup that followed, this coming on the back of the publication of findings that lead directly to the disaster. egypt is stepping up efforts to bring back the tourists after many were scared off by the violence in the areas. our correspondent has the. >> these are hard times for the camels and their owners who make a living off the tourists who visit egypt's most popular monuments. the souvenir stands with their rows of pharaohs, plates and pyramids are all looking sadly empty. though one shop owner is putting on a combrave face. >> must be hard for you and your family and all the people working here. >> yes. because we are working with torturists. >> the problem is many westerners still see egypt as something of a war zone. this man is an american tourist in egypt. >> they said if you go there, you're going to get kidnapped and al qaeda is going to kill you. not true. what i found here so far is people are very nice. they welcome torturists and i haven't had any problems. >> so now ministers have stepped up efforts to reassure the world. after a long restoration project -- >> look around you. lots of people are coming. so the message was sent and received by all the people. egyptians and all the countries. to look around you. obscure, ready to receive anybody who might come here to visit our monments. >> this is the root torturists can now take once again into the very heart of one of the great pyramidses. that is if they don't mind bending double through these ancient passages. >> i'm just coming out now into the burrell chamber right in the heart of the pyramid. >> we opened after a year of restoration. this is where the pharaoh himself was buried. as far as i can see, the only real danger here is claustrophobia. >> back in the warmth of the egyptian sun, it all seems al picture of calm after the turbulence of the revolution. the torturists are once again lining up to take the photo of the pyramid in the palm of the hand. >> now just want to bring you right up to date on the situation with regard to the hillsborough story we were telling you. the fans that lost their life were all from liverpool, because they were playing an epic semi cup and we had a clear and warm welcome coming from the town of liverpool whose expressed satisfaction on behalf of the families' victims that this decision is being taken to start investigations into a significant number of police officers both serving and retired as to their role that fateful day. now, fuve paying attention, wouldn't want you dropping off, but we all do from time to time perhaps at the end of a busy day you can get too tired to eat. all you want to do is go to sleep. a.j. and m.j. they are only 28 months old and doing their darnedest to finish their spaghetti. their mother put this online after what was a long day we're told spent building sand castles and playing in the pool. it goes on and on, this but ultimately you get this. they never quite finish the spaghetti. ok. i just want to remind you of our top story here on gmt. this is nobel peace prize awarded to the european union. the e.u. was given its reward for its long-term role of united eastern europe. after world war two. that's it for now from gmt. stay with us here on "bbc world news." >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los presented by kcet, los angeles
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington, i'm katty kay. what went wrong in benghazi -- lack of intelligence or lack of security? congress has questions. inside the stronghold of the bashar al-assad, the bbc gains rare access to one legion of syria still trying to ignore the conflict -- one region of syria still trying to ignore the conflict. in las vegas, the housing crisis has left people wishing they had not taken the gamble. >> i was left over extended. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it has now been four weeks since the attack on the libyan consulate in benghazi, which left the u.s. ambassador and three others dead. today, american rule makers were demanding answers about whether the levels of security were enough. testifying before a congressional committee, state department official said the correct number of agents were in place. during this election season, this issue has become controversial. our north america editor reports. in the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues -- >> the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues died in the attack. they had repeatedly asked for tighter security. initially, the american government the attack to protest against an anti-muslim film. now they say it was a terrorist attack. >> the committee will come to order. >> republicans are outraged at the change. >> in fact, it was 9/11, the 11th anniversary of the greatest terrorist attack in u.s. history, in new york, pennsylvania, and at the pentagon. it was that the anniversary which caused an organization allied with al qaeda to attack and kill our personnel. >> this is not just about why the attack took place. people at the state it -- the charges that people ignored the request for further security. only months before the election, that is a very serious charge. imitt romney has put the attack at the heart of his argument that president obama does not stand for america. -- stand up for america. >> as the administration has finally conceded, these attacks were the deliver it work of terrorists. >> the committee -- for the deliberate -- these attacks were the deliberate work of terrorists. >> we have hundreds of terrorist-type activities. our consulate is bombed twice. the british ambassador has an assassination attempt. you are arguing about whether the number was five or two or five or three. >> democrats say the cuts backed by republicans are the problem. some say the whole situation is out of control. >> we all know the game. we want to stop the attacks on our embassies? let's stop trying to overthrow governments. >> one person said that another six agents would not have made a difference. this is about the state department looking complacent. >> for more on the hearings and what happened in benghazi, i am joined by p.j. crowley. thank you for coming in. whatever your former employers say, there was a security problem in benghazi, wasn't there? >> absolutely. you see clearly that the security situation was underestimated. while there might not have been in the intelligence, you have a number of armed factions who are capable of doing what one group eventually did. we understand that, notwithstanding questions about numbers and capabilities, the military team that was there -- it is not clear that any number of security personnel inside the perimeter of the consulate could have repelled the attack. we did get hints today that potentially more personnel might have been able to evacuate those injured, perhaps save the life of the ambassador. >> there are views that this attack was unprecedented. that is the very nature of the attack, that it can be unprecedented. it is very hard to gauge what kind of security is needed. >> undersecretary pat kennedy, the lead witness today, made a compelling point that, as soon as the united states made a decision to resume normalized relations with the new government after participating in the overthrow of gaddafi, once we made that fundamental decision, it put our personnel at risk. where you can eventually -- this was a diplomatic mission. they had not had time yet to work on a normal construction project and build a permanent facility. the state department was excepting the level of risk. while the jobless risk mitigation, you could never bring the risk down to zero. as soon as the united states was establishing a diplomatic presence in the benghazi, they understood there was always going to be risk involved. >> the sad irony of this is that american diplomats, since 9/11, the attacks, they have often been criticized for being too removed, set up behind brick walls, not able to communicate with people. >> that is always the balance. if you withdraw inside fortresses, you cannot do the job you want to do. you cannot influence and promote libyan society in the way that you want to. that is the conundrum. that is the balance that obviously we are critiquing in after -- after the event. trying to figure out what lessons to learn and how to move forward in the future. >> if you listened to those hearings, you heard how intensely political they were. four weeks before the election, is this the right time? >> today was a political event. they are important questions. there are still better questions. we still do not know the bottom line of why this group was motivated act as it did. was it planned well in advance? was it somewhat spontaneous? what kind of changes should we make in the future? >> thank you mary much for coming in. now to turkey, where jets forced assyrian passenger plane to land in ankara today -- forced a syrian passenger plane to land in ankara today. the plan was eventually released. turkish -- the air plan was eventually released, allowed to resume its slide -- the airplane was eventually released, allowed to resume its flight. more than 32,000 people have been killed in the uprising across the country. yet one region in western syria, along the mediterranean coast, remains largely untouched by the violence. it is the ancestral home of president assad and his mi niority. -- minority. >> another day dawns along the mediterranean. there is an ease in this area that you do not find in many parts of syria anymore. the only fighting in this part of the country is among friends. i met a popular group of students at a cafe. they come from many groups, but the coexist here -- but they coexist here. it is hard to believe that war is raging just a few hours from here. >> is it too dangerous to come to syria? >> you can see people shopping and playing. nothing. >> nothing happens. no problems here. maybe like -- they say there is a problem in damascus, for example. it is not all of damascus. it is one little area. not a whole city. >> but this place isn't shut off from the rest of the country. when serious uprising began some -- when syria's uprising began some 18 months ago, there are also uprisings in the square here, but they were forcefully put down. aside from occasional demonstrations or explosions since then, this remains one of the most peaceful areas in the whole country. authorities are determined to keep it that way because this region is too important to lose. it is the ancestral home of the assad's. they are a large minority in this city and they dominate the hills behind. by charlotte saw's father is buried in these hills. we were -- bashar al-assad's father is buried in these hills. we were given rare access. he died in 2000, as syria's all- powerful president. it is often his -- it is often said his son is under pressure to preserve his legacy. this town was quiet when we visited. since then, there have been reported clashes between leading families. a measure of growing unease over their place in syria's troubled future. this region is still regarded as the president boss last lastbt -- president's redoubt. but war has reached part of this area. amateur video claims to show destruction in the community toward the turkish border. rebels now control some villages. the war is often described as a sectarian conflict. this man wants his identity hidden. he has long been in opposition. does he see it as a sectarian war? >> of course it is not. this is the work of the regime. from the very beginning, it has been trying to create this year to make them a line with the regime -- this fear to make them align with the regime. >> it is a secular mosaic. other parts of syria thought they were special, too. >> amazing beaches, jet skis, not something you associate with the de's syria. an egyptian court has -- with today's syria. an egyptian court has acquitted those charged with the attack. the charge left a number of protesters dead. the court found all of the defendants not guilty, including two former ministers. the u.s. anti-doping agency says its investigation into cyclist's lance armstrong has uncovered the most sophisticated professional and successful doping program the sport has ever seen. 11 of his warmer teammates testified against him in their statements -- 11 of his former teammates testified against him in their statements. mr.'s nor -- nobel prize for chemistry has been won by two americans -- and this year's nobel prize for chemistry has been won by two americans, robert lefkowitz and brian kobilka. it is hoped that their work could ultimately produce medicines that have fewer side effects. now to twist in the case of the punk group. one member of pussy riot walked free today, but two of her colleagues are heading to a penal colony. they performed a song in the cathedral, mocking vladimir putin. >> she was free, but she didn't get far. yekaterina samutsevich was mobbed by supporters and journalists. but she was soon in the arms of her father. , but i feel bad for the others who did not get out. >> in court, some would say that the two-year -- in court, her setnece -- her sentence was commuted. the other two will be sent to a prison colony. she says, open will we have been jailed for our political beliefs -- she says, "we have been jailed for our political beliefs. ieven if we are sent to siberia, we will not stay silent." then again, they never have. it is this stunned which put three of them behind bars. they besieged the virgin mary to rid russia of vladimir putin. in court today, the defense lawyer argued that her client should be treated more leniently because she had not been given the chance to perform these controversial punk prayers at the christ the cathedral. even before her guitar was taken out of the case, she was taken out of the building. protests were held outside of the courthouse. the female punk group is out of tune with the public opinion. believe that the sentences lenient -- tehe sentence is lenient. yekaterina samutsevich has apologized, but she does not believe she has committed a crime. >> more still to come. could solar storms knocked your navigation way off course -- storms knock your navigation way off course? the teenage active is shot by the taliban in northern pakistan has been visited -- the teenage activist shot by the taliban in northern pakistan has been visited by a general. she became famous after she criticized the taliban for targeting schools like hers. the taliban has warned that even if malala yousafzai survived the attack she will still be a target -- survived the attack, she will still be a target -- survives the attack, she will still be a target. >> they are in shock. her classmates pray for their friend. she says malala is like our sister. we pray for her earliest recovery and well-being and that others didn't benefit from her in lightning -- and that others benefit from her enlightening views. the injured girl is in the hospital, still unconscious and in critical condition after surgeons removed a bullet from near her spinal cord. >> malala yousafzai. [applause] >> this is malala just a few months ago, receiving an award for her campaigning in favor of girls' education, but her success made her a target for the taliban. the cold-blooded shooting of such an innocent victim has united most of pakistan and its immediate in a wave of revulsion. this shopkeeper says that it is the proof of brutality. this is not an attack on malala, but all the daughters of this nation. the taliban has justified the attack, saying malala was pro- western. some tribal leaders said this was against their -- against islamic practice. >> there are less than four weeks to go until american voters cast their ballots. the presidential candidates are fighting for votes. nevada has the highest rates. residents want help. the candidates are promising to do more, but can they fix america's housing crisis? last week, i went to las vegas, where life is in short supply -- where luck is in short supply. know where have they partied harder -- nowhere have they partied harder. they didn't just gamble with chips. they risked the future, too. >> i was one of the ones to over-extended and spend beyond their means -- ones who over- extended and spent beyond their means. >> she walked away from her house, left it to the bank, and lost her life savings. >> it was my dream home. it was around a golf course. a gorgeous view. green, lush. a beautiful community. >> at 9 out of 10 houses on the market in las vegas today are in a similar position, where the owner bought a home for more more -- a home for far more than it is worth today. it is a story of boom and bust. the most pressing issue facing -- facing the next president is how to fix the housing crisis. until that is done, the economy will not recover. >> ♪ i was born free ♪ >> campaigning in the area, mitt romney has promised help. >> we have to reignite the home values so they start going up again. >> president obama insists he has already helped. >> we have helped homeowners refinance their mortgages. >> bottoming out is what has already happened to the houses next to this pig farm. at the height of the boom, the hogs made acceptable neighbors. after the crash, not so. homeowners here know the value is not coming back. >> let them buy a new home. >> only in las vegas would have foreclosure lawyer the famous. there is a counter intuitive solution -- more credit is needed and now. >> home owners cannot go out and buy with cash. they need financing. investors that are buying houses right now are foreign. >> you have people from other countries buying these houses from outside the country. >> right. >> who is coming? >> a lot of asian countries, a lot of canadian money, a lot of australian. >> the same crash that has made bargains for foreign investors has swelled the lines of nevada's welfare offices. unemployment is up. these people do not think politicians can help. >> they blame the bank. they do not think obama has done much to punish the bank. they do not see running as a guide will help them with the bank -- see romney as someone who will help them with the bank. >> business has returned to but it -- vegas' strip, is a fantasy land, the golden shimmer of fragile facades for an economy still floundering. speaking of areas down on their luck, tonight, standard and poor's have cut spain's credit rating to triple-b minus, just above junk status. the agency cited a deepening recession which limits the government's options to stop the slide for the reason -- as the reason for the downgrade. satellite navigation has changed the way we live. old-fashioned map has been replaced by digital guides -- the old-fashioned map has been replaced by digital guides. our edit your reports on the latest research -- our e ditor reports on the latest research. >> it is when the loneliest stations in the world. -- it is one of loneliest stations in the world. a giant flare erupts from the surface. it is a solar storm, a mesmerizing site, but scientists say this could disrupt -- a mesmerizing sight, but scientists say this could disrupt the signals from satellites. this scientist has to carry a gun because there is a real threat from polar bears. they are researching whether solar flares could affect satellite navigation. >> what we need to research is how these gps systems are affected by solar storms and by these huge amounts of energy coming into the earth. >> when that solar energy strikes, you get the northern lights, the famous swirl of particles in the upper atmosphere. this can disturb the gps system on a serious scale. scientists are finding out the true extent of that effect. they have measured how severe conditions can lead to a huge loss and the accuracy -- a huge loss in accuracy. how much disruption could you get? >> if you have a very large solar storm, you can get up to 10s of meters -- 10's of meters. >> 10's of meters between where you are and where you think you are. for most of us, it might not matter that much. for some, pinpoint navigation could be a matter of life and death. the more we have come to rely on satnav, in fact, anything involving satellite technology, the more critically important research like this has become. ideally, they will work out a way of forecasting the most damaging effects. there is still a lot of mystery about the sun, how it disturbs the atmosphere, and what that means for us, but this is where we will start to get some answers. >> ok. i always knew that maps were the best thing. that brings our program to a close. if you like to find me, fine dust on t -- find us on twitter. from all of us, thanks for watching. i'll see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - hi, neighbor! i'm going to share something special at school today. i can't wait to show you what it is! and then, we're having dinner... at a restaurant! and you're coming, too! i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine, could you be mine ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! i'm so excited! today is my turn to take something to school for show and tell! that means i get to bring something in to school and show my friends.
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Oct 19, 2012 6:00pm EDT
news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. ! steele: thanks, lucy. darling, here's a list of places you can reach me.
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Oct 22, 2012 7:00am EDT
to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles.
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Oct 23, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> ♪ >> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> the bbc sex scandal threatening the bbc's leadership at the present. the head of the corporation facing questions during 40 years of media stardom of jimmy savile. >> the culture at the bbc seemed to have allowed this behavior. >> welcome to gmt. david eades. also, the final phase of the presidential tv showdown as obama and romney debate foreign policy. who is the winner this time? gaza its first visit from the head of state, the premier of qatat brings a massive construction plan. it is 7:00 in the morning in washington, 7:00 p.m. in beijing and midday in london. jimmy savile was once the uk's favorite tv personality as the start the 1970's and 1980's. he was untouchable. peace sexually abused potentially hundreds of girls during his decades of success. now he's dead, but the scandal has come alive, reaching the top of the channel he was associated with, the bbc. today and the head of the corporation is facing questions from a parliamentary committee about how much he knew of jimmy savile's behavior and the decision to drop a hard-hitting tv expos a of the man at another time the the shell was preparing a glowing tributes of the man. first let's recap some of the main points. george entwistle was asked about the extent of the abuse in the '70s and '80s. >> there's no question what jimmy savile did and the way the bbc behaved and the culture of the bbc seemed to allow what he did, there's no question this is a gravely serious matter. one cannot look back on it with anything but horror that his activities went on as long as they did, undetected. that's a matter of grave regret to me and something that the bbc and i need to demonstrate an absolute determination not to do everything we can put right. i am determined to do that. >> it was a long time. naomi, the question was raised, tell us about the pedophile ring? >> he was asked whether this kind of abuse was endemic at the bbc during these three decades or a for your decades we are looking at. he says is too early to tell. but he did say the bbc is looking at the possibility of 9 serious allegations, including people who still work at the bbc. we have the possibility that this goes beyond jimmy savile. >> it goes beyond just the issue of jimmy savile. we know that a hard-hitting program about the allegations was in the process of coming to light, a bbc program which was dropped at a time when the bbc was looking to put together a great tribute program to jimmy savile and put george entwistle at the heart of what he knew about the program. >> on the basis of what i now know, i am surprised that nothing further happened with it. it seems entirely appropriate that the editor has to own that they're not ready to proceed. there was certainly some good journalistic material. even if it was not the prospect of media transmission, a continued investigation -- >> eye witness statements about a criminal offense. >> it is important to say, why was the investigation stopped rather than the abuse being allowed to continue? and what should have happened corporately? >> george entwistle has called for two investigations on the way in which this has been handled by the bbc. let's pick up once again on the questions coming into him at that parliamentary and hearing. >> i have been accused of not having shown enough interest in the jimmy savile program. the key thing i needed to know was did they have something that they felt was good enough to proceed with. >> you failed. >> i don't believe i failed. i believe the system as a whole seems not to have got this right. >> you took part in that system. people in the organization talking about an investigation into a senior television personality in the history of the bbc. >> it needed the next stage of investigation. if i had been told that they received transmission from such and such a date, i would've made sure i understood all the implications and wouldn't act accordingly -- would have acted accordingly. >> it is the management structure that is a concern. it may be a reason why this incident developed. >> normally the system copes with the challenges and works well. there are real questions about what happened in this case. >> about being better informed. .> it's based on what we know >> you are sounding like james murdoch. >> i don't believe we did that. there's no question of anyone trying to turn a blind eye. what you know in detail is [indiscernible]. >> looking into jimmy savile, what did you think they were investigating? >> i don't remember reflecting on it. this was -- >> you are told one of the vote flagship investigative programs, one of the most iconic figures who you were about to commission new attributes to, and you don't want to know? >> what was in my mind was a determination not to show undue interest. >> why did she tell you, if you were determined not to? she presumably thought you would want to know and would have expected at you to know? >> i assumed she was preparing me for the possibility that i would need to think about changing the schedule. that was the information i took from the conversation. >> you knew that she was telling you that you might have to think about changing the schedule and you did not even say to her,? what is,? parts i have no recollection of asking. what it asking. >> it is a lack of curiosity. >> what informed my judgment is i did not want to do anything that would show undue interest. >> what area would have been interpreted as interfering in an investigation? >> i worry that all sorts of things people say and do regarding the bbc could potentially be construed that way. perhaps i was being overly sensitive. >> it seems that your determination not to show undue interest applies to everything at the bbc, from today's performance, not just the particular program. it's not just a lack of curiosity, although it certainly is that, but given that you are putting on these programs, surely you must have wondered is it's still a proposal to put on the programs still. is it still appropriate for the bbc to put it on tv? >> i did not ask that question. in my mind was that the investigation would not come to anything. i was waiting to hear if i needed to do any more. >> i find this astonishing that you would not -- there's a big difference between putting something on a program illegally and something that there's not evidence that you don't want to give a tribute program to this person. even though you might not have enough to stand up a program legally, it might still apply that it would not be a program to start showing tribute programs about the person. can you see that? >> i recognize that and i think our system needs to be more carefully calibrated to deal with the outcome and of investigations. the thing that was in my mind was if this had such allegations, i would end the broadcast. i recognize that we need to reflect on making sure we have a culture that does not run the risk of happened. >> you spoke earlier about a change of command at the bbc, which was quite revealing of a troubling culture. you wanted to find out something, you said that you would go to a divisional director, that it was pretty normal. i find that [indiscernible]. archie norman, if he wanted to find out what was going on in one of our stores, he did not go to the divisional director, he went to someone who worked on the shop floor to ask how are things going on the floor? the people will tend to know best are the ones who have their finger on the pulse. why is it inappropriate to talk to people on the shop floor? >> it's not i find it inappropriate. on any question, you need to ensure the division has a series understanding of what's going on. you should go to that division and report back. it's risky to run the possibility -- the right way to find out what's going on is to ask a division to get the facts and explain it. >> went they asked you earlier about the e-mail on the women, you said there was something not right in the culture of the bbc. you have been at the bbc 23 years. given that you are so adamant the culture is not right, what have you done about it in the past? >> as a manager, i have always striven to be even-handed and as sensitive as possible to both sexes and making sure the culture they worked was appropriate. >> maybe you should said to the general manager, do something about this. >> this is something we discussed at the bbc. >> but nothing ever happened? >> there is progress to be made, no question. question. >> is said there was no management pressure about pulling down the "newsnight" program and then new said -- you said there was no inappropriate management pressure. does that mean there was some pressure? >> managerial pressure is appropriate to make sure journalistic investigation is carried out properly. that is what i meant by a pro. -- by appropriate. andirrisi people on the trust know about anything to do with jimmy savile, the "newsnight" investigation, or any legal issues we have discussed today? >> i started to make the trust aware on the second of october after my conversation with police. >> even though there were allegations that the bbc news about last november -- >> i don't know what happened with respect to the trust then. >> do you think the bbc trust should of been told about this? >> i think the trust should be kept aware of anything important to the organization. i don't think the bbc trust should have been told about the "newsnight" investigation in its early stages. if the significance of what the "newsnight" had found had been recognized and properly dealt with by the organization at a whole, it may well have been the trust should be informed. i think it should be told when allegations are substantiated. there's a difference between allegations which been investigated and allegations which have been substantiated. >> we talked about the impact of the "newsnight" program, what it could add on your christmas schedule. were there any plans or thought to have a more permanent new series with a different presenter? was that something the bbc was actually working on at the time? >> i knew there was a possibility after the christmas special that a version of that show might be commissioned, but i don't know what came of that. >> had the bbc spent much money on that? >> i don't know. >> why -- if the bbc were considering a longer-term why did that not go ahead? >> attributed programs went ahead. >> what about the series you're contemplating -- you're contemplating, why did not go ahead? >> i don't know. >> are there any questions about you had not thought about asking yourself? >> i have seen various versions of this conversation with h elen. >> that's george entwistle facing a barrage of questions. the decision making and responsibilities, the channel of command within the bbc, asking him to clarify. a bunch of allegations that jimmy savile sexually abused possibly hundreds of girls during his time at the bbc and they're getting into the nitty gritty of the decision to drop a hard-hitting news program looking directly at those allegations about jimmy savile, wide was dropped and who by? astonishment from some members of the parliamentary committee as to the way in which that decision and the decisionmaking processes are taken. we will keep across this and will have more analysis later on gmt. let's get some other news stories. the heavyweight political boxing match is over. pre rounds in the tv debating bring together and neither president obama nor his challenger mitt romney could deal a knockout blow to their opponent. although mr. obama might admits he was already asleep on the canvas for the first debate. this debate last night was on foreign policy. mr. obama said that mr. obama had allowed a rising tide of chaos across the middle east. mr. obama accused his rival of being inconsistent on iraq and afghanistan. the candidates went head-to- head. >> the final head-to-head, this time on foreign affairs. they go around the world in 90 minutes. a large chunk of the time on the the threat of nuclear iran. >> one of the challenges we have had with iran is they have looked at this administration and felt it was not as strong as it needed to be. i think they saw weakness. >> the clock is ticking. we are not going to allow iran to perpetually engaged in negotiations that lead to nowhere. i've been very clear with them. >> the president denied reports that his administration would soon enter one-on-one negotiations with iran. mitt romney said that a war alone would not end violent extremism. >> we cannot kill our way out of this mess. >> he promised economic development and deterrence through u.s. military strength. his pledge to increase pentagon spending drew this response. >> you mentioned the navy and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916, we also have fewer horses and bayonets, because the nature of our military has changed. we have things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have shipped that go under water, nuclear submarines. >> the dividing lines or dinner on issues like pakistan, afghanistan, and syria. romney tried to turn the debate back to home. >> america must be strong in order to fulfil our role in the world. america must lead. we have to strengthen our economy here at home for that to happen. if you cannot have 23 million people struggling to get a job. >> they remained mostly composed. the president more fluent on issues he deals with day to day, the salinger working hard to sound like the commander-in- chief. and then the closing arguments. >> we have been through tough times, but we always bounce back because of our character, because we pull together. if i had the privilege of being your president and other four years, i promise always listened to your voices and fight for your families and work every single day to make sure america if it continues to be the greatest nation on earth. >> washington is broken. i know what it takes to get this country back. if we will work with the republicans and democrats to do that. -- i will. >> we will learn the verdict in two weeks' time. bbc news, washington. >> the mayor of qatar has arrived in gaza, the first head of state to visit in five years. sheikh hamad bin khalifa al thani will launch a $250 million rebuilding project. israeli leaders and some palestinian leaders on the west bank are not impressed. john is joining me. this is a moment in history. >> it is. they have prepared quite a welcome for the emir and his wife. they arrived early this morning and crossed on the red carpet. they're getting ready for a big rally at the football stadium. not many people lack a moment, but i feel the stadium will be full in a few hours time. hamas is very much trying to make political capital. the first head of state to come here. has become one of hamas' primary benefactors. has announced a further $150 million to go towards construction projects in gaza. >> these are huge amounts of money. and not everyday that qatar the israeli government would see eye to eye on an issue, but they seem to here. >> it's interesting because qtar is one -- qatar is one of the u.s.' principal allies in the region. some senior this as interference in palestinian politics. but money does not come for free. that qatar will want something in return. qatar is in a fairly unique position to put some leverage over hamas to get it to change direction. >> thanks very much. it's been a noisy parliamentary committee for george entwistle, the director-general of the bbc, still facing questions over the jimmy savile scandal. >> [indiscernible] >> i cannot. >> it was not vigorous. >> i believe the investigation was. looking at the bbc more broadly, i could only guess about what people did in the past with their motivation was. , but we did not do that. but neither did anybody else. >> [indiscernible]. >> they did on the third of october. for many years people say they heard rumors and allegations. no newspaper launched an investigation of jimmy savile that i'm aware of and no other broadcaster did. . >> that was george entwistle still dealing with questions on what happened in the past at bbc with regard to jimmy savile and in a much more recent times on the investigation into those allegations. much more to come. stay with us on bbc world news. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles. presented by kcet los angeles.
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 5:30pm EDT
was presented by kcet los angeles. by kcet los angeles.
WHUT
Oct 1, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> the time bomb of an aging world. the new report that calls upon governments to act now to avoid a crisis in the future. u.s. population is growing faster than any other in the world. we will have reaction from japan, already facing the challenge. hello, welcome to "gmt," with a world of news and opinion. the row over safety standards in the skies above europe. new proposals for flying rules. they're calling it the greatest comeback in golfing history. a european starter has left the american team stunned. midday in london, 8:00 p.m. in tokyo, where the united nations has published an alarming report about the rapidly aging global population. by 2050 there will be more elderly people than there are under 15 and the vast majority will be in poor countries, those least capable of dealing with the demographic time bomb. japan is one country that is already having to face up to the challenge. >> if the rest of the world wants to see what the future might look like, they need look no further than here in japan. their population is already aging more rapidly than anywhere else in the world. 30% of people here are already over the age of 60. driving from here in tokyo to the countryside, the men and women harvesting the rice are invariably gray-haired. the japanese population is not only aging rapidly, it is also shrinking at an alarming rate. the current population will shrink from 127 million to just 87 million in the next 60 years. the biggest challenge facing the japanese government now is how will they pay for the care of these elderly people with fewer and fewer young people to pay the taxes? some economists here are calling it a financial catastrophe in the making. >> that was rupert hayes in tokyo. we will have more on this, but the way, in a moment, but let's take a look at some of the other stories making headlines around the world today. nato has been concerned that three of their troops have been killed in afghanistan. the device is believed to be -- believed to have been detonated, killing an interpreter as well. the japanese prime minister has appointed a popular foreign minister to his cabinet. the appointment is being seen as an attempt to improve relationships with beijing after a period of high tension over disputed islands in the east china sea. 20 years in prison on charges of setting rebellion, human rights groups have condemned the conviction, saying that it is part of a continued campaign against government critics. the prime minister demanded in june that the journalist be arrested for allegedly plot to overthrow the state. tops go back now to our story of the aging population and the challenges of that across the world. our international correspondent has been following the story and joins us now from our london studio. in many senses, this is the price of success, is it not? >> it is a triumph that so many people are living longer. better nutrition, better housing, basically a result of the world getting richer. broadly speaking, this is taking place across the world. japan has the oldest population, but there are aging populations throughout the world. >> the problem, as you say, this is the price of success, but it also represents a challenge. these people have to be looked after, housed, and so on. the greatest challenge will be in the poorer countries, if i might put it that way. >> they do have an aging population, but they also have huge problems with their youth, the pressures on education, health and so on for young people. this is a major challenge for the developing countries. some of them have begun to address it. this is one of those issues that creeps up on you, like climate change. government pushes it into the next session of parliament, if you like, but by 26 feet there will be more people over the age of 60 than under the age of 16. in bolivia they now have an old age pension of about $50 per month, per person, which is beginning to improve matters. >> there are other kinds of things that these producers are talking about. >> it really affects every area of social policy. it is about health, it is about housing and long-term educating people to make themselves healthier so that they do not represent a drain on the state as they get older. it is about the opportunities and challenges. older people, with their experience and education, if they live longer and work longer, they can contribute. >> does your report give any sense as to what might happen if these measures were not taken? the kind of social crisis that might follow? >> it is clear that if you have a lot people that cannot cope as well as the can when they are younger or middle age, they cannot do their farming or go to work as often, there is going to be a major crisis. as i say, it is a crisis that has been gradually creeping up on the world. this is like an alarm bells saying that really have to address its. one generation away we will have more people over the age 60 than under the age of 15. >> the european aviation safety agency is setting out proposals to harmonize the flying times of all of the airlines in the union. they say it is especially important for the airplanes across southern and eastern europe, but it has been met with criticism by the british pilots union, meaning the pilots will be -- worried that it means that pilots will be flying for longer. >> it is complex, but we do have some comparisons here. three early starts in a row, potentially. in her out -- up to 110 hours, three pilots could drop down to two pilots, and it could even affect days off and how you are called to produce. they are saying that some of those protections are going to go. >> our transport correspondent there with those details. later in the program we will be talking to a former pilot and had a safety. it has been dubbed the miracle of medina, the team beat the americans by one. at the country club near chicago. danny swiss reports. >> what extraordinary drama we have seen, one of the greatest comebacks in the history of the ryder cup. people had written off the european team in the final day. they were already the underdogs going in on american soil, but somehow they pulled it out of the bag. the first key was the five matches won by the european team. the momentum swung dramatically towards the european team. then the united states rallied, thinking they might just take it, but at the very end a man with a fairly miserable seen retained the ryder cup for europe. at the end of the match on the final hole, tiger woods missed a short putt. they had want it out right. an extraordinary day of drama here at medina for the ryder cup team. they have maintained against all odds. >> and the said they will try not to gloat too much. an official inquiry is beginning in south africa into the killing at the platinum mine in august. striking miners were reportedly shot dead by police. it was the worst outbreak of violence since the end of apartheid two decades ago. more now from milton in johannesburg. how be killed will this inquiry be? >> actually, i happened to be at the civics center where the judicial commission of inquiry into the killings has already begun. it has been led by a retired judge, who this morning asked for a minute of silence, to stand up in memory of those who were killed during the disputed strike. today the judge is hoping that the commission, all the members of the commission, this three member panel and legal representatives of the party can go to the scene of the shooting to look and investigate further what happened. >> i think that the inquiry is going to take some months, but regardless of the outcome, the events have already sparked further industrial disputes across the mining sector, have they not? >> what has happened is south africa it is in strike and yes, indeed, you are right. because of that other sectors in the mining industry have joined the strike. we are currently also looking at the industrial dispute amongst the truck drivers. there are political ramifications. the governing party has agreed to a contest in december and there are various implications as to how they deal with the issue. >> as far as the americana miners are concerned, they did not get quite as much as they wanted, but a good deal in the end? >> they got a 22% pay rise, which is the difficulty. they circumvented the union system and went directly to the employer. other workers are now thinking they should dump the union and have a direct negotiation process with the employer. the unions are at pains in trying to convince their members that they are still relevant and still represent their best interests. >> milton, thank you. still to come, we are in germany to find out why the police there are after the country's hell's angels. tens of thousands of families are struggling to cope in the aftermath of deadly monsoon flooding across pakistan. it is estimated at 4.5 million people have been impacted by the floods. some claim that they have received little help from the authorities. a spokesman has said that the government has not yet appealed for foreign assistance. this comes as the european union announced additional funding a 50 million euros to help flood victims. >> making the best of a bad situation, children playing in floodwaters left behind by the recent torrential rainfall. for their parents, the damage has only brought misery. >> i have eight children badly affected by the flood water. all of my household things were washed away. my relatives are not with me. even this bed is not mine. >> officials say that more than 400 people have been killed this year. makeshift encampments provide shelter for those who have survived but lost their homes. some flood victims claim that the authorities have not done enough. >> i did not get anything. my children have been living on the side of the road. >> rainfall this year has been significantly less than 2010, when floods put one fifth of the country under water. scant consolation for those whose livelihoods have been devastated and whose futures remain uncertain. >> remember, for more on the that the floods that have swept across pakistan, had to our website. there you will find the latest news and analysis from correspondence on the ground. the flooding is affecting millions of people. this is "gmt from "bbc world news." headlines -- the time bomb of the aging world. governments are being devised now to avoid a crisis in the future. the skies above europe, new proposals for airline pilots flying rules from british pilots. jamie is here. these are new on employment figures? >> not dramatically higher, but it is not nice for each one of these people being put out of work either. statistically, it is not a fast rise. what is worrying is the continual increase the goes on every month. we got down to 11.4%. figures from july were revised upward slightly. fairly level, but all the time moving up. yesterday from ernst and young, looking at the whole of the euro, they could get up to 12% by the end of next year, which is a frightening level. the other interesting thing is where they are hitting, putting strong austerity measures in creates high unemployment. this is what one spanish medical student explained. >> i am worried that i will not be able to find anything of mine. it is difficult to study and work like this. >> one thing that this woman said was that if she did not get a job in spain, she was going to move overseas. there will be an enormous amount of migration going on around europe. there will be a lot of movement. move on to mining. i do not know if you would call it a merger or takeover? >> technically it is a merger, but most people are calling it a takeover. glenn ford, a commodities trader. not a mining company. they do get the stuff of the ground. initially it was a very comfortable deal that both sides really wanted. the sticking point over the price seems to have been sorted out. there's also the sticking point of how much the executives would be given to keep them there. they are a very good team. that has been put to one side. those, the takeover is going to go ahead. john explain to us how the deal works. >> they have financed and supported that group for many years and the companies are close, but they trade at an arm's length distance. in reality there is a lot that goes on between these companies. they are pulling the mining expertise in to say that there is more money to be made in mining at this point in time and even more to be made by trading commodities. >> talking about the future there was promising. one thing to mention is how happy they have been with the arrangement, there have been many arguments about who will be maintaining what. a good combination, these companies together. >> that you very much. in russia, the appeal hearing for the members of a punk rock group, was a riot, has been adjourned. they were sentenced to two years in prison for singing a song that mocked vladimir putin. they say they doubt their conviction will be overturned because the case is part of a wider crackdown on critics of the russian president. fiercely contested parliamentary elections in georgia, there has already been in -- already been numerous incidents of violence. damian mcginnis is in tbilisi. >> this is the first time in a decade that the ruling party has been seriously challenged. since coming to power in 2004, his pro-western government has ruled without any serious opposition. he says the country will be thrown back to the crime and chaos of the 1990's if the ruling party is ousted. >> a lot of things are being decided right now in our country. for the future development of our country, for what happens to the european people in this part of the world and what happens to the idea of democracy in this part of the world. >> these are the most unpredictable elections they have known since their on attendance. on the one hand, you have the president's ruling party credited with saving the country from being a failed state. on the other hand, there is an opposition coalition led by a billionaire businessman who earned his money in russia and the 1990's. more than 400 western observers are here to check the polls. georgia is keen to join nato and the european union. the new election could be seen as a litmus test for the country's democratic credentials. both sides have accused the other of playing dirty. whoever loses is going to dispute the results. >> all of these observers are observing the democratic process today and looking at how people are participating. many have said this, they have urged a peaceful process. >> most voters have no appetite for more revolution or civil war. after a particularly ugly election campaign, with both sides saying it is a fight between good and evil, emotions are running high. >> police in germany are mounting a major campaign against the country's hell's angels. in recent weeks there has been a series of raids where police say that they have seized weapons. the hell's angels say that they are being unfairly targeted. >> the hell's angels of germany. just motorcycle enthusiasts? or something much more sinister? they do have legitimate operations, like clubs, but police say that there is also an illegal side and turf wars over these big money activities have turned violent. at their berlin club, they complained that the police targeted them unfairly. >> they are attacking our families. they shot our dog. they destroyed our apartments. this is nothing to do with real police work. >> four months the authorities have targeted the hell's angels, pulling them over and searching them. their homes are rated by heavily armed anti-terrorist police. >> there is a perpetual cat and mouse game now between the hell's angels and the police. they say they are obeying the law, but they are invariably stopped. >> police say that the evidence is there, that they're not just the eccentric tough guys. some chapters or branches have been shut down. the government is debating a national band. >> since 2004 we have arrested more than 500 biker gang members who have received over 380 years in prison. >> berlin is a hub for hell's angels. crucial for expansion. stephen schubert is about to publish his in depth study. >> berlin is crucial for globally operating by her clubs looking to expand. if you can control berlin, you control east germany. from there, you can conquer eastern europe. >> police shown no sign of loosening pressure. they have alleged that the hell's angels provide the muscle for protection rackets and run prostitution and drug rings. but in forcing a complete ban would be hard. steven evans, bbc news, berlin. >> a reminder our top story here, the united nations said the number of older people is growing faster than any other age group and more needs to be done to deal with the consequences in the developing world. the u.n. population fund says that the number of people over age 60 will be over 1 billion. there is plenty more to come, do stay with us. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." aleppo under siege, we discover countries may be discovery -- offering support for to the opposition. >> you can hear the sounds of battle still going on. snipers have been shooting. >> hugo chavez came to the victory in the as well as a presidential election. what does he have in store for his next term? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. a team has uncovered evidence which could prove that syrian rebels are getting military assistance from the gulf region. rebel fighter base in aleppo, our journalist found weapons creates a trust to saudi arabia. our correspondent and cameramen filed this report on the battle for aleppo. thousands of years of history have marched through the streets. an ancient city that has been fought over many times before. today, aleppo is at war again. the further you edge into the old city, the sound and fury of battle grows. those who stayed behind must cheat death every day. a simple sign reads, do not cross, sniper to your left. seven or eight people were killed to last week, he says. the rebels have moved into the path of the old city. activist took us there. a world heritage site where the scars of battle run deep and the devastation is mounting. aleppo is a city under siege. the fighting is now street by street, house by house. the fighters have been calling for outside help for many months. for the first time, a strong indication they're getting it. the ukrainian weapons firms made the box and its contents for the royal saudi army. how would ended up in the roiled -- in a rebel base in aleppo is not clear. interests, both sides get help from abroad in a proxy war that threatens a fragile region. the atmosphere on the front line is incredibly tense and almost eerily quiet. you can hear the sounds of battle still going on and the scars of this intense fighting are obvious everywhere. snipers have been shooting into this position. the mirror, the rebels have been using to get a sense of what is going on. you can see what the government response has ben, massive firepower to crush the rebellion. the rebels and residents have no answer to a barrage of artillery that does not discriminate between the fighter and civilian. the fighters tried to move on seen towards loyalists forces. despite its overwhelming strength come the government forces have made few inroads. we were shown one of their check points, just 200 meters away. they may be fighting for the future of syria, but both sides are struggling over small bits of turf. the empty streets are a testament to the thousands to have fled. some say they have nowhere to go, nowhere is safe. he has lost his wife and six children, all of them were killed when a rocket landed on his house. >> to live is to die. bashar al-assad is a daunting task. you will die wherever you go. they say foreign aid is being provided, but we see nothing. just let us die and get it over with. >> aleppo has become the defining battle in this civil war. neither side can afford to lose, but in truth, neither is winning. what does seem to be happening is the slow, painful death of syria. >> aiding the rebels in syria was one of many issues which mitt romney touchdown during a foreign policy speech in virginia today. charging the obama administration is sitting on the sidelines, he did not offer specifics, but laid out this policy. >> in syria, i will work with our partners to organize those members of the opposition who share our values. they obtained the arms they need to defeat the tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> mitt romney in virginia today. for more on what he had to say and how foreign policy is playing his campaign, i am joined by our foreign policy correspondent. thank you for coming in. how would president romney differ from president obama? >> i cannot tell how it would differ. he does say that he would go so far as to arm some of the rebels through our partners. the way the paragraph is carefully constructed come a gives the impression that he would arm the rebels. if you read it, it says it through our allies. that is what we are doing. that is what we're doing to begin with. not very different. >> you were just in iran, what did you make of mitt romney's strong words on iran? >> he talks about how he would not lead iran did away with having a nuclear weapon. already, barack obama has imposed the harshest sanctions in history on iran. it is hard to imagine any other president being able to do that. george w. bush was not able to impose a similar level of sanctions. it took obama going out there and saying that he would meet with the iranians. that allowed him to form his coalition. i do not -- i really am waiting for mitt romney to lay out specifics on how you would be different than obama. >> how did he talk about what happened in benghazi and the death of the ambassador without seeming to exploit it? >> he sort of said obama botched the response to benghazi. frankly, his first response was not the best response. he botched his first response in terms of coming out swinging, politicizing it to soon. there is a hesitancy for him to politicize it again. there is this window opening for mitt romney and he wants to take it. you can say the administration dropped the ball, they did not anticipate the terrorist attack, they left americans vulnerable. >> there is no mention to of president george bush. why is that legacy avoided? >> there is a real debate within the camp. there is a kind of -- you do not know where he stands. in some places, he has a former bush advisers who are real and neocons. in others, they're much more moderate and really believed international institutions, will want to empower natural institutions. we have not seen where he comes down and we're not sure whether he is a neocon or a realist or aim moderates. he keeps giving these speeches, but he does not nail it down. we're trying to figure out him as he does. >> maybe we will find out more in net foreign policy debate. the about this campaign, u.s. policies towards china has been a point against -- between the candidates. congressional committees called for to chinese telecommunications companies to be banned from the american market. they pose a security threats because they cannot be trusted to be free of chinese state interest. the companies denied the charges. >> congressional officials have been investigating the two huge chinese telecommunications companies for a year. now the house intelligence committee has alleged that they may be spying and not to be trusted. >> they see to expand in the united states, but as a result of our investigation, we did not have the competence these two companies can be trusted with infrastructure of such critical importance. >> the committee sounded convince the chinese state uses as cannot on the grand scale against america. >> we started looking at the new threats that has been prolific in the last few years from the chinese government when it comes to cyber as spinoffs, human as panache -- cyber and spinoffs, human espionage. >> they are among the world's largest manufacturers of phone and tablets and a network infrastructure. it keeps the global network moving. these companies connections to the chinese state and military are not well understood. the intelligence committee has urged they'd be barred from buying or merging with american companies and that their products not be used in any u.s. government network. they maintain these concerns are just not legitimate. >> we are of business, we are profit driven. we're not gone to sacrifice $32 billion of business and our future success for any government. >> to do we trust to build our networks -- to do we trust to build their networks? anybody but the chinese, says the u.s. house intelligence committee. these are the most direct warnings we have that of cyber spying by chinese companies. it is up to the obama administration to decide whether or not to act on them. >> a look at some of the day's other news. there is a warning that the government in afghanistan could collapse after the withdrawal of the western combat troops in 2014. i think tank based in brussels says president karzei's government is increasingly unpopular and plagued by corruption. nato says it disagrees. british and japanese scientists will share this year's nobel prize for medicine. they're working independently, but they both revolutionized the understanding of how mature cells can be reprogrammed to perform new functions. for years, he has been a thorn on the side of u.s. policy in latin america. he a good job as has been reelected for a fourth term as president. -- to vote chavez has been reelected for a fourth term as president. he promises to continue this socialist revolution. >> this had been billed as a tight race, but in the end, the results came quickly after the final polling stations had closed. it gave mr. job as a clear 10- point lead. -- mr. chavez a clear 10-point lead. >> to those who are always trying to deny all the good things that happened in venezuela, invite them to dialogue, to debate, and to work together. >> his followers were jubilant. >> he has given free health care systems, he has given houses. >> we have the best president in the world. the women love him and we're going forward and we are growing. >> just as the politics and venezuela is on the rise, others will be commiserating. opposition candidate standing for a coalition of parties conceded defeat. with its promises to maintain social programs but also encourage private business, he managed to mount a serious challenge for the presidency. in the end, it was not enough. mr. chavis was treated for cancer earlier this year and many will be watching the state of this help closely as he began another six-year term of office. for now, his supporters are thinking only of celebrating. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." in the wake of anti-weapons protests, we speak of the forces driving the unrest. a rocket launched by a private company is on its way to the international space station with food, clothes, and equipment. one giant leap for business kind. >> left off of the space falcon rocket. >> this moment is a milestone for nasa. the launch of a new generation of spacecraft, which introduces the private sector to space exploration. the company spacex is behind the mission. >> one minute and 10 seconds after liftoff. >> on board, carrying supplies of food, clothes, and equipment. it is not all about work. there is some chocolate ice cream for the residents, too. the move does come about partly because of drastic cuts in spaces's -- nasa's program. >> the sustainability of the future of their exploration program and this is a huge step. spacex has been impressive so far. >> dragon continues -- >> this was the first time a privately owned craft docked at the international space station. >> it looks like we had a dragon by detail. -- by the tail. >> this is another step towards commercializing the space industry. that will depend on the success of this mission. >> we have seen violence, anti- western protest throughout the muslim morals. sparked by an internet video. long before we all lived on line, 20 years ago, it was a bucook. the years he was forced to live in hiding. now he has written about his experiences in a new book. he joins me earlier today. >> when you're writing "the satanic verses," did i ever occurred to you that it would cause a fence? >> they did not like any of my other books either. nobody is forcing people to read it. i was trying to write a serious book. yes, it is a skeptical or secularist view of the religion. the religion of the book is not called islam. it is very heavily fictionalized. >> have you ever regretted writing it? >> i have been asked this question once a week for 24 years. the answer will always be no. i think it is a good buck. -- good book. people are finally being able to read it as a novel. young people, they are just coming to it fresh. some people love it, some people do not like it. >> you did not have an ordinary life. you were in hiding. you had an alias. what was your state of mind? >> very up and down. the first couple of years were very difficult. going back and looking at my journals at that time, which i have not looked at since then, it is quite obvious the person writing the journal's is very often in a state of the depression. it got easier, i felt, once i was able to begin to organize some kind of political resistance and develop a campaign with the help of a couple of human rights organizations and france to try to put pressure on european and -- your pet -- european governments to put pressure on the iranians. >> in this book, the heroes seem to be york literary agents from both sides of the atlantic and the police protection officers. >> i got to know them. he lived in the house of people and get to know them very well. you get to know their families and the stories. the police have a very dark sense of humor. that did help in those days because they were always cracking jokes. >> when you look at the protest happening across the muslim world, this time in response to a video, what do you think can be done to lessen the tensions between islam and the west? >> everybody has to get used to the fact that in free societies, people are endlessly insulting each other. uc cortines every week which attack the pope -- uc cartoons every week which attack the pope. that is how we have to be. democracy is an argument. people strongly disagree with each other and we have to accept it. >> we see the tensions, so what should our political leaders be doing? >> i am a novelist. >> you have had a lot of time to reflect. >> this freedom of speech, it was won against the catholic church, actually. most of the world that does not have it really wants it. go ask people in china if they want to have free speech. we have to defend it. the trouble with defending free speech is that you often defend garbage. free-speech is not just for people renting fine bucks. it is also for people making -- four people riding fine books. it is also for people making trashy videos. >> this painting can fetch tens of millions of dollars. yesterday, one of those campuses was defaced in london. the man has been arrested, but said he is not the van gogh. he said he increased the paintings of value. >> this is the 1958 painting. a fine example of his abstract art. defaced by a man who considers his actions to be neither illegal or destructive. he thinks he has increased the value of the work and has no regrets. >> i am very happy. i can have a good laugh. i am sad because people cannot see what it is all about. >> there is a long history of the interventions involving art works. because people cannot it is a tradition in which he >> most of them are temporary or they are done with permission. this one was not. this one was quite destructive. >> the trouble facing places like this is they have an unwritten contract with the public which goes along the lines of undue security measures would the artwork. incidences such as the one that had just occurred early to put that principle under pressure and a gathering think twice about being so open with their art work. the late american artist to gain their work in 1969 is not alone in having a painting attacked. last year, the 17th century painting was sprayed with red paint. leave the work of art being placed behind glass. a move that would diminish the enjoyment for many. for now, that is not the intention. the focus is to repair the painting. they should be able to do, according to this restorer. >> there really knowledgeable. they got to depend really quickly. there is absolutely every hope that it will be cleanedthinks ts not belong. off and the painting will be back to how we used to be. for many, it is not an appropriate form of artistic and expression. but an act of vandalism. >> that debate on vandalism versus freedom of expression will continue. that brings today's shows to a close. you can find constant updates on our website. check out our facebook page. thank you for watching. tunein tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
WETA
Oct 9, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." in >> this is "pc world news america." the german chancellor visit to athens and take a look at the welcome she received. austerity wreaks say it is her fault. >> here to show support for their great people but on the streets, there is huge frustration. >> defying the taliban for a girl's right to go to school, this girl shot at close range. the first talks about his front- row seat. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. these were just a few of the things that greeted angela merkel on her trip to greece today, the first trip since the crisis began to show her support for the austerity plan. but the greek people blame germany for the economic hardships they are suffering. today, they cut their frustrations i haunt her. >> no post-war german chancellor has the reception quite like this. groups comparing her to the not these for insisting on austerity. large parts of the capital were sealed off by her visit. 7000 police deployed, water cannon on standby. it read her note to the fourth reich. we challenged this woman as to how she could portray her as hitler. because, she said, what is imposed on greece is like a naughty scheme. the vast majority were not anti german but anti austerity. >> look at what is happening here, what the measures are bringing. >> she was given full military honors of the airport. and on her way into the city, her convoy was jeered. with the doctors and nurses trying to block the street. >> she is here to show support for the greek people but on the streets, there is huge restoration. in just five years, this economy has shrunk 23%. just a short distance from where she was meeting, protesters attacked the barricades. for two hours, there were running battles with the police, volleys of tear gas being fired. the greek prime minister if he believed that the visit marked the end of greece's international isolation. >> everybody that the on greece collapsing will lose the bet. greeks are proud people. they deliver support for greece to stand. handoff and despite the fact this is a difficult path, it will prove worthwhile. if you don't get to solve the problems now, they will reoccur later in a much more dramatic way. >> in difficult times lie ahead. greece has to make further savings to qualify for more funding. without it, the country runs out of money in november. they said greece is likely to miss the target. >> for more on the less than hospitable welcome she received just a short time ago, seeing those pictures in the report of people wearing uniforms, it makes you wonder if it is possible for germany and greece to be in the same financial house. >> there are many that would ask that. the intense anti-german feeling, references are not the overwhelming opinion. there are the other greeks that say that he had can't blame germany for our problems, we elected a government that mismanaged the situation and borrowed money that we did not have. that intense animosity is now predominantly felt here. from the government, and open arms welcome. the government is intensely aware that relations have hit new lows within the last few years by this tabloid animosity. the government realizes it needs to reach out to the german government in reset relations. greece depends on german cash, and that sort of extremely strong unity is what you saw today from the greek government. >> you were on the streets of athens, wasn't brave or insensitive? got that as a question of what posts to myself when i got hit by a volley of tear gas earlier in the afternoon which left my eyes streaming data show me with a toxic impact. as i nursed by sore eyes. in those days it was brave, other cell was insensitive. her visit has added fuel to the fire for those that see her as the architect of austerity. they say it is a sign of respect that she came to this country and we're glad that she came to speak to the president offered a show of support and endorse their place in the euro. in rebuilding the credibility abroad, he will be very delighted by her visit today, the first visit in over five years. >> in pakistan, a brave teenage girl that gave international attention for speaking out against them and campaigned for girls to get an education has been shot and seriously wounded. she was on her way home from school when gunmen opened fire on her schoolus, shooting her in the head and neck. she survived and the doctors say she is out of danger. >> liberal that defied the taliban. she was shot at close range for standing up against militants and insisting that girls have the right to go to school. this was her and her beloved classroom when they tried to take it from her. she refused to back down. in 2009, militants controlling the valley decreed that girls' schools must close. then just 11, she voiced her opposition written under a pen name. this was her injury for january 3. >> i was very scared of getting ready for school today because they announced that the girls should stopped going. our teacher told us that if we come, we should not wear a school uniform and where normal clothes. only 11 attended class today. >> after the militants were driven out, they campaigned for recognition for girls. letting the current glut -- recognition and threats. she will fight on if she makes a good recovery. >> she would never give up her education. she will continue to inspire the other folks. that they are going to surrender. >> the threat may not be over. after the attack, they said she was pro-west and will not the spirit. tonight, she is said to be conscious and responsive and hospital with her family by her bedside. how brutal attacks are nothing new here, but the shooting of this young girl has caused horror and revulsion. human rights campaigners say it sends a very disturbing message to anyone campaigning for women and girls. >> and dangerous times for a very brave girl and pakistan. became a mild controversy, jury sandusky who served at penn state university was sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 45 counts of sexual abuse. the scandal led to a flood of allegations in the tarnished a once revered sports program. >> the disgraced codes that traded his truck sued for prison jumpsuit. he arrived at court, protesting his innocence. he spoke to a college radio station. >> they can take away my life entry as a monster, but they can't take away my heart. in my heart, i know i did not do these alleging disgusting acts. my wife has been on only sex partner and that was after marriage. >> she listened as her husband died of child abuse. he was contradicted by three gunmen that gave emotional accounts of being touched in showers. prosecutors praised the courage of the victims. >> reliving the events, when they were to have the victimization exposed. a one of them could have walked up -- or walk away from this case but they chose to testify truthfully and demonstrated personal courage and the desire to see justice done. >> curious and does he use his prestige to impress vulnerable boys. rityets up a youth chairt that prosecutors called if factory. the 68-year-old fallen hero who will most certainly spend the rest of his left behind bars. >> a quick look at some of the other day's news, israel's prime tester has announced there will be an early general election. the election was due for another year, but he said it would take place as soon as possible. his coalition government has been in power since 2009. the radical clerics has pleaded not guilty. the conspiracy to set up a terrorist training camps inside the united states landed in the u.s. on saturday after a very lengthy legal battle against extradition. the nobel prize in physics has been awarded to scientists have invented different ways to measure and to study quantum particles. it was carried out by a french and american scientists. findings can open the way the superfast computers an incredibly precise clocks. authorities say that the body of one of the country's most brutal drug lords has been snatched from a funeral parlor. it was confirmed that the man that went by the alias the executioner had been killed in a gunfight with marines. >> news from the mexican government's point of view was mixed. they were brought down in a shootout, and after initial doubts, they confirmed that it was definitely the of the drug kingpin of the most wanted men in mexico. >> of the protocols of unidentified bodies, they carried out a comparative analysis of the bodies. the result was confirmed for those of the national fingerprint database. >> what followed was cause for real dismay among the local authorities. the body was snatched from the funeral home where it was being held, presumably members covering the remains of their leader. the government hoped it would be a positive example of the military strategy has only gone to further illustrate the power that they will then states. the outgoing president will doubtless feel pleased that he is no longer a threat in mexico. a deeply frustrated that the authorities don't have the body to show for it. he is now a shadow of their former self and lack a clear leader. >> more outfalls have still to come on tonight's program, we will have the latest on a meningitis outbreak in the u.s. that has left 11 haitians dead. a secret agent that infiltrated the ira on behalf of british security services says he has been abandoned by those who serve here if he testified on the organization and one of the biggest criminal trials in irish and british history. dodge ram and gilmore infiltrated the ira at the height of the trouble in northern ireland. he later earned himself an ira death sentence. >> i have saved countless amounts of lives. gosh living under a false identity for 30 years, he has been filled by the intelligence services. >> i have no financial stability, which i was promised. i have nothing. >> he is now taking his case to the investigatory powers tribunal, a body that examines complaints against the intelligence services. he is still remembered as a traitor, guilty of the trail. unexpected,t come and that when the mi it's done with them, they discard them. >> how they care for it, it is now being employed. >> to invoke trade organizations, where you are in the world, it will always be needed. have the honor your death to them. got to they do not comment on intelligence matters. -- >> did not comment on intelligence matters. >> now to a growing health scare in the united states. contaminated shot has led to an outbreak of meningitis. the 120 cases have fallen ill and 11 people have died. how does the infection occurred? the chair of vendor built preventive medicine department joins me from national, tennessee. i know n.y. is the case with -- the state with the most cases. do you know how this whole contaminated mr. arroyo was brought to the states? >> in came to us from a compound in pharmacy in new england which supplies similar drugs to many states. we happen to have had, from the contaminated batch, a substantial number of doses and we now have a substantial number of patients, unfortunately. >> how rare is it? >> is already naturally acquired in a very uncommon. but in this fashion, to inoculate a contaminated medication immediately adjacent to the central nervous system and have the infection take place that way is almost vanishingly rare. >> and aledo how many there are in the country of these contaminated steroids? >> there were approximately 17,000 vials. yes, 17,000 vials. some patients received more than one inoculation. if there is a silver lining to this very dark cloud, the attack rate, the proportion of people that receive this medication continues to be fortunately quite low. or 1%. it is a large number of people but not as large as it could be. >> they say 13,000 patients have already been exposed to these infected steroids. how do we determine who is at risk of contracting it? >> we have tracked down all the people that receive the medication. they have been put on the alert so if they develop that a symptom that all that could be in any way related to meningitis, they go promptly to their doctors had to be tested. that is how we determine the number of cases. >> what are the symptoms and possible treatments? >> headache, fever, chills, stiff back, nausea, and even stroke-like symptoms. the treatment has to do with a couple of drugs that are challenging to administer. have to be given intravenously and have serious side effects. the have to be taken for a prolonged time like weeks, maybe months. >> does it make you concerned about these zero conditions or lack of sterile conditions that they might produce? dodge we are very seriously concerned about that. the food and drug administration is in the midst of examining all those circumstances. the laboratory has been closed and is no longer shipping medication of any kind. we will wait to see what happens. >> the best of luck for you to be down there. quite alarming prospect there. attempt to set a world record for the highest skydive was abandoned because of poor weather. the high winds prevented him from launching the helium balloon and capsules designed to take him 22 miles above the earth. hope that their plan to free fall will still take place in utah later this week. just four weeks from today, americans will go to the polls and vote for the next president. the commander-in-chief has been followed every step in but not until the obama administration videographer became a fixture at the white house. he has become the first to take of the post and has written about his experiences in a new blood. >> i was handed the world's best set and the world's best cast of characters, all i had to do was hit record. >> what i take away the most from my time is actually not all of the amazing glamorous things that happened, it is ordinary things that can become so much more surreal when you have the lens of the white house. >> 03 of these, these two, five of these seven roles. >> you always go through the back of the elevator and use the service elevator and use backs of kitchens. i really tried the highlight of lovely atmosphere, to show the monday and aspects of this amazing institution. he >> the privilege of a very special guest today so i will let a man. -- him in. >> hey. [applause] >> ip data very young age being my documentary subject the president of the united states. after filming the same person for five years, it is something between meditation and a cruel joke. you can't do the same manhattan over and over again. their fourth one is designed for you to work in 2014/7. it is n ful full of computers and copying machines. i think that is why the burnout rate is very high. every single scrap of everything i take, someone comes their finger and swearers or something is a focus and i talked over a shot, and all those in the national archives. for me, it means that anything i felt like accident and on purpose will be available to the public in five years. think about it, a scary proposition to shoot the leader of the free world on tape so much. everyone knew that barack obama was the kind of person that would not be affected by its, that this is being allowed the happen. >> i know he is tired, but that was one heck of a job. program to aoday's close. you can get updates on our web site and if you would like to reach me, you can find me on twitter. thank you so much for watching, i will see you back again tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can wdoou for y? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 19, 2012 4:00pm PDT
what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america," from washington. a massive bomb blast rips through the heart of beirut. fears that the violence and syria has spilled over into lebanon. the u.s. presidential candidates blanket their base. an actress makes a big impression on the silver screen. she takes it all in stride. >> it is great to have that attention but not too much. i don't want to get too excited. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are fears that the conflict in service is spilling over. an official has been killed by a huge car bomb in beirut. the leading opponent is bashar al-assad. syria's leader is being accused of being behind the bombing. >> they rushed to eastern beirut. this was as the weekend was about to begin. the bomb went off in a crowded mainly christian district of the city. local tv stations were broadcasting images of burned out cars and images of wounded people. 8 people were killed and as many as 100 were injured. the main target was a brigadier general, the chief security official in lebanon. he had recently implicated syria and its lebanese allies, hezbollah, for the killing of the prime minister. he was a fierce critic of syria. this will create shockwaves in the entire region. after a long time of relative calm, this is the first big attack in four years. many feared something like this to happen sooner or later and that lebanon would be dragged into the conflict some political leaders have accused the assad regime in syria of being behind the attack. >> for more on the incident from of volatility out of the region, i spoke a brief time ago with a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. does this bombing show the conflict has spread into lebanon? >> it has spread to the heart of beirut. it has been spreading for a couple of months, the border areas mostly. we see this with the sunni-shi'a tensions excel rating. this is the big move into the capital. >> one politician has said that the syrian president is behind the bombing. is that a credible claim? >> yes, the head of the information bureau, the intelligence in lebanon, that was investigating the role of -- who was backed by damascus in carrying out a number of bombings. this is a clear message to back off inside of those factors. >> lebanon and syria, the politics go hand in hand. many of the same sex in each country overlap and families overlap. it is very hard to be a fool on war in the regime in damascus for that to not eventually to come over into some kind of turmoil in lebanon. >> i remember seeing of the enormous crater caused by the assassination of the prime minister. what does this portend? >> it means we're going back to a time now where the regime in damascus is starting to lash out into lebanon and to affect the politics there because they know that upset in that would ultimately upset the balance for the u.s. and its allies like israel and the region. this is a sign that this is getting much worse, it is not going to go away anytime soon and this is spilling over its borders into lebanon. >> could this lead to clashes between sunni and shi'a in lebanon? >> yes, it already has. in this case, it will immediately undermine its investigation. it could see the court case affected. this would be a big blow against those who are against syria and lebanon. we have to worry about that. >> do think that they will be trying to calm the conflict in his own country? >> bashar al-assad's mo is to escalate the situation. to calm it down. this is a ruthless strategy. it is working until now until we get some kind of international intervention. i think that is alternately inevitable. >> thank you. >> tomorrow, it will be a year since the uprising in libya saw the caption and killing of colonel gaddafi. libya had an unexpectedly peaceful democratic election this summer. the country is still struggling to overcome the legacy of 32 years. our middle east editor reports in libya. >> they have captured the dictator. they miss him. a year ago, their son was the one who found colonel gaddafi hiding in a drainage pipe. as a revolutionary hearing, he posed with the gun that he took from gaddafi. his parents still have it. his son died after being tortured and captured by men still loyal to their dead leader. at the same time, he was tortured by gaddafi's people, hung upside down, ripped, burned, and given electric shocks. female nurses cut his ankles and said it was the flesh of misrata's rats. both were held in the last refuge. this week, he has been under attack by fighters loyal to the new order. during the civil war last year, walid helped to defend misrata. this was the center of the war. steadily, it has been rebuilt. their victory museum is here, but when in the peace, unravelling gaddafi's legacy is taking time. -- but winning the peace is taking time. the regime is likened to a bottle of cola that had been shaken for 40 years. the civil war has not been restarted. it could have been much much worse. colonel gaddafi possible leadership compound is being used as a rubbish dump. parliament is struggling to form a central government. there are dozens of collisions with their own agendas. >> i don't believe the situation will deteriorate dramatically. if it did, libya could go back to tribal rule. that would solve its problems easily. >> if the democrats cannot started governing soon, the divisions in this country might overwhelm them. time is not elastic. >> afghan police say that at least 18 people, mostly women and children have died in explosions in the north of the country. a roadside bomb cut through a minibus carrying a wedding party. another deadly explosion, this time in yemen. 40 soldiers at a military base. it was thought that a car bomb was set off by al qaeda militants. the chinese navy is conducting exercises near disputed islands. ships and military aircraft have been sent to japan. tensions between the nations have risen since the japanese government bought some of the islands from a private landowner last month. the former prime minister, silvio berlusconi, has made a rare appearance at his trial for allegedly paying an underage prostitutes for sex. he told the court that he never had an intimate relationship with any kind with the moroccan- born dancer. she was 17 when she attended one of his private parties. he said that he believed her when she said she was 24. here in the u.s., there are just 18 days to go until the presidential election. barack obama and mitt romney are spending so much time in a handful of states that still up for grabs the mason gain residency there. no republican has ever won the white house without winning ohio. this is not the first time that the students have rushed to hear a democratic president make his case. >> it was packed with people. >> joanne was here in 1964 when lyndon johnson drove into town and set out his bold vision for tackling poverty and racial inequality. >> i've helped to build the great society. >> the cornerstone was a government program to help the poor and elderly. today, joanne worries that mitt romney would like to dismantle them. >> people need to know that they need those government programs so that they continue that everyone can get help. >> mr. obama does not have an lbj style big vision for his second term. he says his opponent has no vision at all. >> you heard of the new deal, you have heard of the fair deal. mitt romney is trying to sell you a sketchy deal. we are not buying it. >> ohio has benefited from billions of dollars in bailouts for the auto industry. it has won mr. obama a lot of support. >> that affects one in 8 jobs in ohio. i don't think that you can be from ohio and talk about jobs without recognizing that. >> i think that we have some momentum. this will be like a square rather than a wheel. away from the liberal college campuses, they're not so convinced. in a way, the state represents what this election is really all about. it is a philosophical, almost moldavite between those who believe that government money has helped ohio and those who think it just as fervently that the government only gets in a way of the natural entrepreneurial spirit. mitt romney is campaigning hard here. >> it is freedom that drives america. >> introducing him at a rally was this woman. >> i am not a politician, i'm a businesswoman. >> our business is baskets. >> this is a vision of my father who was a classic american entrepreneur. he believed that if you were going to make a statement, do it big. certainly, a seven story basket makes a statement. >> they employ 1000 people in ohio and thousands more across the u.s.. crating paychecks is the job of businesses, not government. this president believes that government can help, should help, will help. >> quite frankly over the years, i would like less government involvement in helping me run my business. >> ohio is critical and elections because it is a microcosm of america. it has a diversity of people, life styles, and prospectus. how does people vote ultimately determines who will win the white house. >> both campaigned by the polls in ohio. when the the major cities has a lesson or two for gridlock washington. columbus has traded jobs and encourage investment. the democratic mayor worked with republican business leaders to get results. we spoke with the mayor about this rare show of bipartisanship. >> we have to have a balance between cuts and revenue. we did not want to impact of the quality of life in the city of columbus. i went to the business community and said, i have to ask for a tax increase. i was concerned that some of those businesses might go somewhere else. businesses are very mobile these days. what happened was that they ended up supporting a tax increase and helping to finance the campaign that the public ended up supporting. we passed a tax increase. we passed the lowest -- the greatest recession in the city of columbus. >> if you did that here in columbus, is this something that can be done nationally? if you sides of the economic debate will not alone talk to each other let alone to operate. >> in order to have prosperity, you have to do both and it could be substantial cuts. >> she managed to get republicans to sign on to that. they're not doing so in washington. >> you have to have cuts and revenue. i went to the business community. i think they understand. they know that they cannot cut their way to a profit. they have to do a couple of things. they have to be more efficient, work in the market, and sometimes they have to raise prices. we do a combination of those things, you usually end up in a better position than where you were. you cannot do one sometimes without the other. >> you did it in columbus, how come they cannot do it in washington? >> it is baffling. it is a political problem. how do we do this? we asked their opinion. bring them into the formula. it is not just the white house versus congress, democrats versus republicans. what is your opinion? how do you do this? i guarantee you that they will do something like we have done. there was the stability in the country and the progress in all of the communities. >> speaking to the mayor of columbus ohio. do remember to stay with us for full election coverage including the debate. you are watching "bbc world news america," still to come. remarkable signs of recovery. doctors help the girl shot in the head by the taliban. a year ago, it would have been unthinkable. now, the u.s. has invited from month to partake in the joint military exercises. this brings military's from across the region. this is a sign of improving relations with the u.s.. the u.s. is taking a symbolic step. >> what we know is that burma is on the last -- on the list of those invited. we don't know if this invitation is final. this is only an invitation that is an observer. this is with mostly u.s. and thai forces, the longstanding allies. they usually bring in the forces of many neighboring countries as well. bringing the burmese military in would be a very dramatic step. the military is the most controversial part of the old regime in burma. they have already ended economic sanctions. this encourages those that are put in place. there is significant human rights concerns about the way that the army deals with the on commitment to the democratization process. this is a very separate power structure. i think any moves to close ties with the military between the u.s. and the burmese military in particular will be criticized by human-rights groups. we have a way to go before there are substantial ties in terms of military training. clearly, the u.s. would like to move very quickly. this tells you how fast they want to close the gap. >> some positive developments from the doctors treating the pakistani girl shot and the head by the taliban. they say that malala yousafzai is able to stand for the first time and communicate by passing us. she was shot for criticizing taliban militants and supporting education for girls. >> a teenage girl at school. on remarkable around the world. valley, this swat is an act of defiance. this almost cost malala yousafzai her life. she was shot in the head. her story has generated worldwide media focus. doctors have been getting details of their patient. "she was shot just above her left eye. it raised the brain as it passed the temple. it tracked down, damaging her jaw joint on the way and ended up in the muscles above her shoulder blade on the left. we have quite an extensive injury. >> it is remarkable that she survived. >> it is very remarkable. >> the journey to britain began soon after she was attacked 10 days ago. initial surgery removed the bullet. then, the decision to remove her to the queen elizabeth hospital where the staff have extensive experience treating injured british soldiers. "she is doing remarkably well. she was beginning to stand with help from the therapist and the nurses. she is clearly a understanding what we say. she is able to write. >> the government of pakistan has recognized her bravery with one of their highest awards. the medical team hopes that the same courage and determination will help her fight off infection and make a full recovery. >> malala yousafzai's progress. now to another girl capturing attention. she is the star of a low-budget film, "beast of the southern wild." she was just seven when filming ended. now, the industry is abuzz as she could be the first ever actress so young nominated for academy award. >> she plays a hush puppy who have to care for herself and her father when their home is hit by natural disaster. it has been gathering rave reviews. many think an oscar nomination for the 9-year-old. do you think it will happen? >> may be, if it happens it happens. people have been talking about you. how does that feel? >> kind of good and it is fun to have that attention but not too much because i don't get too excited. >> what about being famous? >> i don't like that either. "she might not have a choice if she does go on to be the youngest person ever to win a competitive oscar. she was just five vinci auditioned. even then, the director said that her talent stood out. >> we never saw anything like that at any kid of any age, let alone one that was 5 years old. she could barely read the script but she could perform it. >> since then, the movie has surpassed all expectations. many believe that the film and its young star on their way to making history. >> what will she wear on the red carpet? that brings today's carpet to a close. you can find constant updates on our web site. doocy what we're working on -- to see what we're working on any time, be sure to visit our facebook page. thank you for watching and have a good weekend. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - i love strawberries! and today we're going to the enchanted garden to pick some! and then we're going to learn how crayons are made at the crayon factory! i'm so glad you're coming with us! be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - good morning, neighbour! (yawning) strrrretch with me! reach your hands up, like this! stretch, stretch, stretch. rrrah! that felt grr-ific! come on inside!
WHUT
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> a fourth term in office for hugo chavez of venezuela. he says the revolution lives on. a bigger than expected turnout gives him a clear lead. he says then he will be a better president. hello and welcome. i'm george alagiah with a world of news and opinion. also in the program, the u.s. congress bars to build chinese telecom companies from takeovers or mergers. it's as there are security threats. a warning on afghanistan's future. in the report forecasts collapse and even civil war after foreign forces have left. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the evening in beijing, 7:30 in the morning in caracas. hugo chavez has extended his 14- year grip on power in venezuela. the vote was his narrowest victory, but it gives him another six-year term to continue venezuela's socialist revolution. his victory may irritate his detractors in washington and elsewhere. the votes pit the president against the young candidate henrique capriles, who vowed to open the country to private investment. now this report from caracas. >> this had been billed as a tight race. but the results came quickly in the end after the final polling stations had closed and gave hugo chavez a 10-point lead. >> to those who promote hate and social poison and those always drawn to deny all the good things that happen in venezuela, i invite them to dialogue, debate, and to work together for venezuela. >> his followers were jubilant >> . he won because he had given free education to all. he has given free health care assistants. he has given housing for poor people. >> we have the best president in the world. we all love him. we are going forward and we are growing with him. >> street parties broke out over caracas almost as soon as results were announced. venezuela is polarized. although some people are celebrating, others will be commiserating. the opposition candidate .onceded defeat wit he mounted a serious challenge to the presidency, but in the end it was not enough. mr. hugo chavez was treated for cancer earlier this year and many will be watching his held closely. for now, his supporters are thinking only of celebrating. bbc news, caracas. >> the u.s. congressional committee has called for two giant chinese telecommunications companies to be banned from the american market. a draft of report by the house intelligence committee says they cannot be trusted to be free of chinese estates influence and so pose a security threat to the u.s. and its systems. the two firms denied being influenced by the chinese government. john sudworth is in shanghai. what is the reaction there to this congressional hearing? >> there's been a statement out by the chinese foreign ministry suggesting that the chinese telecommunications companies operate within the law, but they have gained their success through their own commercial competitiveness and that they should not be singled out by u.s. congressional committees for criticism in this way. so it appears the chinese government is already lining up in defense. this is a damning report from an official body singling out two companies by name and suggesting that they simply have not done enough over the course of this investigation to demonstrate that they are free from influence from beijing. >> my understanding is the foreign ministry has done slightly more than just condemn this. have they not said this is the result of some kind of prejudice in america of chinese companies? >> in a sense, that is in the context in which there is a kind of growing focus on the issues of their trade and open access. i think we are beginning to get the sense that china feels, particularly in the run-up to the u.s. presidential election, that it is being unfairly targeted. i think the foreign ministry statement times with some of with.entiment -- chmeimes some have suggested that there are many and non-chinese companies that do assemble their products in china. the suggestion, therefore, to imply there is a security risk only attached to chinese companies is not fair. we have heard those things said in defense of these chinese companies today. >> thanks very much. let's catch up on business news. i bet you have a thing to say about this ruling. what are the business implications? it's a congressional hearing. >> absolutely. the implications on these two chinese technology giants, one of them is the second-largest provider in terms of equipment manufacturing in the world. the other company is the fourth largest. serious implications. both have a very ambitious plans to expand their markets in the u.s. the u.s. is a large market in terms of telecommunications. both firms have seen an increase in sales of their mobile devices. the espionage peers have limited the companies being able to move into infrastructure networking. they had to unwind a purchase of a u.s. computer company because it did not win regulatory approval. one of the company's employees 1700 people in the u.s. revenue in the u.s. was $1.3 billion last year, more than double what it made in 2010. given this report suggesting the u.s. government should bar any merger of those two chinese companies in the u.s., it could have serious implications monetarywise. >> the european stability mechanism is replacing something that i don't remember. >> a big day for the euro zone. let's hope leaders had a restful weekend because it's going to be a busy week. the finance ministers from the euro zone all meeting in luxembourg today. they launched this new mechanism. it was supposed to kick off earlier in the summer, but there was a german court ruling to say that it was not against the constitution. the rescue pot is 500 billion euros. spain is probably at the top of the discussion, given the spanish government still refuses to ask for a full-blown bailout. euro zone leaders will try to nurture the spanish economy through the troubled banks. first on the list will probably be a bailout for the spanish bank. greece is also a big worry. the european central bank on the ground but in a report card together. they cannot seem to come to agreement between the lenders about the next round of cuts to greece, which could delay the next round of bailouts for the country. the next question is can the country afford a waiting game? >> among issues is the progress for 2013. it's been relatively ok, because most of the items have been approved by the troika. so much of the additional services measures of $13.5 billion, now they look more less set. nevertheless, we need some further write-down of greek outstanding debt burden. if the imf or to participate in the program, then it would need sustainability. the forecast for the economy for the next year, the debts are not sustainable. >> i want to take you back to the mergers and acquisitions story regarding china. we hear the term "trade war." >> some say that it's kind of smells of that. given the global economy is worsening, we start to see more and more trade spats, especially targeting those goods that are made in china. we have a string of spats between the u.s. and europe versus china. we have had threats by the u.s. taking china to the world trade organization over what it calls illegal subsidies to chinese carmakers and the chinese car parts. there's a solar panel dispute with europe, europe alleging china is taking part in anti- dumping practices. . and there is the rare earth experts tell me it will be the u.s. and european union that will play the harder game -- who will fight the harder battle in this game, given the high unemployment in the u.s. and european union and the huge amount of debt they have. >> and an election happening next month. >> something like that. >> thanks very much. let's look at some other stories making headlines around world. the united nations secretary general ban ki-moon has expressed deep concern about if the escalating clashes between syria and turkey. he has described the cross border shelling as extremely dangerous and has appealed for international action to stop the flow of arms into syria. turkey.oss to southern james reynolds is. our is what is the atmosphere like now? there was shelling yesterday. -- james reynolds is our correspondent. >> i've spent the morning over there and now i have come back to a bigger city that's 45 minutes away. there was still plenty of tension particularly along the main road facing syria. and army tank was pointed at sites directly toward syria. not many people on the frontline. as you got back from the front line, there were people in cafes eating and drinking and one man was taking money out of the cash machine, and a garbage truck was going around picking up litter. there was some normality, but schools are not reopen because their word about shellfire hitting the schools. people want their territory to be defended, but they wanted to go about their normal lives without worrying about mortars hitting them. >> is there any chance of the political or military establishment in turkey that would take this further than what we have seen, these skirmishes? >> that's a good question. if you look at 30's history over the last 30 or 40 years, there's been a divergence between what the civilian government wants and what the military wants. the military wanted a final say for many years. in september there was a case in which the civilian government was able to punish military officers who had been planning a coup. that was seen as a final statement that the civilian government now has a final say about matters inside turkey and about what happens with regard to military affairs outside the country. if the prime minister does not want turkey to get dragged into a full-scale war, it looks like he will have the authority over the armed forces that his predecessors may not have had. >> thank you very much. greatest football showdown between barcelona and rail madrid has inflamed passions among palestinians. more than 3000 people in south korea have fallen ill after a major chemical leak that has caused "60 minutes dollars of damage. an explosion at an industrial plant in the southeastern city on september 27 killed five people and lead to a league of hydrochloric acid. more than 500 acres of farmland have been damaged and hundreds of villages have been evacuated .o emergency shelters - our correspondent lucy williamson. >> at the moment when it happens, five people killed in the explosion. there have been investigations looking at whether it entered the water system or whether the air is still contaminated. the government has said their initial investigation showed that there's no poison of a sufficient level to pose a risk to humans, but they will continue their investigations. they are at a very early stage, so people are waiting to see what the more in-depth investigations. may panel >> the libyan prime minister has been forced to step down after parliament rejected his second attempt to form a cabinet. he was the country's first elected prime minister after the overthrow and killing of moammar gaddafi last year. libyan state television said that more than 60% of the parliament had no confidence in the prime minister's latest proposals. a quarter british citizens -- one of four british citizens in bali. she and three others were held in may by police in bali allegedly importing 4.8 kilos of cocaine, worth 2.5 million u.s. dollars. the italian coast guard has had a dramatic nighttime rescue helping 166 refugees escaped from their boat just moments before it sank. this is gmt from "bbc world news. i'm george alagiah. the headlines. -- another six years in office for hugo chavez to continue what he calls his socialist revolution. politicians in washington warned that two chinese telecom firms pose a security threat to the u.s. the war in afghanistan has entered its 12th year. the end is in sight for many foreign troops stationed in the country. however, a new report by the international crisis group warns that civil war could break out and the government collapsed when nato troops withdrawn in 2014. the brussels-based groups has highlighted elections scheduled for 2014 are likely to be fraudulent unless president karzai does more. to ensure a more. for more on this i'm joined by andrew north in kabul. -- the 2014 elections are likely to be fraudulent unless does more torter nikarzai ensure fairness. >> perhaps what is most significant about the report is the reaction to it from many western critics of the government an. on the afghan government side, they see this as part of a continuing campaign of pressure. it comes just days after president karzai lashed out at the foreign media over what he called psychological warrant over the gloomy predictions that are coming out almost by the day over what's going to happen after the-2014 would drawlthe- -- president karzai lashed out at the foreign media over what he called psychological war over the gloomy predictions that are coming out almost every day, after the 2014 withdrawal. western leaders are trying to manage expectations back in the u.k. and other places. the british prime minister said that people should not expect afghanistan will be a perfect country with a perfect government, a few days ago. it's those kind of comments that feed into a fierce here that the west is trying to pressurize the afghan government. -- feed fears. >> finance ministers will meet in luxembourg in a few hours. spain's financial problems will be high on the agenda. the economy is in recession and unemployment is the highest in europe. for young people, the situation is particularly difficult. more than half of them are unemployed and many have moved abroad. tim metz some who moved to the u.k. -- tim met some. music is full of passion, but sounding increasingly frustrating and angry. lines of job-seekers have grown as well as protests. u.s. unemployment now exceeds 60% -- youth unemployment. these three people have given up on barcelona and are trying their luck here. correct the situation in spain is bad. >> was it sad to leave spain? >> not really. >> i studied marketing in spain and all the companies are closed. >> there's a lot of unemployment in the u.k. >> it's better than in spain. >> the number of people leaving spain is rocketing. the country's national statistics institute says that around 40,000 left in the first six months of this year. that is up 44% from last year. the u.k. is becoming an increasingly popular destination. around 77,000 spanish people are now thought to live in the u.k. the figure has risen by almost a third in five years. to work here you need a national insurance number. a rise in spanish applications exceeds that of any other country except pakistan. >> over the last few months, people had started to lose hope. i would say the recession has lasted long time. for a time people thought maybe things would change. now people say where's the light at the end of the tunnel? " there's more competition for british and still is looking for jobs. >> they will learn english and they will learn useful things and get training. it's good for spain in the medium run. they will come back. >> tony moved to the u.k. 45 years ago and hiring spanish- speaking staff was once a problem, but not anymore. >> people are asking for work every week. i only have room for about 10 people. >> what effect will it have on spain the fact that so many people are moving away? >> there will be a hole in the population. so many young people with degrees and experience, all unemployed. they are leaving. a country needs that. >> none of these four friends know precisely how long they will stay in the u.k., but they agree on one thing. for now, they have no plans to return home. bbc news. >> the latest clash between the spanish giants barcelona and rail madrid ended with a drawl. it was the visitors who took first blood courtesy of cristiano ronaldo. messi claimed his second goal an hour into the match. over the home that again, 2-0. some of barcelona's most passionate fans watched from across the mediterranean sea in gaza. the latest encounter between the two teams was about more than just football. now this report. >> a beautiful game is a passion in gaza. barcelona is a particularly attractive team to palestinians living here and in the west bank. not merely because the spanish side features supporting greats such as lionel messi but because some palestinians feel a bond. it was a belief that barcelona had invited this man. gilad shalit is a former israeli soldier held hostage five years in gaza by hamas. he was finally released last year. hamas called for palestinian fans to boycott the game by refusing to watch it live. the head of the match, palestinians sympathized with the militant group. >> football is a sport we like when it carries the message of freedom and love. but we are against it when a soldier is invited, because then it makes people the victims and the aggressors. >> barcelona tried to avoid a diplomatic row but also inviting palestinian delegates to the game, but to no avail. the clubs saw to clarify its position in a statement on its web site. -- the club sought to. >> barcelona has always wanted to promote peace and harmony in the middle east. >> many fans did watch the game in the coffee shops of gaza, but the row is an example of how few things stay out of politics in this part of the world. >> a british researcher named john gurdon and a japanese professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Oct 29, 2012 4:00pm PDT
companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." hurricane sandy bears down on the u.s. east coast bringing with it walls of water and if he robberies winds. millions are in its -- and ferocious winds. nervous residents heed the warning to stay indoors. and with just weeks away until election day, sandy sends the presidential contest for a loop. no one wants to play politics in this storm. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. hurricane sandy, one of the biggest storms ever to hit the united states, is bearing down on the east coast. nine states stretching from north carolina to connecticut have declared a state of emergency. 50 million people live in the storm's path. usually bustling cities have been brought to a stand still. this is the scene in manhattan where a crane is dangling from a 65-story building. a monday m manhattan unlike any other. the city that's supposed to never sleep is eerily quiet, awaiting the storm. subway stopped. even wall street not trading. the -- >> we're used to coming down and the water calm, much, much slower. it's over the banks and the storm hasn't gotten here. it makes me nervous. >> the impact of hurricane sandy is starting to be felt. high winds and crashing waves along the east coast. >> good morning, america. breaking news on the halloween superstorm. >> morning tv shows left americans in in doubt the storm severity. >> 15 million people in its path. >> storm preparations take precedence over campaigning for next week's presidential election. mitt romney canceled his events for two days. barack obama returned to the white house. >> the center of the storm is going to hit landfall sometime this evening, but because of the nature of this storm, we are certain that this is going to be a slow-moving process through a wide swath of the country and millions of people are going to be affected. >> the holbrooke family are leaving nothing to chance as they prepare for the storm to do its worse. >> if we get a lot of water in the back yard it could lap over so we're going to sandbag that when we're done filling the up water here. we have a ton of food upstairs. most of it is nonperishable. if the refrigerator goes out we can eat for days. >> thousands of flights have been canceled, creating chaos for travelers. this family is from cornwall, making theirstis to new york, now won't be able to know when they'll get home. >> it was nothing on the radar when we left home. also the concern of delays going home later in the week. i think, yes, this is really quite anxious. we'd rather come at a different time. >> this is a once in a generation storm with the potential to kill and flatten. millions of americans embrace for the full impact. >> we go live to laura who is in brooklyn. earlier you were in manhattan. how have things changed recently? >> well, the wind is really picking up, and so have the rain. the east river where it meets the hudson river and the new york harbor, the water is beginning to rise. you see that storm surge. and that's even before the hurricane has made landfall, and that's even before the high tide here in new york, which isn't due until 9:00 tonight, not for another few hours. but remember we have high tide already, even before the hurricane, because it's a full moon. you have these strange astronomical high tide. it's weird confluence of events. and new york is really bracing itself for what this storm will bring. you can hear the sirens behind me. will it bring massive flooding? will it bring power outages? there are dedicated storm chasers out there but most of the city is inside hunkering down, bracing for what's to come. >> lawyer awe, we are -- laura, we're looking at the scene in new jersey, the waves coming your way are massive. what are people anticipating overnight in the city? >> well, i think the worst-case scenario overnight in the city is there will be flooding in all those low-lying coastal areas like the one where i am now which is supposed to have been evacuated. nearly 400,000 people who have been told to evacuate and the worry is there will be flooding of the subway, that could flood. the electricity substations in lower manhattan, they're underground for historic reasons, they could also flood. this could cause massive disruption to the city, so people on the edges of their seat just waiting for this to come. the worst of it will be overnight and when we wake up tomorrow morning we'll see what the storm has brought. >> it's amazing, laura, looking behind you a few seconds ago, there were peopl strollialg ther people are still out taking a look at this storm. are they safe? >> well, you know, there's t actually reaches ple hours new york. worst of it is not -- officials have been coming up to us when we were broadcasting saying, you need to move, ladies. this is dangerous. it is dangerous. we were sitting in our car earlier and it was rocking from side to side. that's how strong the winds are. really only the fool hearted and dog walkers and the most dedicated storm chasers are out at the moment. winds up to 80 miles an hour are predicted. very dangerous, clearly, but not yet here. >> ok. and the most dedicated correspondent, make that man get his dog back inside. thank you so much in brooklyn. well, let's now go to the coast of new jersey which has been feeling the brunt of sandy since early this morning. ocean city and atlantic city already getting a lot of flooding. there is a mandatory evacuation in that area, but some people have decided to ignore those warnings. earlier i spoke to michelle, the executive director of the regional chamber of commerce in ocean city, new jersey. she said thousands of people delayed evacuating and now they're stuck on the island. how many people have been evacuated from there, michelle? >> most of the people have been evacuated. we're a small barrier island. during october we have a lot of people that are leaving anyway for the winter. we do have a lot of people, though, that have stayed, probably 8,000 people that have stayed due to they thought it wasn't going to be as bad as it is and then they were unable to get off the island. >> ok. we're looking live pictures of new jersey. the storm swell looks huge. what does it feel like to you when you look at your window? >> it's unbelievable. it really is. we're seeing swells on the water between 20 feet and further for -- with a beach, the waves. and wind gusts 60 and above and we're just starting to get the storm hitting our coastline. we know high tide is at 8:00 tonight. we're all just hoping for the best at this point. the streets are starting to get high -- reich a high tide again and we have two hours to go. >> we're seeing pictures of maryland. exactly the same scene. your husband is the mayor of ocean city. how nervous is he today, michelle? >> he was nervous. he was out and about making sure people that could times we. they were still evacuating people that wanted to leave. he was down there helping, doing that. a lot of businesses, too, helping boarding up that didn't have the proper stand-by for things locked up so he was out there doing that. very worried. this is a storm of a lifetime for us and we're just hoping and praying that everyone, you know, stays inside, takes notice not to go outside and beware of the next 12 hours are really important to ocean city, new jersey. >> ok. of course, more to come overnight, michelle, as those winds pick up. joining us from atlantic city -- ocean city. thank you very much. well, here in the nation's capital, the big affect from this storm. earlier today i went to the emergency office in washington, d.c.'s mayor, vincent gray, to hear about his plans to keep the city safe. in the city 16 years and i've never seen washington looking and feeling like it does today. describe the mood in the city today for me. >> well, i think people are taking it seriously. this is a very serious, perhaps the most severe storm of this type that the city will ever experience. we've asked people to please get off the streets, stay off the streets, go home, stay home, and people really are adhering to those warnings. we appreciate that. and we're doing everything we can to try and prepare the city to be able to mitigate it. >> as mayor of the city, what are you most concerned about? >> well, i'm concerned of course about power outages and getting people's power restored as quickly as possible afterwards. the potential of flooding. we have areas where we know we have flooding even when we have serious rain. we worked hard. we have the sandbags out. 16,000 distributed across the city. we worked hard, also, to get leaves off the ground, if they back up, that will make the flooding problem even more severe. so we've done everything we can to mitigate those circumstances, again, the power outages, the trees coming down and potentially crashing into people's automobiles or into their cars and the potential -- >> is it a dangerous storm? >> it's a very dangerous storm. when you have winds predicted to be as much as 60 to 65 miles an hour, consequences could be quite severe. >> you are eight days away from a major presidential election. what kind of political impact could this hurricane have on it? >> well, you know, i think so many people pay so much attention to this election. it's actually hard to believe there are people still debating whether they're going to go for one or the other candidate. i think the storm, the consequences of the storm will have passed enough for people not to be impeded in terms of their ability to vote. i hope that's the case in other parts of the country. we hope this won't impede people to go out and vote. >> thank you very much. both mitt romney and barack obama have suspended their schedules just days before the voters make their choice. for more on the storm's impact on this race, i'm joined by the bbc north america editor in florida where president obama was supposed to be campaigning today and bridgette in cleveland, ohio, the state where governor romney was supposed to be stomping today. let's start with you in florida. i'm incredibly jealous. pouring with rain here in washington, d.c. it must feel a world away, both weather-wise and politically. >> yes, it does. we woke up here this morning thinking the president wag going to launch his campaign. we knew this was going to be a big moment with bill clinton rolling out the big guns, if you like, and that was all canceled rather suddenly just as we woke up. so it was really strange knowing he was flying back to cope with a crisis while the rally went on and the normal things you hear at these rallies, the political campaign was going on. and the storm was mentioned by bill clinton but really not heavily. only in passing. and i think people are obviously talking about it to a certain extent. it's not in the front of their minds. what it does politically, conventional campaigning has ceased. it takes the two candidates off the media. i don't think people will be interested in them anyway. the normal style of campaigning has stopped. i don't mean politics has stopped. i think this is an important political moment. but the normal stuff of campaigning is over for a few days at least. >> bridgette kendall in cleveland, ohio. ohio only on the edge of hurricane sandy but right at the center of america's political storm. what do they think the impact on mitt romney's campaign is going to be there? >> the winds and rain are rough here in cleveland. nothing like being experienced on the eastern seaboard but, yes, today there was a big drop . we were thinking mitt romney and his vice-presidential candidate, paul ryan, were determined to carry on campaigning even though the president was going back to washington and suddenly at midday trfs an announce from the campaigning, because of the sensitivity of millions of americans facing this emergency from the hurricane, mitt romney and paul ryan are canceling all their events for today and for tomorrow. and so it turns out this will be the last time that mitt romney will be seen on the stomp in public probably for a couple of days. so he's taking himself completely out of the picture. in ohio it's been clear from the speeches that they don't think they clinched -- this is a critical state. he needs ohio to become president. and these rallies are important to get people to talk to their friends and relatives to encourage them to vote or encourage them which from thinking they might vote for mr. obama to mr. romney and that doesn't seem to be happening right now. i think it ought to be hurting the campaign a bit. >> mark, very briefly. this is really a chance for the president to explore that illusive quality of presidential leadership in the campaign. >> this is what -- who deserves to be president. people are looking towards him, how does he lead, how does he speak for america? it's a real opportunity for him, but if he gets it wrong, that is a very big black mark just days away from the election. >> yeah, this storm, no one knows how it will play out politically. thank you both very much. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program -- as china gets ready to hand over power to a new generation, the residents of one rural village talk about their expectations. >> a former bbc governor says that jimmy was kept away from children in need. jones, who was chairman of the charity, said he had suspicions about the former tv star a decade ago. his comments come on the day of whether the corporation's child protection and whistle blowing policies are respectable. david reports. >> a different is in need at the moment. >> thank you and thank you very much. >> back in the 1980's, jimmy -- >> here is the world famous -- >> but a few years later he was banned. quietly behind the scenes, the chairman of children in need decided to keep him away from the charity telethon. there were rumors, suspicions. >> some of the staff of the children in need were apprehensive. words like flicky were used. it's very important to me, it's important to the staff of the children in need. it's a wonderful charity. >> so there were doubts. new research suggests there has been a decline. the polling firm asked two questions. do you trust the bbc? and are you proud of it? and he compared it with figures compared back in 2009 and in both the figures have gone down. in terms of pride, 76% in 2009, 62% now. and do you trust the bbc? again, it's gone down. 62% to 45%, less than half of it. and it's restoring trust in inquiry which was beginning its work. >> i've been a -- >> to police the bbc, many new something. together they might have seen there was a pattern. david, bbc news. >> let's take a look at other news from around the world now. syrian state television is reporting that 10 people have died when a car bomb exploded in the suburb of demascus. it's believed children were among the dead. opposition activists say the syrian air force has launched attack on rebels. it's the largest air strike. it may be hard to believe today, but for several years syria was a refuge from violent. many iraqis escaped across the border and tried to make a life there. but as the war in syria escaladed, tens of thousands of iraqi families had to flee again, coming home to a country that's still not safe. dozens of civilians died from bomb attacks. now on what the refugees are returning to. >> now many families sought sanctuary in syria are back in baghdad after escaping for their lives. they're lining up to help them start again. stress has taken its toll on this person's health. and his children told me they wish iraq was safer. with no home to come back to, the whole family is now staying with relatives. he said he was forced to leave everything he ha in baghdad when his younger brother was ki d >> it was the gun that ruled when i left. the americans were here and it was chaos. now some things are bette some are not. >> the capital of baghdad is a city on constant guard. a city choked by chnts. police and government ficials are being assassinated virtually every day. and offici say al qaeda in iraq ino rrouping. after watching his brother die in front o him, he's atruggling. much-loved brother by aomb captured by aystander on a mobile what happened that day in july still haunts him. >> i can't sleep, not a wink. our whole family has been destroyed, especially my mother. >> iraqi families are no longer couped up at home as they were in the darkest days of the civil war. but a power sharing agreement between shiites and even kurds has led to political pa rale cis, and sectariism still lives below the surface here. -- paralysis and sectarianism still lives below the surface here. this is still a traumatized society, and there are now the war in syria could reignite sectarian tensions here. more than 200 civilians have already been killed in violence this month, and many here mourn e futu they hoped for. >> the regional impact of the war in syria still not fully known. in just days, china is due to make an announcement which has huge future and for the rest of the world. the lineup of new leaders is due to be unveiled it he communist party congress that starts next week. it's a leadership change which only comes once every 10 years so every day this week our china correspondents will be reporting from different locations and look at the huge economicnd social changes of recent years. martin starts us off with a village arhe great wall. >> for centuries this village has lane in the shadow of the great wall. they've known hard times but they say the village has been transformed in the last decade. i feel like i'm living in heaven. in the past there was never enough food and we always went hungry. but now the government supports me although i'm not wealthy, i have more than enough. few young people work the land any more. many have higher paying jobs outside the village. some of them have become successful entrepreneurs. this man makes his money selling sausages and has spent $60,000 on building a new store. he says it's vital that the village continues to develop. >> everyone here wants to have more money and hopes our village becomes richer. it's important we keep developing so we're not laughed at by outsiders. >> life isn't always easy here, but the villagers have become used to these times. and the new leaders will be needing the expectations. >> and we will be happy to report from our correspondents all week from around china. and a quick look again at our main story before we go. hurricane sandy, which is now edging closer to the eastern seaboard of the united states, we've been given an advisory it will hit within the next few hours. you can see the picture there live from maryland. enormous waves. big winds packed into this storm, and the worst of it, of course, hasn't come. it will hit landfall in a few hours' time. it will be overnight before we see the worst of the damage. new york city normally bustling at this time of day, almost deserted in the streets. you can see a crane there on top of the 65-story building, clearly had some problems with the wind. and again we won't know the full impact of the storm for a few hours yet. but millions of people live in the path of hurricane sandy. tens of thousands are being told to evacuate. washington, d.c., i have to say, i have never seen the city looking like this, eerily quiet downtown. the streets totally deserted in the nation's capital, of course, we'll be getng the impact of that storm as well. that brings today's program to a close. of course, you can get update on this superstorm anytime you look on our website. if you want to find me, i'm on twitter @kattykay. see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation has been made possible by the freeman fountion of nt, anrk, stowe, vermod honolulu. newmans own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was presented >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles. - hi, neighbour! today we're going to visit my school for the very first time! and then we're going to my doctor's office to see dr. anna. will you come with me? ok, let's go! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to 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going to visit my new school. do you go to school? i'm going to see what my new school will be like. will you come with me? i'm feeling a little nervous.
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>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. just hours ago, the stage is set in denver for the first television debate between barack obama and mitt romney. >> it is not just a choice between two candidates or two political parties. this is a choice between two different halves for this country. >> this is an affinity for us to describe the path way forward for america. the american people will have to make their choice as to what kind of america they want. >> how will both candidates win over the millions watching? we take a lesson from history books. our other top stories, turkey strikes back after a sheriff in -- after a syrian mashel kills five people on the turkish side of the border. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. one stage, at two men coming tens of millions of viewers. barack obama and mitt romney are getting set to square off for a televised debate. -- one stage, two men, tens of millions of viewers. for the first time, we might finally hear details on just how they plan to do it. our north american added there is in denver for us tonight. >> when the candidate stake to the stage tonight, they will want to convince the people that they speak their language. sometimes it is more of a stretch. >> [speaking spanish] >> obviously, they will not be speaking spanish tonight. the largest growing ethnic group could be critical in this election. there is going to be even more importance in the future. quarter of all americans under 18 are latino. canvassing in colorado, a swing state where the latino vote is hugely important. now, some are disappointed that he has not done more to help the illegal immigrants that come across the border. a few find this election a hard choice. >> we know that there is only one candidate that supports any kind of immigration reform that is of any real value and of course that is obama. romney would turn back any progress we have made. >> a lot of republicans see the hispanic vote as a huge prize. what has gone wrong? when ronald reagan said that latinos were naturally republican, he met that they were aspirational and socially conservative. mitt romney seems to turn them off. he backed a law in arizona which some said was racial profiling. he called for a high-tech fence along the mexican border and struck a hard note talking about illegal immigrants. >> the answer is self deportation, people decide that they can do better work here because they don't have legal documentation. >> the campaign has put on a burst of speed, intensely targeting latinos, especially in swing states like colorado. the latest poll gives obama 70% of the hispanic vote. romney has backpedaled and the written policy with a much softer focus on illegal immigration. some say this is a chance to touch home the new message. >> throw away the rhetoric, the language that turns people off, and talk about it in a real leadership way. >> as night falls, the intense preparations are at an end. they will soon face each other for a debate but some say will shake up the race for the white house. >> so, how significant is tonight's debate? i am joined by the national editor of "a vanity fair" magazine. thank you very much. obviously, these debates have been analyzed for their significance. given the context of this election, how significant is tonight? >> it could be significant. the balance of the evidence suggests that the challenger has to gain in the first debate. he has the most -- obviously, mitt romney has the most to gain. he also has the most to lose. if he cannot show himself as a possible candidate, he will not turn around the trajectory. president obama has high stakes. he is on the defensive. he has to show people what he has in store, but just by being on the same stage with him, mitt romney gains in stature. >> at this stage, is anything more that we will learn more? this is so choreographed. we all know what they're going to say. we're going to see barack obama make mistakes in the debate. he said to mitt romney -- the line he said to hillary clinton, you are likable enough. neither one is apt to make a huge gaffe. >> who is undecided? this is all about. >> tiny amounts of people. tiny amounts of precincts in states. in some ways, it might not be mitt romney's last chance that it is his last best chance to break through and show people that he cares about them, he cares about their problems but that has been an issue for him. he has advantages on some of the other issues. so much of these debates is about the body language, the social clues. do they look pleasant? did they look like someone you want to have in your living room for the next four years? that will be important. >> in terms of the immediate impact of this debate, will we know after the media has pored over all the tricks and turns? >> we will know what the consensus of the media is. there are these polls, they will have some polls as early as tomorrow. we over analyze everything. i suspect in the next 48 hours, something will jell about what the outcome was. >> what about specific voter groups? president obama is ahead in the polls when it comes to women. can mitt romney appeal directly to women voters from this platform or is he really -- >> he will have to try. he will have to try to make himself acceptable. the problem that he has had for so much of this year is connecting with people as real people. people see him as too rich, two out of touch to understand the concerns of ordinary people. when he said he would bet gov. kerrey of texas $10,000. he might have said five or $10. -- when he said he would bet governor perry of texas, $10,000. >> we will be glued tonight. later in the program, we will be looking at the dos and don'ts in a television debate. we will be speaking to a performance coach for politicians. stay tuned. now, to dramatic developments in the middle east. turkey has fired retaliatory rounds into syria after five of its citizens were killed by a syrian mortar shell. this is the most serious incident in recent months. there has been bloodshed further south. a series of bombs ripped through the heart of aleppo, killing more than 30 people. >> syrian shells fall on civilians. this is turkey, a town near the border. five people are reported killed, reportedly including a woman and her children. tonight, turkey announced it had already fired back. the turkish government is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a lot of today. -- no end to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television said that this is the result of rebel bombings today. most of those killed were soldiers at an officer's club in a government-controlled districts. neither side can defeat the other end of the syrian neighbors are increasingly at risk. -- and syria's neighbors are increasingly at risk. >> the iranian currency has lost 40% of its value in the past week. many say that the government is partly to blame for the crisis which has hurt living standards and trade. we report from the turkish- iranian border. >> shopkeepers in the center of tehran shutdown their stalls and protests against the collapse of the iranian rial. the government would like to stop street traders in giving in foreign currency. many iranians are desperate to convert their disappearing savings into dollars. they're taking their anger out on the government. now, these people are unafraid to protest. in recent years, the stories have succeeded in breaking down protests organized by the opposition. angry merchants and shopkeepers can't be much harder to stop. here on the border, we can find clear signs of the effect of the islamic republic's currency crisis. -- angry merchants and shopkeepers can be much harder to stop. iranian firms cannot afford to order in goods from turkish companies. the traffic across the border has almost stopped. the currency collapse is iran's worst financial crisis since the time of the iran-iraq war. this is now affecting how ordinary iranians are able to live their lives. that makes it a serious worry to the religious government of the islamic republic. >> in other news, vatican policemen testified at the trial of pope benedict's former but there have described how they found hundreds of documents hidden inside his home. he is charged with stealing and leaking confidential documents, some of which should have been destroyed. mr. gabrielle has denied theft. the french government has presented plans for a new anti- terrorism law that will allow authorities to prosecute anyone attending militant islamist running camps abroad. it is hoped that this will prevent a repeat of the deadly attacks which took place in march when a french radical islamist killed seven people. the director of the russian security service has blamed al qaeda for starting wildfires this summer which spread through southern europe and the balkans. he said the aim was to cause significant damage with minimum effort. in a farm into groups say there is no evidence that the blazes were caused by terrorists. the u.n. -- the united states classifies hamas as a terrorist organization. now, the group which controls gaza has been accused of torture, police brutality, and arbitrary arrest. the criminal justice system reeks of injustice according to human-rights watch. there has been isolated cases of abuse. they deny that it is systematic. our correspondent reports >> security forces in action. soon after they came to power in late 2007. human-rights watched says that police brutality remains a problem not only in the streets but inside the prisons. >> in this report we found that the authorities are arbitrarily detain people, to nine people access to the lawyers, and torturing people. in the worst cases are executing people based on a concession that was given under torture. we spoke to one young vocal opponent has been arbitrarily arrested dozens of times over the last five years. >> this continued for several days. they burned my foot with a cigarette lighter. another help to me down and they burned me again. >> in the prisons, this is not uncommon according to the report. unusually, hamas allowed human rights watch to announce its findings in gaza reflecting a greater openness to criticism and in the past. after the arab spring, hamas is not want to be painted with the same brush. there will be anger at police brutality which fuelled popular uprising. when i met with the deputy foreign minister, he denied widespread abuse. >> this is from time to time. >> do you except that happens, but a few bad apples have been doing that? >> this has happened here or there. i cannot confirm that. >> hamas complaints about prisoner abuse in israeli jails, torture by rival palestinian security forces on the west bank. the report by human rights watch acknowledges that happens. it also says that it is no excuse. >> a chinese owned company has filed a lawsuit against president obama for blocking its purchase of wind farms here in the u.s.. the president said there was security concerns. they are close to a naval facility, and an area of restricted airspace. it is rare for foreign investment to be blocked in the u.s. this is the first time in 22 years. is this more about american politics than in national security policy? >> of the white house said that it took this decision because the company at the heart of the dispute could have taken actions which would have impaired u.s. national security. these when farms lie close to a military base in oregon. that is used as a training site for unmanned drones, which of course is highly secretive and sensitive equipment. the chinese company says that it will fight the decision by mr. obama to block the sale. they said that he acted unlawfully. here in china, the decision is being seen as a political one and not based on national security. the state-run news agency put out an editorial saying that this was an example of china- bashing. you might remember that mitt romney has criticized barack obama for not taking a tough enough line on china. the contention of the chinese media is that mr. obama has made this decision in order to win voters. >> you are watching "bbc world news america," still to come -- the dos and don'ts of a television debate. we get some tips from mitt romney and barack obama from an expert. a british team is hoping to break the land speed record with its new supersonic car. >> on a windswept hilltop within the shelter of an aircraft hangar, the seconds ticked away to a milestone moment. across the airfield, final testing for the formula one engine which would force fuel into the largest hybrid rocket. three years of dairy when at last be put to the test. -- three years of theory would at last be put to the test. >> making that work would be a huge amount of pressure from five years ago. we started with a blank sheet of paper all the way 1,000 miles an hour -- all the way to 1,000 miles an hour. >> this is a typhoon rocket. they will sit one on top of the other. the object is to get the vehicle down this stretch in just over 3.5 seconds. they set out to share every development. this will be a moment of truth and watched around the world. another step on the journey towards the record attempt, it was not enough to satisfy a man familiar with the supersonics beat. >> i am very very pleased. what happens with a project like this you have a lot of hurdles to jump over. we might have had a setback. >> the system is fine. >> the aim is for the bloodhound to go supersonic next year and to break the barrier in 2014. the countdown is well under way. >> as we reported earlier, barack obama and mitt romney are getting ready for their first face-to-face spar on television. the two presidential nominees have spent hours learning lines and performing mock debates in order to beat their opponent and win over a television audience of tens of millions. critics will be watching as we move and listening to every move. what can they learn from their predecessors? the first television debate was in black and white in 1960. it was argued that john f. kennedy had shown richard nixon mainly because of the way he looked on screen. do these debates boil down to style over substance? we're joined by brian callahan who coaches government and industry leaders in public speaking. how much do looks matter in this? if nixon had sweated less in that clip that we just saw, would he have done better? >> i think he would have. particularly since it was the dawn of television and people were getting visual cues for the first time. when senator kennedy looked much more comfortable than nixon, that played very much to his advantage. >> well, let's take a look at the presidential debate now in 1984. ronald reagan was asked if he was too old to be president. >> i want you to know that i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i'm not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. [laughter] >> that is also one of my favorite lines. >> that is my favorite as well. >> it is pretty good. it tells us nothing about policy but it made us laugh. >> it tells us that he had a sense of humor. this was not a spontaneous response. it was carefully prepared and his camp knew that the montel camp would make an issue. it was a prepared sound bite but it was beautifully delivered and it worked tremendously well. >> a memorable vice presidential debate in 1988, republican dan quayle. he invoked the memory of john f. kennedy and this was senator bentsen's response. >> senators, i served with jack kennedy, i knew jack kennedy, jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. [applause] >> that still stings, doesn't it? is it possible to prepare for something like that? >> he probably should have. i remember that. a colleague of mine was in the room when that line was written for senator bentsen. the appearances -- become parents is to kennedy were frequent. senator quayle bought those would work to his advantage. -- the comparisons to kennedy were quite frequent. senator quayle sought those would work to his advantage. >> it was gotten wrong in a debate with george w. bush in 2000. you can see gore advancing threatening toward the bush who would later win the presidency after a battle over vote counting. i cannot imagine anything like that happening tonight. in fact, the opposite. these are very cool customers. how should they loosened up without making that mistake? >> al gore had the unfortunate personality -- he resembled a tin woodman when he was in front of the camera. i cannot believe that his approaching president bush was as big a deal as some would think that it was. but, he did it at the wrong time. >> right. very very briefly. these are two of the most televised men in the world. will we learn anything new about them? >> tonight's candidates, i think that we will. the way that they behave, the way they present themselves will make a significant difference. >> i will have to stop you there. thank you very much indeed for joining me. that brings us to the end of the show. thank you very much for watching. we will see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
WHUT
Oct 30, 2012 7:00am EDT
>> this is bbc world news. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news. >> sandy strikes int he u.s. kills 16 and a surge washes through city is on the east coast. the big apple is a big blackout. the storm sparked fires as well as flooding in at least 50 homes in queens. >> so far this has involved about five buildings. we could not get any apparatus down the block. >> welcome to bbc world news. also coming up in this program, as the economic slowdown goes on, financial heavyweights meet in berlin for a financial solution. we find out how hollywood makes sure some of its blockbusters appear on chinese screens. hello, people come up on the east coast of america, waking up too damaged after storm sandy swept across the region. 16 people have been killed as a result of the storm and 16 million are without power. -- 6 million people are without power. >> hello and welcome to washington on the east coast of america where the devastating power of storm sandy was unleashed last night, leaving millions in new york without power and widespread flooding in lower manhattan. break hasas triggered a major rescue operation. our correspondent has this report. >> the city that never sleeps, plunged into darkness. a perfect storm of strong winds, high tides, and a surge of seawater has paralyzed lower manhattan and the water poured into tunnels and underground car parked. no one here has seen anything like this before. >> i don't know what is going on. what the hell is this? >> a power station exploded on the east side of the city. elsewhere, fires broke out like this one in queens. 50 homes were destroyed. firefighters struggled to stem the blaze. >> it started in one building. it was blowing across. so far, this has involved the five buildings and numerous have collapsed. we cannot get in the apparatus up the block. >> millions of residents were told to stay at home. call 911 unless it is a real life threatening emergency. don't go out and don't drive. >> the coast of new jersey was the first part of the eastern seaboard to feel the full force of the hurricane. it brought heavy snow as well. >> high tide was getting closer and that meant large sections of atlantic avenue were starting to become submerged under water. >> it is still dark and too early to know the extent of the damage. further up the coast, falling trees adding to the danger. many have been rescued in emergency shelters. >> the red cross is operating 100 shelters along the east coast soap our main priority is making sure our residents have a safe place and a place to sleep. >> millions are now without power and no one can predict when the lights will come back on. the cost to the economy is estimated to be in the tens of billions of dollars. ouret's talk to correspondent who is in new york. i think they had all sorts of analyses. it was even worse than what they thought. >> i think the worst fears were confirmed last night when the storm came in all across manhattan playing havoc with public transport systems. floods have leave to many residents stranded. we have also seen some pretty devastating pictures of fires. this is in the borough of queens in new york state. this fire we believe destroying at least 50 homes caused by the power short circuits that have really taken hold and damaged so many buildings. just one of the big problems that the authorities here are dealing with. floods taking control of seven of the subway tunnels connecting manhattan to neighboring boroughs. they are not entirely flooded. the tunnel that connects manhattan to other parts also flooded and many of the road in and around lower manhattan are now completely under water which has an effect on the power. many of the power lines have been affected. water got into power substations and into electricity stations as they went off line plunge in many parts of manhattan into total darkness. >> it is going to be quite a few days before new york is able to pick itself up. the subway service, flights in and out of the capital, it is going to be days. >> we had an estimate from the head of the transport authority who said it could be four days until they get out the water which is before they are able to assess the damage to see what the water has done to electrical systems and trains still in those tunnels. they hope they have managed to move as much out of harm's way as possible. also the impact on getting around the city banned in the wind has now dropped so we expect the bridges to be reopened in. in lower manhattan, the area most exposed, it is pretty impassible at the moment. >> thanks very much for that update. we will be back with you throughout the day to keep us posted on the situation. joining us now is david from the disaster relief organization operation. i can see a little bit of daylight behind you. is that a street or a river behind you? >> it is a streak but in the last 48 hours it has been a river. the floods have now receded. this is the first time i have seen the street in a couple of days. things in virginia are starting to get back to normal. a sigh of relief for virginia but now the focus is turned to the states north of us. >> the rescue effort that you had on stand by there in virginia -- you may be moving up the coast. >> almost certainly. i will be in the office this morning with the rest of my team assessing where the greatest need is. it will surely be north of us. we are also hearing reports emerging of dams breaking in new jersey and fires in different places and then there is lots of flooding. we are going to have to decide this morning where best to focus our efforts. >> take me through last night. was it as bad as was anticipated? >> here in virginia it was not as bad as we had anticipated. there was a lot of localized flooding but we thought it could have been much worse. we thought there could have been loss of life here in the state of virginia. we are happy to say that it is not as bad here as we thought it was. it looked worse than expected in some places in new york. >> good luck with your rescue efforts if you move up to new york and new jersey and those other places that have been worse affected by hurricane sandy. let's speak now to a resident in lower manhattan, n.y.. thank you for speaking to us. where is it like where you are? >> similarly the flood waters have receded. as of last night, streets were covered anywhere from about a foot of water to 6 feet of water. right now it is looking better but we did experience quite a bit of damage to one of the community centers where i work. the basement level of that building was completely flooded, up to 15 feet of water. >> 15 feet of water? >> this was the son of the basement area of the building in which we worked. it was almost filled entirely with water. >> a lot of lower manhattan lost power. what is the situation there now? >> we are in a neighborhood in battery park where we still have power but we are looking across the highway and almost every building is running on emergency backup power or completely dark. >> it must be a very strange sight because even in the middle of the night in lower manhattan to lights are burning. >> it definitely does not look like the view that you get used to looking at every night. >> have you experienced anything like this? >> you know, for hurricane irene, we expected the worst. we had no idea what to expect. the damage is something -- it is definitely something [indiscernible] >> i guess there are an awful lot of people who will need help and it will be sometime before n.y. get back to normal again. >> getting all of the areas that were damaged help and for people out of power, it is going to be a big operation. >> thank you very much indeed for talking to us. i hope your community center gets pumped out very quickly. that me give you a bit more on this levee we heard about in northern new jersey. it is flooding towns with four to 5 feet of water in the wake of hurricane sandy according to officials at. we are in rescue mode according to the chief executive. what we have been hearing from local people is what has happened is there was a trailer park there which has been inundated and people have been climbing onto their roofs of their trailers for safety and waiting to be rescued been that there is obviously now a major rescue operation unfolding now in that county in northern new jersey. obviously we will keep you abreast of all that as well. it is not yet daybreak on the east coast of america. back to you in the studio in london. >> thank you very much. i have some breaking news to bring you out of afghanistan where two nato troops have been killed there in the south of the country. we understand from nato authorities, it looks as if this killing took place by a man wearing an afghan police uniform. a similar pattern we have heard from many occasions over the past few months. two nato soldiers killed in afghanistan. you are watching bbc world news. still to come, he received a 27- year jail term for war crimes. today the former general is appealing against that conviction. ♪ >> you are watching bbc world news. at least 16 people have been killed in the united states and canada as tropical storm sandy sweeps inland. at least 50 homes in golf in flames in queens as the storm leaves millions without power or transport. the heads of five major financial organizations are meeting with german chancellor angela merkel in berlin to voice their concerns about the economic slowdown. leaders of the world bank, the world trade organization, and the international monetary fund and bank in germany, employment figures have been released. there is a lot to chew over. let's find out what that means for the ongoing your resume crisis. steve, i presume it means there will be some pressure on angela merkel. will that be the message? >> yeah, i think it is. these are the five big umbrella organizations that deal with economics, and the messages coming from them is you have to think about the pace of austerity in the light of the circumstances on the ground. the message from the imf from example is that if you go too fast with deficit reduction, you may make the economy even worse adn so worse than the situation you are trying to cure. the argument is by enforcing strict rules, you make the patients iller. that message will come across loud and clear. the five people met 24 hours ago and made the same case. he agreed with them. when they meet chancellor angela merkel, it will not be an open door. i am sure it will be very polite and a lot of listening. there is no sign of much movement from the german government. >> i do not suppose it helped angela merkel when we look at the employment figures coming out today. not comfortable. >> no, because the argument becomes very, very real if your own economy is slowing down. the figures from germany showed the rate of unemployment remaining the same but the actual number going up a little bit. the movement is in the wrong direction. maybe the economy needs a bit of stimulus. >> thanks very much. a former serbian army chief is appealing his conviction of crimes against humanity and war crimes. it was chief of staff and the yugoslav army and was found guilty of aiding and abetting the shelling of sarajevo. chief of staff, pretty near the top of the trees in many respects. what is his argument? >> right at the top, he was the chief of staff in the yugoslav army and was found guilty of aiding and abetting those on the ground carrying out these crimes. his defense has been arguing that the ammunition on the ground cannot be directly attributed to their clients and saying that the evidence was circumstantial. we are about to hear from him. >> he is serving a 27-year sentence. would that be in holland cholesteric is he going to move back closer to home -- all end? is he going to be moved back closer to home? >> he has been serving a sentence in the detention center here. he is with other suspected war criminals. >> thank you very much. let get more on hurricane sandy, battering large parts of the u.s. east coast. in maryland, our correspondent is following developments. a very different theme from new york where you are. >> that is exactly right. sandy was a monster. it is pretty cold but new york city was devastated. atlantic city was almost wiped out. that city is waking up this morning underwater. we are hearing reports of the hospital that was evacuated with hundreds of patients including small children that had to be rushed out of their. president barack obama declaring a disaster area in new york and we are hearing that a levee breach in new jersey outside of new york. the stock exchange in new york city is going to be closed for a second straight day. almost 5 million people here in the united states are without power this morning. 8 states are going to be experiencing no fallout. folks are still very worried about putting this morning. >> interesting the way you talk about new york state in particular. do the people in maryland field that they got away with it? >> i would not say that because right now folks have not gone out to survey the damage them that we will know the impact in the days to come. there are a lot of people trap and a number of people who took refuge in shelters and left their homes. we are going to have to see how devastating this was. >> thanks very much. in just over a week's time, china's communist party will begin the process of appointing a new generation of leaders. there is one area argued that china lags behind the u.s. that is hollywood films. >> forget balls showing or the propaganda films. jain that is the world's largest growing segment of market and hollywood is going to great lengths to get a piece of the action. earlier this year when "men in black 3" hit the cinemas, this scene had been cut. when makers of the soon-to-be released "red sword," they reportedly remastered the footage to give north korea the villain's role. to playd's willingness along means it is gaining ground even in a market where local production is protected by a quota system that limits foreign film releases. despite the protectionism, despite hollywood being kept at bay, local chinese production is still failing to make the leap. they are struggling to take even half the total box office revenue. some chinese directors say the real threat to homegrown cinema is not hollywood by the rigid system of center ship. -- but the rigid system of censorship. >> a lot of chinese directors have avoided making movies about the reality of life because of the risk of censorship. for now it seems chinese audiences are voting with their feet and china is left wondering how to nurture an industry capable of matching america. >> that is a big challenge. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles.
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington, i'm jane o'brien. whose to blame? the country's foreign minister accuses other nations of supporting terrorism. door to door, street by street, we join grass root supporters in ohio as the u.s. presidential election campaign enters a critical week. and the miracle at medinah. europe's golfers stage one of the sport's greatest comebacks in the ryder cup. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nation, and it's a way of denying any legitimacy to the claims of the opposition and rejecting the possibility that the regime itself might have some culpability for the violence that has racked syria for the past 18 months, if not longer. so they've developed this as a way to fend off any responsibility and to shift the blame onto others. unfortunately they found support for their narrative including russia and iran and that has not got them to see things in a way more willing to talk about the possibility for change. >> also, very strong words about the u.s., which, of course, has only been providing nonlethal support to the opposition. is that you think an indication that even that support is having some impact? >> when you look at the effect that the uprising has had, it's not surprising that the regime lumps all of the governments that have supported the opposition into one big category as foreign conspirators. this is a regime that has lost control over enormous parts of its territory over the last 18 months. much of its officer corps has defected. it has failed to suppress the revolution. it has lost control over major urban centers. it's very much on the defensive and this is its way of striking back i think by targeting every government that supports political change in syria as supporters of terror. >> now, you're working very closely with various members of the opposition. there's been a lot of drift simple that they lacked unity. we're not quite sure who they are yet. do you think that they're ready for government yet? >> there is still a significant level of competition and conflict within the syrian opposition. but on a number of issues, including the kind of post-assad future that the opposition is fighting for. we find significant convergence across different spectrums of the opposition that was evident in the work we did with them, it's evident in the work the group that the arab league has sponsored, and i think these are very promising sides because even the question of who will lead remains unsettled and even if that continues to be a source of some competition among the opposition, that there are significant elements on which they can agree and that they can build on as the possibility for political change becomes closer. >> and meanwhile the fighting continues. steve, thank you very much indeed for joining us. >> thank you. >> well, to south africa now where a judicial inquiry has opened in the bloodiest security incident since the end of apar thide -- apartheid. 10, including two policemen, died during weeks of unrest at the miami. we have the latest. >> the commission of inquiry into the massacre began with the names of those who died being read out one by one. and then there was a minute of silence in memory of those who were killed back in august. the judge, a retired supreme court judge, outlined what he hopes to achieve through this fact-finding mission. >> we believe that as we read the evidence -- get really to the truth of what , why and how it happened will be part of the healing and restoration process. >> in a bit to have more time to consult with his clients, a senior legal counsel representing some of the families who lost their loved ones, requested this. >> we should postpone these proceedings. >> until when? >> the chairman declined. but promised a speedy process. the commission left its air-conditioned room and drove some 30 kilometers away to the scene of this shooting. >> cease-fire. >> so far you found 13 bodies. >> this is the 13th. there are two bodies. >> the judicial of inquiry is well and truly under way. as you can see the judge has come here to see for himself where the bodies of those who were shot were found. evidently there was still a feeling of deep mistrust on the ground. this commission of inquiry is expected to be completed within four months. south africans hope this investigation will end its part in the killing field. milton, bbc news. >> in other news now, somali forces have entered central kismayo two days after al shabaab fighters went in the region. they're patrolling the city's main roads for the first time. kismayo was al shabaab's largest strong hold and one of the largest sources of funding. at least eight people have been killed and 40 injured after a ferry sarning off the coast of hong kong. around 120 were onboard when at the collided with a tug boat near lamma island. they were going to view a fire work display to mark china's national day. iran's currentsy has fallen to a record low against the dollar. at one point on monday they lost 18% of its value. analysts say there's growing evidence that international sanctions over tehran's nuclear program are damaging the economy. now to the presidential race here in the u.s. and both mitt romney and barack obama are busy swatting up and rehearsing for the first television debate this wednesday. polls show the republican candidate is trailing president obama in the crucial swing states. one of them is of course ohio where early voting gets under way tomorrow. from there our north america editor reports. >> ♪ the boys are back in town ♪ >> the boys are indeed back in town yet again. they call this the buckeye state for the men who are fighting for the white house it's a state to suck up to, whether it's buying the local produce. >> i'm thinking we are going to be eating some corn over the weekend. >> or urging minors to phone a friend. >> want you to find one person to convince to vote for our ticket. >> both candidates are well aware in the last election in the last 44 years ohio has voted for the winning candidate so the politicians woo voters. >> we can create one million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years with the right policies. that's what i'm fighting for. that's why i'm running for a second term as president. that's what's going to be important to ohio. >> his plan is to continue what he's done before, the status quo has not worked. we cannot afford four more years of barack obama. we're not going to have four more years of barack obama. >> the road to the white house runs through ohio, that's why the candidates have made more than 30 visits here already. the fact is that in this huge country, the election will be decided in just a few places like this. this is the most expensive presidential race ever. the two parties have already spent more than $1 billion in all, much of it focused on just eight of america's 50 states. over a third of the money has been spent on political adverts aimed at swaying undecided voters, roughly a million people, around 3% of those who plan to vote. >> maybe instead of attacking others on taxes, romney should come clean on his. >> trying to reach these vital voters, the two campaigns have spent $116 million on tv ads in ohio alone, most attacking their opponent. >> fewer americans are working today than when president obama took office. >> but if the air war is important, the ground war could be important. an emotional opening of the latest obama campaign field office, they now have more in an 100 in the state. the romney campaign just over 30. here they're trying to rebuild obama's 2008 winning coalition of women, young people and african-americans to rekindle the old magic. >> fire it up. >> ready to go. >> door-to-door canvases check up on obama who vote -- on people who voted for obama last time. >> are you going to be voting this election? >> yes. >> i'm a volunteer with president obama's re-election campaign. >> others on the list get a phone call. tonight's session is aimed at women voters. their opponents say they're working just as hard and despite the polls there's everything to play for. >> our job is to knock on every door, call every person we possibly can, deliver every last piece of mail and the campaign's job is to close the deal, sell that last voter on that inspirational, aspirational message of where governor romney wants to take the country. >> when the rally is over the real work begins for people fighting the street-by-street battle to win this bellwether state. >> well, one thing we hope is certain, the first television debate between the two won't be as heated as the now infamous on-screen battle in russia last year. billionaire newspaper owner, alexander, lashed out at a fellow businessman during a live debate and is now being charged with hule beganism. but he says -- hull beganism. but he says it's against him. he's been speaking with the bbc's daniel sanford. >> it's one of the sensations of last year when one multimillionaire, alexander, thumped another one during the debate on the global economic crisis. but the fight has taken on a more serious dimension. he was charged with huliganism, motivated by political hatred. the charge means he could go to prison and he told me it comes on the back of several raids by men on his businesses. is there no idea why they're putting the pressure on you? >> no. only kind of subjective impression that i'm kind of a dissident, political dissident who's not only violating the principle that if you made some money, thanks to us, you shouldn't be criticizing us for something. there's an unwritten rule. some say that he should stop all of his investigations. that's the only way. >> that is the reference to a fierceless criminal investigative newspaper which he owns along with the former soviet leader mikheil gorbachev. so does he think vladimir putin is behind his troubles? >> i have the impression if we talked to him, he would say, i am not this character. you have a war with them. why should i interfere? i mean, these are separate institutions. my objection, no institutions here. just one institution which is the president. he runs everything. i mean, with the tip of his fingers, rather, than anything else. it's like believing that stalin never knew about the other. >> he is being charged with the same thing that a group of girls are being charged with. the three prisoners were back in court appealing their two-year sentences. but the case was postponed for 10 days. daniel, bbc news, moscow. >> you're watching "bbc world news america." still to congressional tonight's program -- the first african-american to attend university explains why race remains a crucial issue in the united states. >> south korean pop star has a u.k. number one. if you haven't heard it, hear this. >> the ridiculously catchy tune with its overtop video has become a global phenomenon. ♪ >> the song, what exactly is gangham style? >> it doesn't have any meaning actually. i'm just saying gangham style which doesn't have that much meaning. it's about some lady and some guys, you know -- >> the video has been viewed on youtube more than 300 million times. has more likes than any other in history. and despite being a self-parody has been affectionately spoofed by the thai navy, a gruche californian lifeguards. -- group of californian lifeguards and even prisoners in a jail. it's the latest in a long line of viral chart hits. remember this one? >> ♪ >> and what about the crazy frogs? but this is one has been more successful worldwide. when you play the song on the radio, people seem to quite like the song because it's catchy. normally with a novelty song like this people hate the song but quite like the video. this works on both levels. even britney speers is a fan. teaching the trademark movies on american tv. and that's the kind of support that may help him achieve the next big step of landing a number one single on both sides of the atlantic. >> ♪ gangham style ♪ >> it's being dubbed the miracle of medina. on the course outside chicago, europe's top players produced a stunning comeback to beat the u.s. in the ryder cup. the europeans have gone into the final day four points down and were playing in front of a large and strongly partisan american crowd. but in spite of the odds they managed to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. martin kaymer sank a five-foot putt to get his group where they needed to retain the trophy. well, joining me now from new york is mike walker, senior editor of "golf magazine" and golf.com. mike, thanks very much for joining me. i don't know much about the technicalities of golf, but i do get that the europeans pulled off a historic victory when the americans should have been unbeatable. what went wrong? >> yeah. the ryder cup, it's a strange thing that happens. i mean, these golfers generally are used to playing by themselves as we know. they get together as a team and there does seem to be something with this european team, something happens between the players, they feed off of each other's energy and then when they were down after saturday, four points, which in this format is a huge deficit, and they kept winning matches and they really seemed if one was ahead, another one would get ahead and they fed on each other and the next thing it was a tied match going into the end and the europeans pulled it off. >> the crowd must have been stunned. >> yeah, it was ryder cup crowds, they're really like nothing else in golf because fans act like fans at every other sporting event. they cheer very loudly. there was a strong european contention. on sunday definitely the strategy by the europeans was to take the crowd out of it. they got up early. they sent out their best players. they sent out luke donald. they sent out justin rose. they sent out rory mcilroye. they quieted the crowd in chicago and that's why they were able to win. >> tiger woods has been getting a lot of blame by the media here in the u.s. does he deserve it, do you think? >> i mean, over the course of its career, the ryder cup has been a place where he's not performed to the level he has in other spots. i do think that the format of the ryder cup is different. i mean, you look at the way people play tiger woods and it's not over 72 holes like they usually play. it's just one day. and there's no question that guys raise their games when they're playing against tiger woods. i mean, cosarts, when he played against tiger woods he didn't miss a putt. when luke donald played him, he played well. it's not that woods played poorly, the way the guys he was playing against, he couldn't match their level. does tiger woods take a blame? yeah. he doesn't play the way he normally plays at these events. his opponents definitely raised their game when they face tiger woods. >> mike, very, very briefly. can the u.s. break europe's winning streak, very briefly? >> i think there were a lot of positives from the u.s. they have a lot of young players who have that same atmosphere that the europeans do, that feed off each other. keegan bradley was a guy that came off with a lot of energy. zach johnson played well. this younger people that doesn't have the scar tissue having lost 15 years, the u.s. does feel good about the future. yes, we wish we can do this every year. you have to wait until 2014 to see fts going to happen. >> there is -- to see if it's going to happen. >> there's the challenge. mike walker, thank you very much. >> you're welcome. >> now to an iconic moment in the civil rights history. 50 years ago, the first african-american student to enroll at the university of mississippi. his place on campus was deeply unpopular among white students. it led to riots so severe president john f. kennedy sent in the national guard to restore order. so 50 years long, how have things changed in america? >> i came back to mississippi in 1960 to launch a war against white supremacy with the intent of destroying it. the color line didn't enter the picture. only citizenship. and the rights and privileges there are and the reality of enjoying them or not enjoying them. and that's the reason why i looked the way i did because i knew the other side of fear that if someone was in the situation where they were afraid and showed no fear it would scare the life out of the other side and i know it was for rear because they were shaking like a leaf on a tree. my job was finished. once i put the president of the united states in the position where he had to use the military might of the united states of america to protect my rights as a citizen, everything else was somebody else's job. i was not a human being. i was a soldier. and soldiers when they go to war, what soldiers do is kill enemies. of course a soldier must at all times be ready to die for his country and his cause. i went to war 50 years ago and i'm still at war. the present president of the united states was elected by the exact same people who elected their first 43 presidents of the united states and for exactly the same reasons. so nothing of substance has changed yet. i've always been at war with the system, not people. i just hope before i die i get the enemy to acknowledge that i ain't in a war with them and that they won the war almost all the time and that maybe i had one victory. >> speaking to us 50 years after he helped end racial segregation at the university of mississippi. and that brings today's show to a close. i'm jane eo'brien. thank you for joining and please come back tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los presented by kcet, los angeles. - get ready to vrrrooom with me, neighbour! because today we're going to clock factory park to play cars! and then we're going to katerina kittycat's house to do a jungle dance. i'm so happy you're here! and i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪
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